KUNM

Santa Fe International Folk Art Market

Marc Romanelli, International Folk Art Market 2016

For many artists in developing communities, creativity is abundant, but cash is not.

In Sarawak on the Island of Borneo, Senia Jugi learned at a young age to weave using bamboo, bembem, arrowroot and rattan. Her ethnic group, the Iban, use baskets for all kinds of everyday tasks as well as ritual occasions. She's advanced far beyond those early years and her works have received the UNESCO-World Crafts Council Award of Excellence.

Jabulile Nala began making pottery when she was 13 and was taught by her mother and grandmother. But the family legacy stretches back for over 100 years and the Nala name is synonymous with Zulu ceramics. The work of her mother, Nesta Nala, is in major collections around the world. But it can be a struggle to continue this legacy without access to markets beyond their village.

Santa Fe International Folk Art Market

The Indian art form of painting ritual designs on the floors and walls of houses, called “Madhubani” gradually moved from inside homes to the wider world on paper and canvas.

One-hundred sixty artists from 53 countries will gather in Santa Fe this weekend for the 14th Annual Santa Fe International Folk Art Market. Many will earn the majority of their income at the market and the proceeds help communities achieve economic independence. 

Christian Peacock/Folk Art Alliance

This weekend the world comes to New Mexico, as more than 150 artists kick off the 12th annual Santa Fe International Folk Art Market. For many artists from the developing world, the market has become a lifeline. 

Sidr Craft/Folk Art Alliance

The 12th annual Santa Fe International Folk Art Market takes place this weekend. More than 150 artists from around the world will be there - many of them will make the bulk of their income for the year at the market. Many artists also get intensive training and connections to international buyers to help them gain economic independence. 

Folk Art Alliance

More than 150 artists from around the world will gather this weekend at the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market. It has generated more than $20 million dollars in sales since it launched 12 years ago - and most of that money goes home with the artists. Those funds often support entire communities and help build schools, health clinics and homes. The money also helps revive ancient crafts in that are in danger of dying out.

Folk Art Alliance/Fair Winds Trading

The Santa Fe International Folk Art Market has generated more than $20 million in sales since it began 12 years ago. Most of that money goes home with the artists and supports entire communities. In some cases, shared prosperity also helps heal the effects of trauma.

Courtesy of the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market

This weekend the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market, IFAM, will feature an array of crafts from 150 master artists from 60 countries.

IFAM offers an opportunity for many craft people to support themselves and their communities, while also preserving cultural heritage and skills.

This year, Taiwan and Bangladesh are represented for the first time.