KUNM

cycling

knehcsg via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

New Mexico ranks 44th in the country for bicycle friendliness. A new study by the Santa Fe Police Department looked at 110 bicycle crashes that happened in the city in the last three years and the factors surrounding them.

George Hodan via PublicDomainPictures.net / Creative Commons License

Let's Talk New Mexico 3/29 8a. Call 277-5866. As the temperature rises, so will the number of bicycles on the road. We'll look at how cyclists can be safe and whether communities and drivers are doing their part. Are there enough bike lanes, bike boulevards and bike paths for cyclists to use in your community? Are these efforts enough? Is the responsibility on cyclists or drivers to make roads safe for bicycles?

Creative Commons, Wiki

Sat. 10/8, 9a: This Saturday on The Children's Hour, the KUNM Kids will find out about the upcoming Albuquerque biking event, CiQlovia.  Plus, Eric Blinman from New Mexico's Office of Archeaological Studies will tell us about Archeology Day.  

Do you like spooky books?  It's the birthday of RL Stine, author of over 300 books, many of which give kids Goosebumps, and Eliot will review a ghostly book just in time for pre-Halloween reading. 

Shifting Gears On Bike Safety

Aug 28, 2014
vonderauvisuals via flickr

Every year in New Mexico there are hundreds of accidents involving people riding bicycles, some of them fatal. But efforts are underway to make the roads safer in Albuquerque by helping cyclists and drivers become more aware of one another.

Eight years ago on the corner of Comanche and Pennsylvania in northeast Albuquerque, avid cyclist Paula Higgins was riding her bike when she was struck by a car in the middle of the intersection. The collision proved fatal for Higgins who died a few hours later. Jennifer Buntz was her one of her long time cycling buddies.

Better Biking In 'Burque

Jul 11, 2014
Rita Daniels

New Mexico's largest city has a plan to make cycling safer. It includes everything from expanding existing bike lanes to eliminating some of the hazards that cause flat tires.

For years, cyclists in Albuquerque have been navigating a disjointed system of trails and roads where bike lanes suddenly disappear in areas of heavy traffic and trails peter out into nothing.  But now the city has come up with a proposal that would fill in those gaps.