KUNM

racism

Courtesy of Laura Gómez

UCLA Law Professor Laura Gómez grew up in New Mexico and she says it’s critical to know the history of racism against Mexican Americans and Latinos in the Southwest in order to understand today’s anti-immigrant and anti-Latino rhetoric and policies. She'll appear at Bookworks in Albuquerque on Saturday, March 10 at 3:00 p.m. to discuss her book Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican American Race

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Let's Talk New Mexico 2/15 8a. Call 277-5866 - Diversity has increasingly become a buzz word for businesses and industries in recent years and that includes the journalism industry, as newsrooms struggle to better represent the communities they serve. Here in New Mexico, the recent publication of a racist cartoon by the state's largest newspaper sparked a firestorm of criticism. We'll discuss racism in the news and diversity in newsrooms. 

Matthew Keefe via Flickr / Creative Commons via Flickr

The Albuquerque Journal’s decision to publish a racist cartoon in its editorial section on Wednesday, Feb. 7, drew a lot of criticism locally and across the country. Statements from the paper’s editors afterward didn’t do much to quell the outrage.

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The Albuquerque Journal is facing a backlash after publishing a racist editorial cartoon on Wednesday, Feb. 8.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 2/1 8a. Call 277-5866. Division over immigration policy shut down the federal government for three days. And in his State of the Union address this week, President Trump compared immigrants to criminal gangs and terrorists and again called for an overhaul of the nation’s immigration laws. We’ll look closely at issues of race and Latino and Hispanic identity in New Mexico and how they inform policy and political rhetoric on immigration at the local and national levels.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

People took to the streets all over the world, around the country and here in New Mexico for a second year of women’s marches. The concerns they raised were broad, including protecting the environment, fighting systemic racism, health care access, police violence and immigration reform. 

Clker-Free-Vector-Images via Pixabay / Creative Commons License

In downtown Santa Fe Friday Sept. 8, protesters will gather to call for an end to the annual re-enactment of the reconquest of the city by Spanish conquistador Diego de Vargas after the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. La Entrada is one of the events at Santa Fe’s annual Fiestas celebrations. 

Tony Webster via Flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

A federal sting last year resulted in the arrest of an unusually high number of African-Americans in Albuquerque, and mostly vulnerable, low-level offenders—not the bosses of big drug and gun rings.

YWCA New Mexico / with permission

  The YWCA is hosting its 1oth Annual Stand Against Racism community discussion in Albuquerque tonight. This year features a panel of women leaders of color who do work around race and racism.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Extremist opinion writer Milo Yiannopoulos delivered a speech at New Mexico’s flagship university in Albuquerque on Friday just hours after President Trump issued an executive order on immigration and refugees. Yiannopoulos champions free speech, but several dissenters were escorted from his event by police.   

Marisa Demarco/KUNM

At the Democratic headquarters last night in Albuquerque, the final election results rolled in and Hillary Clinton’s victory failed to materialize.

Lib.unm.edu / Creative Commons

KUNM Call In Show 10/13 8a: The 2016 presidential election has been polarizing. Many of the biggest divides are over class, gender and race. We'll talk about how this election is highlighting voter attitudes on these important topics.

Ardfern via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons License

There’s been a rise in anti-Muslim rhetoric in the wake of terrorist attacks in the U.S. and Europe. And the Southern Poverty Law Center found that the number of hate groups in the U.S. increased by 14 percent in 2015.

Local human rights activist Samia Assed says it’s a pivotal time in American history for defining who we are as a nation.

An Elegy For The American Character

Jul 1, 2015
Ardfern via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons License

As we approach the 4th of July holiday, commentator Andrea Mays says we need to reflect on how racism is a central part of the ‘American character.’

Andrea Mays is an American Studies scholar who lives in Santa Fe. Her bi-weekly column, Here’s The Thing, is published by the Santa Fe Reporter. Find the full piece online here.

Don't Slip On The Peel

Apr 23, 2015
Black Glenn via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Many people in the U.S. proclaimed the election of President Barack Obama proof that our nation had become a post-racial society.

But commentator Andrea Mays says Trayvon Martin’s murder, the choke-hold death of Eric Garner, the police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and most recently, the killing of Eric Harris in Oklahoma by a white volunteer police officer shows we aren’t there, yet.