Democracy Now

Weekdays 4:00PM - 5:00PM
Amy Goodman

Democracy Now! is a national, daily, independent, award-winning news program hosted by journalists Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez. 

Democracy Now!’s War and Peace Report provides our audience with access to people and perspectives rarely heard in the U.S.corporate-sponsored media, including independent and international journalists, ordinary people from around the world who are directly affected by U.S. foreign policy, grassroots leaders and peace activists, artists, academics and independent analysts. In addition, Democracy Now! hosts real debates–debates between people who substantially disagree, such as between the White House or the Pentagon spokespeople on the one hand, and grassroots activists on the other.

 

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Podcasts

  • Friday, March 27, 2015 6:34am
    As tens of thousands gather for the World Social Forum in Tunis, Tunisia, we speak to one of the most prominent radical thinkers in Africa -- the Egyptian-born economist Samir Amin. He is considered one of Africa's leading political economists and was one of the pioneers of describing modern human history from the perspective of the Third World, arguing that the countries of the South were not latecomers to capitalism, but were integrated into the global economy from the start in a position of dependency to the rich, industrialized North. He is presently director of the Third World Forum in Dakar, Senegal -- considered a precursor to the World Social Forum -- and since 1997, has been the chair of the World Forum for Alternatives. Amin has written thousands of journal articles and opinion pieces as well as more than 30 books -- with titles such as "Imperialism and Unequal Development," "Global History: A View from the South" and "The Liberal Virus: Permanent War and the Americanization of the World." The historian Ama Biney says Amin is "an intellectual titan in the canon of African radical thought."
  • Friday, March 27, 2015 6:23am
    As Saudi Arabia and Egypt threaten to send ground troops into Yemen, we look at the roots of the crisis. While many analysts have described the fighting as a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran, journalist Iona Craig says the fighting stems from a domestic conflict. "People try to frame this as an Iran versus Saudi kind of battle, which it has now become. But it is very much because of domestic politics," explains Iona Craig, who recently spent four years reporting from Sana'a. We also speak to Brian Whitaker, former Middle East editor at The Guardian, about the decades-old history of Saudi intervention in Yemen.
  • Friday, March 27, 2015 6:13am
    A Saudi-led aerial bombing campaign has entered its second day in Yemen. The Saudi-led airstrikes are intended to thwart the advance of Shiite Houthi rebels after they seized control of the capital Sana'a last year and deposed President Abdu Rabbu Mansour Hadi last month. On Thursday, Hadi left his refuge in Aden for Saudi Arabia. At least 39 civilians have reportedly been killed so far in the airstrikes. Amnesty International reports the dead include at least six children under the age of 10. Saudi's bombing campaign has been backed by the United States, Gulf states, Egypt, Turkey, Pakistan and Sudan. We go to Sana'a to speak with Farea Al-Muslimi, a visiting scholar at Carnegie Middle East Center. He recently tweeted: "I'm a 25 year old Yemeni man. I've seen at least 15 wars in my country. I don't need more. I need some help and education & economy; not guns."
  • Friday, March 27, 2015 6:00am
    Yemen: 39 Civilians Killed in Saudi-Led Bombings, U.S. Airstrikes Cause Shiite Militias to Leave Tikrit Fight, Report: Co-Pilot Who Crashed Plane Had History of Depression, House Passes Medicare Bill in Rare Bipartisan Move, Report: U.S. Soldiers, Contractors Sexually Abused 54 Children in Colombia, Mexico: Parents Mark 6 Months Since Disappearance of 43 Students, Indiana Enacts "Religious Freedom" Bill Seen as Anti-LGBT, Indiana Allows Needle Exchange in Response to HIV Outbreak, Kentucky Overhauls Approach to Heroin Addiction, Ohio Lawmaker Discloses Her Abortion, Denounces "Inhuman" Anti-Choice Bill, Video: Monsanto Lobbyist Claims Glyphosate Safe to Drink, Refuses to Drink It, Illinois: National Guardsman, Cousin Arrested on Terror Charges, Wisconsin: Man Suspected of Killing State Trooper Tied to White Supremacy, Michigan: Video Shows "Robocop" Beating Unarmed Auto Worker in the Head, Ferguson Protesters Win Curbs on Police Tear Gas Use
  • Thursday, March 26, 2015 6:49am
    The nation's top museums are facing calls to cut ties with billionaire funders who profit from global warming. In an open letter, a coalition of climate scientists, museum experts and environmental groups says science and natural history museums should stop accepting money from fossil fuel corporations and individual donors like the Koch brothers. Koch Industries has extensive energy industry holdings and has funded climate denial. David Koch is a board member of both the American Museum of Natural History and the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. One of the most controversial exhibits is a Koch-backed installation at the Smithsonian that promotes the theory that humankind evolved in response to climate change. The letter is the creation of a different kind of museum -- the new, mobile Natural History Museum, which seeks to "highlight the socio-political forces that shape nature." We are joined by Beka Economopoulos, co-founder and director of the new Natural History Museum, who coordinated the letter to 330 science and natural history museums, and by James Powell, one of the scientists who signed the open letter. Powell is a geochemist, former president of the Franklin Institute and former president and director of the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum.
Special Event
2:33 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

An Evening With Amy Goodman