KUNM

Megan Kamerick

Morning Edition Host

Megan has been a journalist for 22 years and worked at business weeklies in San Antonio, New Orleans and Albuquerque. She first came to KUNM as a phone volunteer on the pledge drive in 2005. That led to volunteering on Women’s Focus and Weekend Edition, the Global Music Show - and her job as Morning Edition Host - fulfilling a long-held wish to learn radio.

In 2012, she moved into television with New Mexico PBS where she produced “Public Square” and “New Mexico in Focus.” Megan has produced stories for National Public Radio, Latino USA and Marketplace. She’s passionate about getting women’s voices into media and is the former president of the Journalism & Women Symposium. Her TED talk on women and media has more than 272,000 views. She’s the vice president of communications for the Society of Professional Journalists’ Rio Grande Chapter. In the spare time she manages to scrape together she goes hiking with her husband and dog, seeks out cool cultural happenings, goes to movies and travels.

Ways to Connect

  

  On this month's show we talk with the keynote speakers at the Black Cultural Conference, which takes place Sept. 21-23, 2017 at the University of New Mexico.

Courtesy New Mexico PBS

LISTEN: Valerie Plame worked for years as a covert operative in the CIA, focusing on nuclear proliferation issues. That all changed in 2003 when her husband, Joseph Wilson, wrote an opinion piece questioning the intelligence the Bush Administration was using the justify a war with Iraq. An official in the Administration leaked Plame’s identity to a sympathetic columnist and she resigned from the CIA, leaving that career behind. She chronicled her life as a spy and how it ended in the book "Fair Game," which was also made into a film starring Naomi Watts and Sean Penn.

Courtesy Mark Childs

Route 66, which stretched from Chicago to Los Angeles, endures in the minds of many as a road that represented the freedom of jumping in a car and heading West for adventure. The signs along Route 66 were an integral part of that experience. Many of these distinctive signs along New Mexico stretches of Route 66 were created here in Albuquerque by Zeon Signs.

Noah Loverbear via Wikimedia / Creative Commons

August 12, 2017: Anniversary of Peace People founding; Google grapples with fallout from firing employee over memo criticizing diversity; Texas House passes bill requiring separate insurance for abortion; woman ejected over breastfeeding at Victoria and Albert Museum in London; negative political ads hurt female candidates; Nepal tries to outlaw practice of menstrual seclusion; "Hidden Figures" inspires new State Department program; Jordan repeals laws pardoning rapists who marry their victims; Indian women use Twitter to criticize lawmaker who says women shouldn't go out late if they want

Courtesy 516 ARTS

 Around the world pollinators are in crisis. That includes bees, butterflies, moths and more. This has potentially drastic consequences for all of us since more than two thirds of our food crops rely on pollinators, according to the United Nations, and even more of our flowering plants. A new show opening August 19 at 516 ARTS in Albuquerque explores the idea of cross pollination through art with the idea of spurring awareness and action. 

Guests:

The Refugee Well-Being Project brings together newly arrived families in Albuquerque with students at the University of New Mexico. Together they learn from, and teach, one another as students help them meet the challenges of settling in a new country. On this episode we talk with staff as well as a student and the woman she worked with from Afghanistan.  

Guests:

Michele K. Short/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

KUNM Call In Show  07/20 8a: At a time when New Mexico's economy is struggling, at least one sector is booming: The film and television industry. The state has become a center of production thanks to generous tax incentives, a big crew base, and large studios and sound stages. 

Marc Romanelli, International Folk Art Market 2016

For many artists in developing communities, creativity is abundant, but cash is not.

In Sarawak on the Island of Borneo, Senia Jugi learned at a young age to weave using bamboo, bembem, arrowroot and rattan. Her ethnic group, the Iban, use baskets for all kinds of everyday tasks as well as ritual occasions. She's advanced far beyond those early years and her works have received the UNESCO-World Crafts Council Award of Excellence.

Jabulile Nala began making pottery when she was 13 and was taught by her mother and grandmother. But the family legacy stretches back for over 100 years and the Nala name is synonymous with Zulu ceramics. The work of her mother, Nesta Nala, is in major collections around the world. But it can be a struggle to continue this legacy without access to markets beyond their village.

Santa Fe International Folk Art Market

The Indian art form of painting ritual designs on the floors and walls of houses, called “Madhubani” gradually moved from inside homes to the wider world on paper and canvas.

One-hundred sixty artists from 53 countries will gather in Santa Fe this weekend for the 14th Annual Santa Fe International Folk Art Market. Many will earn the majority of their income at the market and the proceeds help communities achieve economic independence. 

Julia Lindemalm via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons

July 8, 2017: Remembering Simone Veil; Photos may reveal clues on Amelia Earhart; Street harassment study reveals unexpected findings; women reveal endemic harassment in technology industry; Honduras activists protest gender violence; Canada holds hearing on missing and murdered indigenous women; activists call on Tanzanian president to lift ban on pregnant teens returning to school; Sweden plans women-only rock festival; remembering Susanne Burks

Lisa Phillips, BLM Las Cruces District Rangeland Management Specialist via Wikimedia / Bureau of Land Management

KUNM Call In Show 6/29 8a: President Donald Trump has called for a review of more than two dozen national monuments that were designated under the American Antiquities Act of 1906. That includes the Rio Grande del Norte Monument near Taos and the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Monument near Las Cruces. Advocates say the sites need protection and have boosted tourism in rural areas. Ranchers and others worry about more federal limits on land use.

Media outlets have pointed out several examples this week of prominent women being interrupted and talked over by male colleagues. Megan Kamerick talks with Michele Weldon, editorial director of Take The Lead, about her article "Don't Shhhh Me!

In this episode we speak with Claudia Isaac. She’s an associate professor in the school of architecture and planning at the University of New Mexico. She received the 2nd Annual Community Engaged Research Lectureship Award from the Office of Vice President for Research. Her work has focused on community engaged scholarship & practice in the areas of affordable housing, neighborhood planning and land use, community economic development, and metropolitan redevelopment.

Credit: Null Value / Creative Commons

5 Fatally Shot In Northern New Mexico; Gunman ArrestedThe Associated Press & The Santa Fe New Mexican

Authorities have arrested a man who they say fatally shot five people in New Mexico on Thursday.

Massachusetts General Hospital and Draper Labs via Wikimedia / Creative Commons

LISTEN: May is Mental Health Awareness Month. In 2014 voters in Bernalillo County voted in favor of a tax for increased mental health services. This came after the shooting by police of James Boyd, a homeless man who had schizophrenia, as well as other shootings by police of people who struggled with mental illness. The tax went into effect in 2015 and is providing up to $20 million annually for new programs through the Bernalillo County Behavioral Health Initiative.

Author Kate Moore will speak on Monday May 15 at 7 p.m. at the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History in Albuquerque about her book “Radium Girls: The Dark Story Of America’s Shining Women.” It tells the story of the women employed to paint watches and clocks with radium-based paint, starting in World War I. At the time radium was considered a miracle element that many touted would improve health. These women became the first proof of just how deadly radium was.

Courtesy Project ECHO

In many parts of the world, including rural New Mexico, it's difficult for patients to access specialists in health care. But instead of moving more providers to those areas, what if doctors and other health professionals who already work in those communities could gain the knowledge and expertise they need to help their patients? That's the idea behind Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcome, or Project ECHO. It launched in 2003 at the University of New Mexico to respond to the growing Hepatitis C crisis around New Mexico.

Every day in this country students come to school without a way to pay for lunch. Right now it's up to the school to decide what happens next.

Since new legislation out of New Mexico on so-called lunch shaming made headlines, we've heard a lot about how schools react.

Matthew Rutledge / Creative Commons via Flickr

US Prosecutors Are Geared To Target Border CrossersAssociated Press

Through Republican and Democratic presidential administrations, the top federal prosecutor on California's border with Mexico has resisted going after people caught entering the United States illegally on their first try and instead targeted smugglers and serial offenders.

Pussy Riot / used with permission

The Russian punk band and art collective Pussy Riot brought their Revolution tour to Albuquerque in March. One of their original members stopped by the studios at New Mexico PBS to talk about the group’s work opposing war and oppression.

Moisés Gonzáles

We often associate slavery with the American South. But it was actually common in many places in our history, including New Mexico. Native Americans who were captives and raised in Hispanic families became known as Genizaros. They assimilated into New Mexico society and after being freed they were also given land grants in places like Abiqui, Belen and Carnuel on the frontier between Spanish settlements and Native tribes.

Creative Commons

New Mexico Ethics Commission Proposal Clears SenateThe Associated Press

New Mexico voters could be asked next year to create an independent political ethics commission in the wake of a recent string of corruption scandals.

The state Senate voted 30-9 Thursday in favor of a proposed constitutional amendment that calls for creating a seven-member body to investigate and sanction ethics violations. The House must sign off on Senate revisions before the amendment goes to a statewide ballot initiative in November 2018.

Jim Legans Jr. via Flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

APD Investigator Says Officer Violated Hawkes’ Rights – Albuquerque Journal

A police sergeant investigating the 2014 shooting death of Mary Hawkes said her constitutional rights were violated and officers mishandled evidence.

Pixabay / CREATIVE COMMONS

New Mexico Senate Backs Veto Override On Teacher Sick LeaveThe Associated Press

The New Mexico Senate has voted to override a veto by New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez of a bill that would have allowed teachers to take more than three days of annual sick leave without being penalized on performance evaluations.

Bykst via Pixabay / Creative Commons

New Mexico Tops Latest Unemployment ListThe Associated Press

The latest figures from state and federal labor officials show New Mexico has the nation's highest unemployment rate at 6.7 percent.

Killbox via Flickr / Creative Commons

Mail Theft Concerns Prompt Hiring Of More Postal Inspectors – The Associated Press

With New Mexico's largest metropolitan area being plagued by mail thefts, the U.S. Postal Service has agreed to add two more postal inspectors in the Albuquerque office.

publicdomainpictures.net / public domain

New Mexico Tells School Kids: No Lunch Money, No ProblemThe Associated Press

A bill to ensure that New Mexico children are served school meals even if their parents do not pay on time has been approved by the state Senate.

Creative Commons

Sandoval County Settles Jail Suicide Suit For $1.8 Million – The Associated Press & KOB

Sandoval County has agreed to pay $1.8 million to settle a lawsuit stemming from a jail inmate who killed herself after leaving her isolation cell.

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