KUNM

APD

Marla Brose / Albuquerque Journal

Two former Albuquerque police officers are facing murder charges for what could be the first time here. The effectiveness of the SWAT team in dangerous situations has come into play during the trial, and police who were there the day James Boyd was shot in 2014 have been testifying in court. It’s the first time the public has heard directly from many of these officers. 

Greg Sorber / Albuquerque Journal

The defense has started putting on its case on Thursday, Sept. 29, in the trial of two Albuquerque police officers facing murder charges for shooting and killing James Boyd.  There were protests in Albuquerque after the shooting, and many people objected to police treatment of the homeless man, who had a mental illness.

Jim Thompson / Albuquerque Journal

A longtime Los Angeles police officer and trainer took the stand on Friday, Sept. 30, to testify that the Albuquerque police who were near James Boyd before he was killed were acting professionally.

Roberto Rosales / Albuquerque Journal

The prosecution rested its case Wednesday in the trial of two former Albuquerque officers, and now it’s the defense’s turn to present the events that led to the death of James Boyd, the homeless man killed by police in 2014. 

Greg Sorber / Albuquerque Journal

In the trial of the two Albuquerque police officers who shot and killed James Boyd, question surfaced about why tactical officers went to the scene when they weren’t officially activated that Sunday in 2014. 

Jim Thompson / Albuquerque Journal

District Court Judge Alisa Hadfield declined Wednesday to drop the second-degree murder charges against two former Albuquerque police officers who shot and killed homeless camper James Boyd in 2014. But she did drop voluntary manslaughter charges, leaving jurors with fewer options for their verdict.

Juan Labreche / Associated Press

Defense attorneys filed a motion on Wednesday, Sept. 28, alleging misconduct by the prosecution in the trial of two former Albuquerque police officers who shot homeless camper James Boyd.

Greg Sorber / Associated Press

In the days after James Boyd was killed by police in Albuquerque, questions arose about whether officers specially trained to talk to people who are mentally ill had been sent to the scene. And it turned out, that an officer known for deescalating situations like the one was sent to the foothills that day in 2014. 

Russell Contreras / Associated Press

Most of the testimony on Tuesday, Sept. 27, during the trial of the former Albuquerque police officers who shot James Boyd came from an APD officer who was trained to talk to people with mental illnesses. 

Officer Mikal Monette spent a lot of time talking to Boyd, who had a mental illness, before things went south on that day in 2014. Monette had a reputation for being the go-to officer for crisis intervention, he said, and he’d de-escalated hundreds of situations. He told the court he’d never encountered a person he couldn’t talk down.

Associated Press

For most people who’ve seen the footage of Albuquerque Police shooting James Boyd, the scene ends when the shots have been fired. But testimony Monday, Sept. 26, in the trial of former officers Keith Sandy and Dominique Perez looked at the physical impact of those bullets and what happened next. 

Juan Labreche / Associated Press

Police shootings around the country are causing protests and outcry, and video footage from many of these shootings is shedding new light on the moments before a person is killed by law enforcement.

Here in New Mexico, a video ignited demonstrations and drew national attention after two Albuquerque Police Department officers shot and killed James Boyd in March of 2014. They’re now on trial for murder.  

Adolphe Pierre-Louis/Albuquerque Journal

The murder trial for two former Albuquerque police officers who shot and killed James Boyd has been going on all week in district court. 

Juan Labreche / Associated Press

A judge dismissed a juror Wednesday, Sept. 21, in the trial of two police officers facing murder charges for killing James Boyd in 2014. Jurors are not supposed to discuss the trial with anyone.

"You may have noticed that one of your fellow jurors is no longer with us," Judge Alisa Hadfield addressed the court. "And that’s because it was determined that there was a violation of my instructions with regard to not talking about anything involving the case on the telephone with anybody. "

Adolphe Pierre-Louis / Albuquerque Journal

The detective who oversaw the internal investigation into James Boyd’s killing continued testimony Thursday, Sept. 22, in the trial of two Albuquerque police officers charged with second-degree murder. 

Adolphe Pierre Louise / Albuquerque Journal

A judge ruled Wednesday, Sept. 21, that the rifle Dominique Perez used to shoot James Boyd can’t be admitted as evidence in the trial of two police officers facing second-degree murder charges.

Rita Daniels/KUNM

The independent monitor tasked with reviewing reform of the Albuquerque Police Department bashed the department's progress in a special report last week.

AP Photo / Juan Labreche / Associated Press

Defense attorneys in the murder trial of the former Albuquerque police officers who killed James Boyd spent Tuesday trying to pick apart the credibility of an expert witness for the prosecution.

Juan Labreche / Associated Press / Associated Presss

In opening statements in the trial of two former Albuquerque police officers, prosecutor Randi McGinn said the death of homeless camper James Boyd in the Sandia Foothills was no accident or mistake. 

Lawyers delivered opening statements and the Albuquerque Police Department’s chief took the stand in the first day of the trial for two former officers facing murder charges after killing a homeless camper in 2014. 

Rita Daniels / KUNM

After video of police killing a homeless man in Albuquerque went viral in 2014, hundreds of demonstrators began calling for justice and an end to police brutality. A murder trial for those two officers begins Monday, Sept. 19. 

It can be stressful and sometimes scary to be pulled over by a police officer for a traffic stop. Some local actors, writers and artists are planning an interactive role-playing event this weekend at Warehouse 508 in Albuquerque for cops and people from the community to come together to learn about each other and practice how to avoid conflict. It's called CommUNITY Conversation - Positive Policing: Reimagining the Traffic Stop.

Melissa Tso member of the Red Nation and the Party for Socialism and Liberation

Police violence against people of color has been at the forefront of national debate in recent months. And in New Mexico, a group advocating for indigenous concerns called the Red Nation has been active on this issue since the killing of James Boyd two years ago.

MoDOT Photos via Flickr / Creative Commons License

When you think of a drug sting operation, you might think of busting drug dealers. Last week the chief of the Albuquerque Police Department defended a reverse drug sting operation in which undercover officers posed as dealers in early May and arrested mainly homeless people and people with mental health issues who tried to buy drugs.

Victor via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 4/7 8a: The level of crime in our cities makes many New Mexicans feel unsafe. And disturbing violent crimes have dominated our attention recently. Is our system working to make New Mexico safer?

Monitor: Fatal Flaws In Draft APD Policies

Dec 4, 2015
Rita Daniels

The independent monitor responsible for overseeing reform of the Albuquerque Police Department said the new policies APD has drafted so far have been poorly organized and difficult to understand.

Heated Meeting With APD Monitor

Nov 6, 2015
Rita Daniels

The monitor tasked with overseeing reform of the Albuquerque Police Department only gave partial answers to questions from the public Thursday night. The community pressed James Ginger about his large salary, policy changes and the need for healing in the community.

APD Monitor Cancels Meeting With Oversight Board

Nov 5, 2015
Daniels Kulinski via Flickr

The independent monitor, James Ginger, tasked with overseeing reform of the Albuquerque Police Department had two public meetings scheduled Thursday. Ginger’s first one with the Police Oversight Board was canceled at the last minute.

At about one this afternoon, when the meeting was scheduled to commence, David Ring, a member of the oversight board, delivered his apologies to the mostly vacant room.

Rita Daniels

Members of the board tasked with overseeing policy changes for the Albuquerque Police Department are concerned that public trust in the department is eroding.

Judge: New Mexico Police Officers To Stand Trial For Murder

Aug 18, 2015
Screenshot of KOAT-TV livestream of Monday's hearing.

A New Mexico judge has ruled that two Albuquerque police officers must stand trial on murder charges in the fatal, on-duty shooting of a homeless man that sparked angry protest in Albuquerque and helped lead to reforms.

Screenshot of KOAT-TV livestream of Monday's hearing.

A judge heard testimony Monday in a preliminary hearing for a case against two Albuquerque police officers who fatally shot homeless camper James Boyd last year. The judge will determine whether or not the officers, who face murder charges, will go to trial.

Pages