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Floyd E. Vasquez Jr. and Elaine Baumgartel

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
9:41 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Police Press On With Search For Suspect

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

The scene in suburban Boston early Friday was chaotic. Police were going house to house in Watertown as they searched for "suspect No. 2" in the bombings.

Around the Nation
7:20 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Investigators Want Answers To Critical Questions

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

One suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings is dead, and authorities want to capture the other one alive. Steve Inskeep and David Greene talk to NPR's Carrie Johnson and Tom Gjelten and Curt Nickisch of member station WBUR about the latest developments.

Around the Nation
7:09 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Authorities Identify Boston Marathon Suspects

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

To understand the scope of the major story we're following this morning, you have to imagine something like a camera zooming in and out of focus. We zoom in on a residence in Watertown, Massachusetts, and then pull back again to a metropolitan area that is largely shut down today. We pull back even further and talk about international terrorism and connections to the country, or rather to Russia and to the Russian Republic of Chechnya.

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Around the Nation
6:57 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Boston Bombing On White House And Russia's Radar

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

Steve Inskeep speaks with NPR's Scott Horsley, who has the White House perspective on news of the Boston Marathon bombings manhunt. NPR has confirmed that the two suspects were from Chechnya. For insights on that region, Morning Edition talks with Matt Rojansky, deputy director of the Russia and Eurasia program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Police In Quiet Boston Suburb Chase Bombing Suspects

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Mark Sideris, president of the Watertown town council, about events that unfolded overnight.

Research News
4:55 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Did You Notice This Seemed To Be A Crazy News Week?

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, this investigation and manhunt that Dina and Steve just spoke about, they come in the wake of that marathon bombing in Boston Monday. In Texas, we had this deadly explosion at a fertilizer plant. That is a lot of tragic news to digest in a week. And there is a human tendency to think that these events are somehow connected, even when they're not.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:55 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Boston Police Believe They've Killed 1 Marathon Bomber

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 11:32 am

Parts of the Boston metropolitan area were full of police activity Thursday night amid a hunt for persons wanted in connection with the bombings at the Boston Marathon. David Greene and Steve Inskeep talk to NPR's Dina Temple-Raston and Fred Bever of member station WBUR, who are in Boston, for an update on what's known regarding the investigation.

Shots - Health News
3:42 am
Fri April 19, 2013

With Bird Flu, 'Right Now, Anything Is Possible'

A health worker collects pigeons from a trap at People's Square in Shanghai, China, earlier this month. So far, workers have tested more than 48,000 animals for the H7N9 flu virus.
ChinaFotoPress Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 7:27 pm

An international dream team of flu experts assembled in China today.

Underscoring the urgency that public health agencies feel about the emergence of a new kind of bird flu, the team is headed by Dr. Keiji Fukuda, the World Health Organization's top influenza scientist.

Before he left Geneva, Fukuda explained the wide-open nature of the investigation in an interview with NPR.

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StoryCorps
12:46 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Losing A Leg, But Gaining A Sense Of Purpose

Jack Richmond and his daughter, Reagan, visit StoryCorps in Knoxville, Tenn.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 7:30 pm

In 1987, Jack Richmond was driving a forklift at work when the vehicle overturned onto him, crushing his leg below the knee. His daughter, Reagan, was just 2 months old at the time.

"Initially when they told me I would lose my leg, I was in denial and disbelief and kind of like, 'What, why? Can't you fix it?' " Jack tells Reagan in a visit to StoryCorps in Knoxville, Tenn. "But it just couldn't be saved."

"And you had a brand new daughter — me," says Reagan, now 25. "What were you thinking?"

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Latin America
12:46 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Post-Chavez Venezuela Grows More, Not Less, Polarized

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition presidential candidate Henrique Capriles protest in the area of Altamira, in Caracas, capital of Venezuela, on Monday.
Mauricio Valenzuela Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 6:37 am

Under the rule of its late president, Hugo Chavez, Venezuela became a nation sharply divided between those who supported his self-styled socialist revolution and those who opposed it.

But after a disputed presidential election in which Chavez's deputy was ruled the winner by a razor-thin margin, the country appears more polarized than ever.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:44 am
Fri April 19, 2013

As Florida Bill Looks To Aid Feral Cats, Opponents Claw Back

The Miami-based Cat Network operates a program that traps, neuters and releases feral cats back to their colonies. A bill before the Florida Legislature would offer legal protection to those programs.
Greg Allen NPR

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 4:59 pm

In state legislatures around the country, lawmakers are debating important subjects — education reform, election laws, gun control and abortion. But in Florida, one of the hottest issues to come before the Legislature this term involves cats.

There, lawmakers are considering a contentious bill that would offer legal protection to groups that trap, neuter and return feral cats to their colonies.

An Alternative To Shelters

Read more
U.S.
10:22 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Search And Rescue Ongoing After Texas Plant Explosion

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

We're learning more about last night's fire in the Texas town of West. The fire started in a fertilizer plant, and a father in a vehicle nearby was taking video of the flames when the plant exploded.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Are you OK?

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD: Yeah.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: You OK?

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD: Yeah. I can't hear.

Read more
U.S.
10:22 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Obama Visits Boston Service As Investigation Continues

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. We're listening to a memorial service in Boston for victims of the Boston Marathon.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BOSTON CHILDREN'S CHORUS: (Singing in foreign language)

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U.S.
10:22 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Texas Town Staggered By Massive Explosion

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All this morning, we have been following the aftermath of a massive explosion at a fertilizer plant in Texas last night. When volunteer firefighters in the city of West, Texas - that's about 20 miles north of Waco - first arrived to battle a fire at the plant, they encountered a disaster in the making.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're told this fire was burning at the site of a couple of storage tanks, each of which had the capacity to carry 12,000 gallons of ammonia.

Read more
U.S.
8:27 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Eyewitnesses To Texas Explosion Describe The Scene

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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U.S.
8:20 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Police Say Fires Burning But Under Control After Texas Blast

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The nation's attention turns this morning to a tiny city in Texas. It's simply called West. It is the site of a fertilizer plant from which a message went out to police radio last night.

UNIDENTIFIED DISPATCHER: There has been an explosion on the fire scene. There are firefighters down at this time. Again, there has been an explosion on the fire scene. There are firefighters down at this time.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Asia
5:13 am
Thu April 18, 2013

South Korean Public Broadcaster Bans Psy Video

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. There may be only one place in the world you will not hear Psy. His video "Gangnam Style" was seen 1.5 billion times, including several thousand in my household. His new video, "Gentleman," has 142 million views so far but is not on South Korean Public Broadcasting.

In that video, Psy dances up the street and kicks an orange cone that says no parking. South Korea's KBS says abusing public property does not meet its standards. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
5:08 am
Thu April 18, 2013

App Helps Icelanders Avoid Dating Family

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Dating can be tough in a small country like Iceland. There are only 320,000 people and many of them are distant relatives. So the government came up with an idea. They created a genealogy Web site. There's even a Smartphone app. Just tap phones with your date. And if you happen to share a grandparent, you'll get an alert. If a date is out of the question, the app does also track relatives' birthdays and so you can send them a card.

The Record
3:56 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Coachella's Hometown Aims To Cash In On Fest's Rising Tide

The crowd at Coachella on Sunday.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images for Coachella

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 2:30 pm

Like many California cities hit hard by the real estate crash, Indio (near Palm Springs) has been forced to make steep cutbacks to avoid bankruptcy. But unlike other cities, Indio hosts the highest-grossing music festival in the world — Coachella — which wraps up this weekend. It has made city leaders eager to capitalize on Coachella's riches.

Sam Torres, plumber by day, Indio city councilman by night, says he was prepared to become the most hated man in the city, and he very well may have achieved that goal. His offense? Proposing a 6 percent tax on Coachella tickets.

Read more
The Record
3:56 am
Thu April 18, 2013

The Diverse Influence Of The 2013 Rock Hall Inductees

Public Enemy on stage in 1988. The group will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of fame Thursday.
Suzie Gibbons Redferns/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

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Business
3:56 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Despite Flaws, Harvard Economists Stand By Research

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Two prominent Harvard economists have admitted there are errors in an influential paper they wrote on government debt. This paper was widely cited in recent budget debates. But the economists insist their mistakes do not significantly change their research.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: In their 2010 paper, Ken Rogoff and Carmen Rinehart argued that economic growth falls significantly when a country's debt level rises above 90 percent of its Gross Domestic Product or GDP.

Read more
Pop Culture
1:26 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Cleveland Celebrates Superman, Its Hometown Hero

Panels from Action Comics No. 1, the first Superman comic, adorn the site of illustrator Joe Shuster's former apartment building, long since demolished.
Brian Bull/WCPN

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 11:39 am

April 18, 2013, is a big day for Superman. The Man of Steel, more powerful than a locomotive, turns 75. Most of us know Superman's story — faster than a speeding bullet, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound.

Less well-known is that the superhero is not native to the lost world of Krypton, nor the rural Kansas burg of Smallville. Superman is Cleveland's native son — at least as far as the city's residents are concerned.

Read more
The Picture Show
1:17 am
Thu April 18, 2013

In 'Which Way,' A War Photographer In His Element

Spc. Tad Donoho screams with pain in 2008 after being administered a "pink belly" for his birthday in Korengal Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan. Each member of the platoon strikes his stomach until it begins to bruise, hence the name pink belly. From the book Infidel.
Tim Hetherington Magnum Photos

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

At the 2011 Academy Awards, the film Restrepo was among the documentaries nominated for an Oscar. It follows an American platoon on a remote mountaintop in what was, at the time, the most dangerous place in Afghanistan.

To make the film, writer Sebastian Junger teamed up with British photojournalist Tim Hetherington — who, walking the red carpet that night at the Oscars, might as well have been a young actor straight out of central casting: tall, handsome, charismatic.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:07 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Napster Billionaire Spends Big On Upcoming Wedding

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with good luck to Sean Parker and his bride-to-be. She's a singer; he's a Facebook billionaire and founder of Napster. Mr. Parker committed $10 million to their wedding. He paid for waterfalls, bridges and ancient ruins created for the occasion. Guests will wear outfits created by the costume designer from "Lord of the Rings."

Europe
5:02 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Resignation Letter Is Good Enough To Eat

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Chris Holmes worked at a London airport, but his true love was always making cakes. So Holmes decided to quit his job to run his own bake shop, which brings us to his resignation letter. He wrote it on a cake with icing. He said he wanted more time with his family. He wished his colleagues well. It took two hours, more time than he had ever spent on a birthday message or anniversary wish. A photo of his work went viral, publicity that he really felt was icing on the cake.

NPR Story
2:28 am
Wed April 17, 2013

FBI Encourages Public To Turn Over What They May Know

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The special agent in charge of the FBI Boston office hopes someone somewhere heard something that will point to a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATEMENT)

Read more
NPR Story
2:28 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Adding Security Along Marathons Would Be Herculean Task

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, the twin bombings at the Boston Marathon struck at a very special type of sporting event. Marathons have been called the most democratic of sports, with the fewest physical barriers between athlete and spectator.

NPR's Mike Pesca examines whether the attack could permanently damage that accessibility.

Read more
Code Switch
2:26 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Seeking Oakland's Soul In The 'New Oakland'

A DJ plays for a crowded street at Oakland's Art Murmur celebration in February.
David Kashevaroff

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 6:17 pm

Oakland, Calif., was once a hub of African-American culture on the West Coast.

In the 1940s and '50s, Oakland was home to an entertainment corridor nicknamed The Harlem of the West. In the '60s, the city gave birth to the Black Panther Party. By the '80s, black folks made up nearly half of Oakland's population.

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Animals
12:56 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Lionfish Attacking Atlantic Ocean Like A Living Oil Spill

Lionfish, like this one spotted in the Bahamas, are a nonnative predatory fish that can decimate native fish populations.
Cammy Clark MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 11:45 am

A gluttonous predator is power-eating its way through reefs from New York to Venezuela. It's the lionfish.

And although researchers are coming up with new ways to protect some reefs from the flamboyant maroon-striped fish, they have no hope of stopping its unparalleled invasion.

Lad Akins has scuba dived in the vibrant reefs of the Bahamas for many years. But when he returned a couple years ago, he saw almost no fish smaller than his hand.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
12:55 am
Wed April 17, 2013

The Pitch For More No. 42s

Jackie Robinson during spring training at Vero Beach, Fla., in March 1956. It would be Robinson's 10th and last year with the Brooklyn Dodgers.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Yet another movie about Jackie Robinson arrived as baseball held its annual commemorative celebration of No. 42, but officials of the game are fretting over the fact that only 8 1/2 percent of current major leaguers are black.

Given that African-Americans only constitute about 13 percent of the U.S. population, and that rarely do we have any industry or school system or community population that correlates exactly to the whole country's racial or ethnic makeup, baseball's somewhat smaller black cohort hardly seems like an issue to agonize over.

Read more

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