KUNM

Local News

Content from the KUNM news team and affiliated organizations.  

Laura Paskus/KUNM

New Mexico’s Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management is late paying out millions in federal disaster relief money it owes local governments and contractors.

That money came to the state through FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and is meant to help communities clean up after natural disasters such as wildfires and floods.

Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

Opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline continues to grow beyond its North Dakota roots, with solidarity protests Tuesday in dozens of cities across the country and the world.

Flickr photo by VoxFX

KUNM Call In Show 9/15 8a: A lot of New Mexicans don't vote in general elections - often nearly half the people who can legally vote here don't. And the stakes are high this November with a hotly contested presidential election at the top of the ticket. We’ll talk about why so many New Mexicans don't vote. Is it hard for you to make it to the polls? Are you turned off by the candidates that you have to choose from? Or are you ineligible to vote?

Heath Haussamen / New Mexico In Depth

Gov. Martinez: 'More Items' May Be Added To Special SessionAssociated Press

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez is signaling she may add "more items" to a looming special session on the state's budget crisis.

Joe Catron via Flickr / Creative Commons License

UNM’s Kiva Club, a Native American issues student club, and a Native American Studies class are holding a demonstration Thursday to show solidarity with tribes from across the country that are protesting the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline in North Dakota.  

Laura Paskus/KUNM

New Mexicans have needed help after wildfires and floods in recent years. FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has done its part: sending money to the state of New Mexico. But the state has not released tens of millions of dollars for contractors who did disaster recovery work.

Victoria Edwards/KUNM

Stories of outsiders coming to New Mexico to exploit the state's resources are nothing new – think Spanish colonization.

That’s how many critics see Santolina, a 22-square-mile development proposed for an area west of Albuquerque. But opponents of the project are fighting back in court.

401(K) 2012 via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Students at the University of New Mexico who pay their tuition online are going to have reach deeper into their pockets this semester. A 2.75 percent processing fee kicked in about a week before classes started. 

Turquoise Table via Flickr / Creative Commons

KUNM Call In Show 9/1 8a:

New Mexico produces the majority of chile in the U.S. according to the New Mexico Chile Association, and the crop brings millions the state. This fruit has become an integral part of our economy and our culture. Yet the industry faces serious challenges, with declining acreage and labor shortages.

http://hscnews.unm.edu/news/unm-medical-students-immersed-in-rural-medicine-training

This summer, over 100 medical students from the University of New Mexico spread out across the state, working at health care facilities in rural or underserved communities.  The program is part of the UNM School of Medicine's Practical Immersion Experience.

Second-year student Josh Romero talks about his work this summer at La Familia, a community health center in Santa Fe.

Kate Russell Photography

The traditional folk music of New Mexico has been celebrated for the past 16 years at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in Santa Fe with Nuestra Música, a concert celebrating the music traditions of the state.

NASA

In 2014, NASA announced they’d found that the largest plume of methane gas in North America was right here in New Mexico.

At the time, scientists didn’t know exactly where the methane was coming from – but now they’ve completed some research and published their findings.

Discipline In Our Schools

Aug 23, 2016
La Veu del País Valencià via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 8/25 8a: 

Students are back in classrooms across New Mexico. In the coming year, teachers and administrators will have to make decisions about how to discipline students. Is discipline fair in school districts across the state? Are all students treated the same when they are disciplined? Do you have concerns about how your children or grandchildren are being disciplined during the school day? How can we ensure that punishment in schools is equitable, particularly for students of color and students with disabilities? 

Anna Lande / KUNM

Former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson was in Albuquerque Saturday to rally supporters for his presidential bid as the Libertarian candidate. Gary Johnson needs to reach 15 percent in some national polls to be included in presidential debates alongside Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump. KUNM's Anna Lande was there to find out why people are thinking of voting for Johnson.

Bob Mical / Creative Commons via Flickr

Facebook is going to have to choose where to put its new data center: New Mexico or Utah.

The social media company stores its users’ uploads, mostly millions and millions of photos, on servers. Communities want these data centers because they inject cash back into the hosting community. 

It can be stressful and sometimes scary to be pulled over by a police officer for a traffic stop. Some local actors, writers and artists are planning an interactive role-playing event this weekend at Warehouse 508 in Albuquerque for cops and people from the community to come together to learn about each other and practice how to avoid conflict. It's called CommUNITY Conversation - Positive Policing: Reimagining the Traffic Stop.

Sally King, National Park Service

KUNM Call In Show 8/18 8a: 

  

In New Mexico there has always been tension between humans and the wild animals who share our state, so how should we manage that tension? If a bear mauls a marathon runner, should it be shot? How should we deal with coyotes who prey on our pets, wolves that snatch calves or cougars that come just a little too close to the kids? 

Laura Paskus/New Mexico In Depth

During the irrigation season in New Mexico, the Rio Grande is allowed to go completely dry in some stretches. Even Saturday’s intense thunderstorm in Albuquerque hasn’t sustained flows in some regions of the river south of the city.

401kcalculator.org via Flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

KUNM Call In Show 7/28 8a: New Mexico’s economy is struggling, particularly as energy prices remain low. That has brought job losses and shrinking revenues. Our unemployment rate remains one of the highest in the country. What is hampering New Mexico from diversifying its economy? What are the strengths in our communities that we can tap to grow our existing businesses, while helping new companies launch? 

Tax subsidies are often used as a kind of sweet carrot to incentivize developers to invest in abandoned or run down parts of cities, bringing resources where they wouldn’t go otherwise.

But critics of Santolina, a proposed 22 square mile housing development west of Albuquerque, say these subsidies shouldn’t be used for sprawling new suburban communities.

Victoria Edwards/KUNM

Some developers who build huge housing projects say it’s common sense to ask the community share in the cost of paying for public infrastructure.

insunlight via Flickr / Creative Commons License

There’s been a lot of focus lately both locally and nationally on how police officers use force—sometimes deadly force—against people.

Now, New Mexico’s largest jail is back in the headlines after it was revealed that two inmates may have been the victims of excessive use of force.

Sarah Gustavus

KUNM Call In Show 7/28 8a: New Mexico is known for its incredible outdoor beauty. Are you taking advantage of opportunities to hike, bike, paddle or camp in state and national parks this summer? What does time in the outdoors mean to you? What keeps you from spending more time in nature? 

mtungate via Flickr / Creative Commons License

 The Bernalillo County approval process for a huge housing development on Albuquerque’s west side stalled on Thursday.

The county planning commission chair blamed the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority for not working with Santolina developers to get a water contract in place that would spell out water availability for the 38,000-unit housing development.

SalFalko via Flickr / Creative Commons

New Mexico Newspapers Want Settlement Details From CorizonAssociated Press   

Two newspapers and an advocacy group have asked a New Mexico district court to publicly release some settlement documents between Corizon Health and inmates in the state's prison system.

hugovk via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 7/14 8a: This week, we want to hear your response to recent police shootings of African Americans—and the killing of five Dallas police officers. How do you think the shootings of officers in Dallas have affected the national conversation on race and policing? What are the ripple effects of these deaths right here at home in New Mexico? How has the widespread anger and fear affected police officers and their ability to do their jobs? How are activists taking care of themselves in the face of a problem that's hard to gain ground with? 

City of Albuquerque / Creative Commons via Flickr

For the folks beating back flames during New Mexico’s dry season, knowing the science behind fire behavior can save lives and property. Members of the Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) are collecting information on fuel loads, which are the amount of wood on a forest floor that could sustain a fire. The hope is that the data will help firefighters predict the direction and intensity of a blaze.

Daphne Carrillo

UPDATE Wednesday, 29, 11:00 a.m.: The Dog Head Fire is 91 percent contained. A total of 12 residences and 44 minor structures have been damaged. The U.S. Forest Service says the wildfire was human-started, but they are still investigating how it happened.

Kevin Dooley via Flickr

It looks like state officials have scrapped a $1 billion proposal to divert water from the Gila River in southwestern New Mexico – but they’re still looking to spend $80 million to $100 million to take water from the river for towns and farmers.

Mike Tungate via Wikimedia Commons CC

The planned Santolina suburb on Albuquerque’s West Mesa has hit a potential snag: There is no agreement in place between the developers and the Water Authority, a mandatory pre-requisite for the next phase of the project. Without that agreement in place, Bernalillo County planners are hesitant to send up the second stage of Santolina’s plan for approval before the County Commission.  

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