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health insurance

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Let's Talk New Mexico 10/19 8a: Recently, the Trump Administration has relaxed rules on health insurance plans and contraception coverage, and cancelled subsidies that help get health coverage to low income people. What do these developments mean for the future of health care in New Mexico? 

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New Mexico’s not-for-profit, low-cost insurance cooperative is selling part of its business to a for-profit insurer.

The company hopes the sale will help buffer against uncertainty around the future of the Affordable Care Act.

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New Mexico’s top health insurance official is adding his name to a letter opposing the latest Republican effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. 

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For months health insurance providers on the New Mexico exchange have been struggling with uncertainty—over whether the Affordable Care Act would be repealed, and now over whether the White House will authorize subsidies to insurers after the month of August.

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As Republicans work to fulfill their promises to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, the future of healthcare in the U.S. is up in the air. In New Mexico, health insurance carriers have to submit their proposed premium rates by this weekend. After state officials review them, the public will have 10 days to weigh in.

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KUNM Call In Show 5/11 8a: Call 1-877-899-5866. With Republican plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act moving through congress, the future of healthcare in New Mexico is facing a lot of uncertainty. We’ll look at what changing the healthcare law could mean for New Mexicans, and for our state’s Medicaid system and insurance markets.

New Mexico in Focus

U.S. Representative Democrat Michelle Lujan Grisham is running for re-election this year in New Mexico’s first district. She sat down with Gwyneth Doland to discuss critical issues for voters as part of KUNM’s special election coverage with New Mexico PBS.

Her Republican challenger Richard Priem did not respond to multiple interview requests from New Mexico PBS. 

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KUNM Call In Show 9/22 8a: When people get sick but don’t have insurance or Medicaid, how do they get help? New Mexico's indigent care programs provide medical care for people who can’t afford it. We'll look at whether these programs are meeting the needs of low-income patients in New Mexico. Are you uninsured? How do you get hospital care? How can hospitals and clinics pay for services for low-income patients?

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The Bernalillo County Commission voted Tuesday night to put a measure that would continue funding treatment for low-income and uninsured patients at UNM Hospital on November’s ballot.

UNM Hospital has been getting around $90 million a year in taxpayer dollars to pay for medical care for patients who can’t afford it. Now voters here will be asked to choose if they want to keep that money coming.

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UnitedHealthcare is dropping insurance coverage for its Medicaid patients at the University of New Mexico Hospital. The decision comes after months of negotiations.

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UNM Hospital and UnitedHealthcare are in negotiations over continuing coverage for the company’s Medicaid patients. The hospital and insurer haven’t come to an agreement yet and are extending their negotiations for 60 more days.

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Health insurance can be complicated and understanding how to get covered can be difficult. Students at a specialized charter school in Albuquerque are producing podcasts to help people navigate the health insurance system.

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This week Blue Cross Blue Shield announced it will be pulling out of the state health insurance exchange in January. President Kurt Shipley says the company lost over $19 million in New Mexico this year and is leaving, because state officials denied its request for a 51 percent rate increase.  

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The organization managing health insurance signups in New Mexico is reporting positive numbers one week into the Affordable Care Act’s second open enrollment period. 

"We are seeing some response," said Linda Wedeen of the New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange. "Our goal this year that's going to be different from last year is we're working very hard to let people know we're there to assist them through this process. We know it can be complicated."

Ed Williams

 

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 7/17 8a: The U.S. Supreme Court decided last month to strike down part of the Affordable Care Act’s mandate for employer-provided contraception coverage.