KUNM Call In Show

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Call In Show: Criminal Justice Reform

The nation’s prison system is in crisis. Prison and jail populations ballooned to an all-time high, and the number of people on probation and parole has doubled. Meanwhile, we're spending more on incarceration than we ever have—and most of that money comes out of the states’ pockets.
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Fine Print In Changes To Food Stamps Program

Almost a quarter of the people in New Mexico rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program—about 448,000. And the Human Services Department is once again calling for more work search and volunteer hours or job training for recipients. Opponents say the rule changes are confusing.
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Ed Williams

On Monday, the governor announced a two-week program offering free vaccinations to children before school starts.

 The Department of Health will run the program with money from the state’s general fund to cover vaccinations for uninsured children.

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Albuquerque’s Environment Department has denied the permit for a company to build a hot-mix asphalt plant near a wildlife refuge in the South Valley.

The department was slated to hold hearings about the plant, but before those were set, found that Albuquerque Asphalt’s plan could generate contaminant levels that exceed air quality standards.

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The Environmental Protection Agency awarded the Environmental Health Department more then $150,000 to continue keeping tabs on the amount of microscopic particles floating in the air.

Rita Daniels

Much to the dismay of many educators and community members in Taos, the district’s superintendent is threatening to relocate the alternative high school that serves at-risk kids. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

The traditional healing method known as curanderismo has been passed down through generations in this region, and practitioners from Mexico and around the state gathered Wednesday on the University of New Mexico campus.

Ed Williams

During the Cold War, the Navajo Nation found itself in the middle of a uranium mining boom. Today, more than 500 mines on the reservation are shut down or abandoned—but the pollution they left behind is still very much there. 

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More than one in five New Mexicans is on food stamps—that’s almost half a million people. Advocates are concerned that coming changes could force people off the federally funded program, and many religious folks are speaking out against the possible new rules. Faith leaders don’t see feeding the hungry as a partisan issue but rather as a basic tenet of their faith.  

Kaveh Mowahed

World Cup fever hit the U.S. hard this month, and Albuquerque soccer fans are still celebrating. The Albuquerque Sol are headed to the Premier Development League playoffs after finishing their regular season Monday. Their last home game was on Saturday.

(c) Gilbert Hernandez courtesy Fantagraphics

Who decides what teenagers get to check out from their school library? That question is at the center of a controversy in Rio Rancho, where school staff violated policy when they removed a book.

It all started back in February when a ninth-grader checked out a book from the library at Rio Rancho High School. He took it home and his mom saw it. 

Christian Peacock/Folk Art Alliance

This weekend the world comes to New Mexico, as more than 150 artists kick off the 12th annual Santa Fe International Folk Art Market. For many artists from the developing world, the market has become a lifeline. 

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Navajo Nursing Home Faces Closure, Breaking Bad Houses For Sale, Rain Galore ...

Navajo Nursing Home Faces Closure - The Associated Press The Navajo Nation's only nursing home, which caters to nearly 80 elderly patients, is at risk of being shut down as the facility faces a hefty fine over safety code violations.
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Public Health New Mexico

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City Denies Asphalt Plant Permit

Albuquerque’s Environment Department has denied the permit for a company to build a hot-mix asphalt plant near a wildlife refuge in the South Valley. The department was slated to hold hearings about the plant, but before those were set, found that Albuquerque Asphalt’s plan could generate contaminant levels that exceed air quality standards. The company applied to operate the plant around the clock less than half a mile from the Valle de Oro, which was designated a national wildlife refuge in...
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