KUNM

economy

Katharine Egli for the Solutions Journalism Network

Quality internet service is key to overcoming poverty, according to studies worldwide. But all over the U.S., people of color and folks with low incomes are less likely to have access to an affordable, reliable connection. Plus, big corporations are often unwilling to lay line through tough terrain without a lot of customers.

Let's Talk Counting On D.C.

Jan 23, 2018
forcal35 via Pixabay / creative commons license

Let's Talk New Mexico 1/24 8a: Call now 277-KUNM or 277-5866. This weekend thousands of New Mexicans braced for an uncertain work week after failed budget negotiations in Washington, D.C. led to a three-day government shutdown that ended Monday. 

Between national labs and military bases, public lands and social services, the federal government does a lot in New Mexico. Do you work for or do business with the federal government? How does uncertainty about federal funding affect you?

This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’re talking about what it's like to have so many jobs in our state tied to federal funding. Join the conversation on Twitter with #letstalkNM or call in live during the show.

Andrew Lyman / NM Political Report

Gov. Susana Martinez will give the final State of the State address of her second term on Tuesday, Jan. 16, at the start of the legislative session. She’ll likely be framing her legacy as someone who’s been tough on crime.

Federal Communications Commission via CC

The Federal Communications Commission is scheduled to vote on rolling back net neutrality protections and to weigh media ownership rules again on Thursday, Dec. 14. Surveys show the changes are not supported by people across the country, regardless of political party. KUNM spoke with Viki Harrison, the executive director of Common Cause New Mexico, about what these policy shifts could mean in New Mexico.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

 

Oil and gas drilling and mining companies come to rural areas offering jobs and cash, but they also dig into the land, pull resources out of it and create pollution. There are some folks in these regions who say the trade off isn’t fair in the long run. One organization is working on the Navajo Nation to stabilize the boom-and-bust economy of extraction by boosting local entrepreneurs and small business.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

The question before Albuquerque voters on the ballot tomorrow: Should all employees be able to earn an hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours they work? Advocates who help people experiencing violence at home say it’s crucial.

Local government has to provide millions of meals every year to schools and to people who are incarcerated. It’s big money for whoever’s providing that food. The state auditor found it’s mostly national companies that get those multi-million-dollar food contracts.

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

New Mexico’s struggled to recover fully from the recession, and it can still be a real challenge to find steady work in the state. That’s central to how 18-year-old Quinton Valencia is casting his vote this year. KUNM tagged along with Valencia as he applied for a job at Target in Rio Rancho.

New Mexico in Focus

U.S. Representative Democrat Michelle Lujan Grisham is running for re-election this year in New Mexico’s first district. She sat down with Gwyneth Doland to discuss critical issues for voters as part of KUNM’s special election coverage with New Mexico PBS.

Her Republican challenger Richard Priem did not respond to multiple interview requests from New Mexico PBS. 

Turquoise Table via Flickr / Creative Commons

KUNM Call In Show 9/1 8a:

New Mexico produces the majority of chile in the U.S. according to the New Mexico Chile Association, and the crop brings millions the state. This fruit has become an integral part of our economy and our culture. Yet the industry faces serious challenges, with declining acreage and labor shortages.

401kcalculator.org via Flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

KUNM Call In Show 7/28 8a: New Mexico’s economy is struggling, particularly as energy prices remain low. That has brought job losses and shrinking revenues. Our unemployment rate remains one of the highest in the country. What is hampering New Mexico from diversifying its economy? What are the strengths in our communities that we can tap to grow our existing businesses, while helping new companies launch? 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Dollar stores are everywhere these days—they’re being built at a record pace, according to industry reports. In some rural communities in this state, you might not see any store except a dollar store. A campaign is calling on these discount chains to make sure products are nontoxic.

Ed Williams

When an industrial business like a concrete plant or a hazardous waste processor sets up shop in a residential neighborhood, arguments for economic growth and public health often clash.

Those tensions are especially high in the neighborhood of Mountain View, south of Albuquerque, where dozens of polluting businesses border neighborhoods, community centers and schools.

Eduardo Mueses via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 3/24 8a: 

  

New Mexico's creative sector employs thousands of people and generates tens of millions of dollars for state and local governments. We'll talk to people who are working to leverage this dynamic sector to boost our economy and we'd like to hear from you! 

New Mexico 2050: A Look Into The State's Future

Sep 14, 2015
Dave Lea via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 9/17 8a:  

What will the New Mexico of the future look like? How will we address the issues facing our state –  poverty, water, jobs and transportation? This week on the KUNM show we'll talk to former U.S. Senator Fred Harris about his new book, New Mexico 2050.

Laura Paskus

Thanks to technologies like hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, New Mexico is one of the top natural gas producers in the world – 27th according to the latest annual numbers from 2012 just released by the American Petroleum Institute. But there’s more to the economics of drilling than just counting rigs and tallying profits.

Marisa Demarco

Republican Gov. Susana Martinez secured a second term last night, beating her Democratic challenger Gary King handily. Martinez emphasized bipartisanship during her acceptance speech at the Marriott in Albuquerque, which was packed with Republicans from around the state.

As Economic Development Secretary Jon Barela introduced Gov. Martinez late Tuesday night, he focused on her heart—perhaps a nod to opponent Gary King’s maligned comment about the governor’s not being Latino enough. 

UPDATE Feb. 19, 2014, at 1:00 p.m.: HB 81 is stuck in committee.

Two years ago, the USDA made the first changes in a generation to public school meals. Students would see more produce at lunchtime.

CDC Says Excessive Drinking Costs Taxpayers Billions

Aug 14, 2013
Centers for Disease Control

Excessive alcohol consumption cost United States taxpayers more than $220 billion in 2006. That's according to a new study released by the Centers for Disease Control.

According to the CDC, excessive alcohol consumption, primarily binge drinking, poses a huge public health problem across the country. Major economic impacts include police responses to violence and treatment of health problems related to alcohol.

Courtesy U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Climate change is a threat to New Mexico’s natural environment and a new study argues that makes it a serious economic threat as well.

Tourism, the creative arts, agriculture, ranching, and the dairy industry all stand to lose millions of dollars, according to Demos, the public policy group that published “New Mexico’s Rising Economic Risks from Climate Change.” The report is authored by Robert Repetto, author of the 2011 book, "America’s Climate Problem: The Way Forward." He is a senior fellow in the United Nations Foundation’s climate and energy program.