KUNM

Public Health New Mexico

KUNM's Public Health New Mexico reporting project provides in-depth, investigative and continuous coverage of public health in New Mexico, with an emphasis on poverty. For all articles and web exclusive content, go to publichealthnm.org 

pexels via CC

Let's Talk New Mexico 4/26 8a: We're talking about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and whether people in our state can access it. We'll also talk about the Farm Bill proposed in Congress, which would increase work requirements for people using SNAP, along with other changes. Have you applied for SNAP? How did the process go for you? Or what do you think of work requirements for people participating in this programs? How can people in New Mexico get the food they need? Email letstalk@KUNM.org, tweet #letstalkNM or call in live during the show. 

Donovan Shortey, navajophotography.com via Flickr

 

Getting health care when you’re a veteran living on the Navajo reservation can be an all-day affair, starting with hours of driving to Albuquerque. Last week, the Navajo Nation Council unanimously approved more than $2 million to fund a veterans service center on tribal land.   

Pexels / CREATIVE COMMONS

The state’s Peer-to-Peer Warmline has introduced a texting option. This could help more locals early on so they won’t need to call a crisis hotline later.

Kalsom Cheman via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons License

University of New Mexico undergraduate tuition has gone up over 50 percent in the last decade. The UNM Board of Regents gave the green light to raise tuition again in March. New research suggests increasing tuition could reduce student diversity. Greg Wolniak co-authored the research and spoke with Public Health New Mexico’s Sarah Trujillo.  

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

For decades, families in New Mexico have been missing out on food and medical assistance that they’re eligible for under federal law. Records show that things have gotten better in recent months. Still, the issue’s been in court for 30 years, and a federal judge says one problem is a lack of accountability within the state’s Income Support Division

Max Klingensmith via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The head of the state department that oversees behavioral health services is at odds with Governor Susana Martinez’s administration over how to handle gun violence in local schools.

Ed Williams

 


New Mexico’s rate of opioid overdose deaths used to be one of the worst in the country, but it’s slowly been improving. A new study says some of the state’s strategies could be helping.

Alexa Graham via Flickr / Creative Commons License

 


There could be more peace of mind for people in Albuquerque who don’t qualify for the state’s medical cannabis program if Mayor Tim Keller signs a measure city councilors passed on Monday. It would decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis.

 

Auntie P via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The Human Rights Campaign released the results of their health equity study and a couple of New Mexico's hospitals did really well.

516 Arts

 


Americans are deeply divided over how to handle immigration and an art exhibit in Albuquerque is working to bring new perspectives into the conversation.

Christian Haugen via Flickr / Creative Commons

 

Babies who are born underweight are at higher risk of developing health problems or even dying.

New state data show the rate of babies born with low birth weights to African American moms here hasn’t improved in almost two decades.

Joaquin Gonzales, Director / Taos County EMS

 

Taos County recently rolled out the area’s first ambulance made specifically to transport obese patients. It can make it safer and more comfortable for heavier people to get medical assistance.

Ajnagraphy via compfight / Creative Commons License

Some local advocacy groups are teaming up to provide more resources for children who’ve been sex-trafficked. Right now, there’s not a lot out there to help them recover.

Sarah Gustavus

A proposal to decriminalize recreational cannabis in Albuquerque would do away with jail time and shrink fines. Co-sponsor Albuquerque City Councilor Pat Davis said the time is right and the measure has a lot of support. He also said it would also help police focus on more pressing things.

Courtesy UNM

 


 

One Albuquerque clinic has been testing almost all of its pregnant patients for hepatitis C, according to UNM researchers. That means more people could be cured down the line.

Sarah Trujillo via KUNM

Folks gathered this afternoon in downtown Albuquerque to urge Congress to continue protections for people who were brought to the U.S. as children illegally.

Pixabay via Creative Commons

The Childrens Health Insurance Program covers over 9 million kids nationally, but the well of federal funds has been dry for months, and with strife in Congress, uncertainty lingers.

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

Nearly one in 10 Americans works in the health care industry. It’s the same for our state, but there’s still a shortage of nurses here. Some schools are making efforts to get more nurses into the field.

Sasin Tipchai / Creative Commons via Pixabay

The Albuquerque-area’s public safety net hospital can no longer demand half upfront from uninsured folks getting medically necessary surgeries as of late last week. But advocates say the hospital has yet to fully put this change into practice.

Gordon Johnson / Creative Commons via Pixabay

It’s about time for open enrollment on the state health insurance exchange. The New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange is partnering with Catholic Charities to offer residents free one-on-one appointments with insurance agents and brokers starting November 4th.

N.M. Insurer Saw Trump's Subsidy Cuts Coming

Oct 13, 2017
Proulain via Pixabay / creative commons license

President Trump’s decision to cancel cost sharing subsidies to insurance companies has prompted speculation that plans offered under the Affordable Care Act could unravel. Some insurers in New Mexico are saying not to worry yet.

Ed Williams / KUNM/Public Health New Mexico

Bernalillo County is joining a growing number of state and local governments in taking drug companies to court over the opioid epidemic. The county's decision to sue the drug companies comes just a week after Mora County filed its own suit in district court. 

HSD Moves Ahead With Unpopular Medicaid Changes

Sep 6, 2017
WerbeFabrikvia pixabay / creative commons license

The New Mexico Human Services Department has been considering charging Medicaid recipients copays in an effort to save money from the state’s cash-strapped budget. The proposals were met with strong opposition in public meetings earlier this year. But the state is moving forward with the changes anyway. 

Freeabqimages.com

These mayoral forums are a chance to meet and learn about Albuquerque’s mayoral candidates. Topics covered include public safety and police, public health, the economy, and much more. Check them out.

State of the City Mayoral Forum 
Organized by ABQ Center for Peace and Justice
Friday, September 1,  6 – 8 PM
North Domingo Baca Multigenerational Center
7521 Carmel Ave NE

Uncertainty Lingers For NM Insurance Markets

Aug 25, 2017
Images Money via CC

For months health insurance providers on the New Mexico exchange have been struggling with uncertainty—over whether the Affordable Care Act would be repealed, and now over whether the White House will authorize subsidies to insurers after the month of August.

Balderas Opposes Rollback Of Nursing Home Rule

Aug 21, 2017
Horia Varlan via Flickr / Creative Commons License

New Mexico’s attorney general is opposing a move by President Trump to undo an Obama-era rule protecting nursing home patients.

Bernalillo County

Water has always been at the center of the controversy over Santolina, a massive project planned for over 20 square miles on a dusty mesa west of Albuquerque. The project got another boost Tuesday after officials voted to allow the project’s developers more time to come up with a plan for water use.

Mike Tungate via Wikimedia / creative commons license

The Bernalillo County Commission will hold another public meeting Tuesday on Santolina, a controversial 22-square mile residential development planned for an area west of Albuquerque.

Tumiso via Pixabay / Creative Commons License

Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act died in Congress last week – at least for now. But local insurance carriers are still struggling with a lot of unknowns under President Trump.

jensjunge via Pixabay / creative commons license

Health advocates in New Mexico are urging lawmakers to improve Medicaid and the insurance markets now that Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act have failed. 

Pages