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Local News
4:26 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

PeacePal Benefit Features Promoter of Social Healing

Photo via Peacepal

Peace begins with me.  It’s a familiar refrain… and it’s the title of tonight’s benefit event put on by the Albuquerque non-profit PeacePals.  The organization promotes international correspondence and service projects. 

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Theater
1:00 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

'The Mountaintop' Opens On Broadway

Thursday is opening night for Katori Hall's Olivier Award-winning play about Martin Luther King Jr. and his encounter with a chamber maid in Memphis the night before his assassination. Starring Samuel L. Jackson and Angela Bassett, The Mountaintop is probably the most anticipated play of the fall season.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

Epstein Leaves Red Sox For Cubs

Boston Red Sox General Manager Theo Epstein is leaving his hometown team to take the reins of the Chicago Cubs. He departs after a disastrous season, but he will be remembered for making history. The youngest ever general manager in major league baseball designed the teams that won two World Series, Boston's first since 1918. Now he'll try to make Wrigley's loveable losers into champions.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

Egypt Helped Broker Israel-Hamas Prisoner Swap

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 9:48 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: Next week, Israel and Hamas are expected to swap more than a thousand Palestinian prisoners for one captured Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit. It will likely happen on Egyptian soil. Egypt helped broker the deal and had been working on it for the past couple of years. There were occasional reports of progress that didn't pan out.

So, how was it that success came through the new Egyptian military regime, which replaced Israel's old ally, Hosni Mubarak? And at a time when Israeli-Egyptian relations are worse than they've been in decades.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

Rajaratnam Sentenced To 11 Years

Convicted insider trader Raj Rajaratnam was sentenced to 11 years in prison Thursday. Rajaratnam was a founder of the Galleon Group hedge fund.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

A Look At Slovakia's Vote Approve The Bailout Deal

Robert Siegel speaks with Lucia Virostkova, a Slovak journalist based in Bratislava. She blogs for the EUobserver.com. She describes how the Slovakian parliamentary vote to join the eurozone bailout of banks brought the Slovakian government down — and caused the 2014 elections be moved to March.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

Blackberry Manufacturer Faces Major Problems

After a major service outage this week, Research In Motion, or RIM, the company that makes Blackberries, faces major problems. The outage, which left millions of customers all over the world without service for up to three days, comes on the heels of a tablet flop and an embarrassing role in this summer's U.K. riots. Guy Raz talks with Chip Cummins of the Wall Street Journal about the future of the company.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

Hero Of Computer World Dennis Ritchie Dies

An unsung hero of the computer world has died. Dennis Ritchie created the C language — which is the foundation for most computers, including the iPad and iPhone.

The Record
1:00 pm
Wed October 12, 2011

Death Metal, Vernacular And Tradition: The Music Scene In Taiwan

A Moving Sound. YunYa Hsieh stands at the center, Scott Praire sits to the right.

Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 4:27 pm

Taiwan might be known to most Americans for its export economy, but it's also been importing musical styles — from avant garde jazz to hip-hop. I first learned about Taiwan's thriving music scene from Joshua Samuel Brown. He's a travel writer who authored the last two editions of Lonely Planet: Taiwan.

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Remembrances
1:00 pm
Wed October 12, 2011

Gay Rights Movement Pioneer Dies

Frank Kameny, a pioneer in the gay rights movement, died Tuesday at 86. In 1957, Kameny was fired from his job as an astronomer for the U.S. government because he was homosexual. He fought his dismissal in court for years and in the 1960s, began picketing outside the White House, calling for equal rights for gays and lesbians. In 2009, the government issued him a formal apology for his firing.

National Security
1:00 pm
Wed October 12, 2011

White House Tries To Increase Pressure On Iran

A day after announcing they had uncovered an Iranian terror plot — the Obama administration is moving quickly to try to drum up more international pressure on the Iranian regime. But some Iran watchers are raising doubts about the US storyline — and wonder if the US can get the sort of diplomatic mileage it wants out of this case.

Economy
1:00 pm
Wed October 12, 2011

Could The Volcker Rule Rein In Propriety Trading?

American banks have, for years, been accustomed to making risky bets — not only on behalf of clients but also with their own money. But many are now protesting, and preparing for, a new measure in the works that would reign in what's called proprietary trading: The Volcker Rule. Robert Siegel talks with Ben Protess of the New York Times about a new rule intended to reign in this behavior on the part of banks.

Law
1:00 pm
Wed October 12, 2011

Cook County Investigates Gacy Cold Cases

The Cook County sheriff's office in Illinois has launched a new effort to identify eight unidentified victims of mass murderer John Wayne Gacy. The department wants relatives of men who disappeared between 1970 and 1978 to participate in saliva tests to compare their DNA with that of the victims' bones.

Law
1:00 pm
Wed October 12, 2011

Topeka, Kan., Repeals Domestic Violence Law

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 4:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

GUY RAZ, host: And I'm Guy Raz.

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Europe
2:52 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Malta Passes Measure To Expand Bailout Fund

The parliament in Malta passed a controversial measure to expand Europe's bailout fund late on Monday. But to many young people in the tiny Mediterranean island nation, the question was never really in doubt. Despite all its economic problems, they see their future in the eurozone.

Europe
1:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Greek Debt Crisis Leads To Dexia fail

Only a few months ago, the bank Dexia was rated one of the most stable in Europe. But, within the past few days, it's become the first casualty of the Greek debt crisis, saved only by interventions by the Belgian and French governments. Robert Siegel talks with Stanley Pignal, Brussels correspondent for the Financial Times, for more.

Europe
1:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Slovakia's Parliament Complicates Bailout Plans

Slovakia, the second poorest of the 17 nations that use the euro, has complicated plans to help Greece and other debt-ravaged countries. The Slovakian parliament was due to be the last to approve the expansion of the eurozone bailout fund. But internal divisions in the ruling coalition caused the government to collapse instead.

Election 2012
1:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

GOP Presidential Hopefuls Face Off At Dartmouth

Robert Siegel talks with NPR's Mara Liasson about Tuesday night's GOP presidential debate on the campus of Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Israel, Hamas Agree To Prisoner Exchange

Originally published on Wed February 15, 2012 11:14 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Letters: Tim DeChristopher's River Trip

Originally published on Tue October 11, 2011 4:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And I'm Guy Raz. Our inbox was full of love for a story we aired yesterday. Alex Chadwick, a former colleague of ours, told us about his summer trip down the rapids of the Green and Colorado Rivers.

TIM DECHRISTOPHER: How do you think we should ride?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Hey, diddle diddle. I mean...

DECHRISTOPHER: What does that mean?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Right down the middle.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Holder: U.S. Thwarts Alleged Assassination Plot

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Across The Nation, 'Wall Street' Protests Continue

The "Occupy Wall Street" protest movement that was born in New York's financial district is now in its fourth week and has spread to scores of other cities. The "Occupy Wall Street" affiliated protests continue in Boston, where arrests were made overnight. Chicago and Los Angeles also saw protests. .

Sports
1:00 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

A Look At The NBA's Labor Troubles

Guy Raz talks with NPR sports correspondent Mike Pesca about the numbers behind the NBA's labor troubles.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Mon October 10, 2011

Egyptian Christians Hold Funeral For Victims Of Clash

Christians protest outside St. Mark's Cathedral in Cairo, a day after 25 people, mostly Christians, died in clashes with Egyptian security forces.

Mahmud Hams AFP/Getty Images

Ormany Makary's coffin teetered precariously as throngs of mourners carried the 25-year-old truck driver's body to the front of Abbasiya Cathedral, chanting "Raise up your head, you are Copts!"

But his fiancee, Saafa Gaber, couldn't.

Makary was among the 25 people killed in a night of clashes between mostly Coptic Christian protesters and Egyptian soldiers.

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National Security
1:00 pm
Mon October 10, 2011

Virus Infects Drone Network

A few weeks ago, at Creech Air Force base in Nevada, computer security experts came upon a virus in their network. The virus was recording every keystroke made by Air Force pilots who remotely operate Predator and Reaper drones that fly over war zones. And so far, they can't seem to wipe the virus from the system. Guy Raz talks to Noah Shachtman, contributing editor at Wired magazine, who first reported the story.

Law
1:00 pm
Mon October 10, 2011

Climate Activist Visits Wilderness Before Prison Term

Tim DeChristopher was to go to prison, convicted of disrupting a government sale of oil and gas leases. He called his actions an act off civil disobedience against climate change. Prosecutors called them felonies. Ahead of his confinement, DeChristopher wanted to go on a final wilderness adventure.

World
1:00 pm
Mon October 10, 2011

French, Germans Show Different Attitudes To Crisis

A funny thing about bailouts in Europe: The Germans appear to be worried sick about them, because they'll have to pay. But the French don't seem too concerned, even though they'll be paying too — and they can't afford it.

Music
10:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Jonathan Wilson: Making Like Thoreau, In Song

Jonathan Wilson's new album is titled Gentle Spirit.

Nick Walker Courtesy of the artist

Record producer Jonathan Wilson recorded his new album Gentle Spirit during little slivers of time when the artists he was working with — among them songwriter Jackson Browne and the rock band Dawes — were on break. The project took him four years to finish, and it's the musical equivalent of a landscape painting.

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Middle East
1:00 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

At Least 19 Dead In Egypt Riots

Clashes between Coptic Christian protesters and the Egyptian military in Cairo on Sunday left at least 19 people dead and more than 100 wounded, according to official counts. The violence erupted after the Christians were marching to protest what they claim was an attack on a church in southern Egypt by radical Muslims.

Strange News
12:41 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Florida Family's Antique Legacy: Pickled Cucumber

James Boyle's great-great-grandmother bottled this pickle in 1876, and the family has been passing it down ever since.

James Boyle

Originally published on Sun October 9, 2011 4:39 pm

Here's a partial list of things that happened in 1876:

It was, of course, the nation's 100th birthday. George Armstrong Custer met his fate at the Battle of Little Bighorn. Alexander Graham Bell made the first phone call. A giant squid, 18 feet long, washed up on a beach in Newfoundland.

And James Boyle's great-great-grandmother grew a very special cucumber in her Illinois garden. She put the sprouting vine in an old medicine bottle, so the cucumber grew inside it.

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