Megan Kamerick

Reporter

Freelance Reporter and Contributor to Women's Focus.

Ways To Connect

William P. Gottlieb and Creative Commons

Megan Kamerick talks with filmmaker Carol Bash about her new documentary  "Mary Lou Williams: The Lady Who Swings the Band."

Mary Lou Williams was one of the great innovators in jazz. She was a pianist and composer who shaped this music and mentored many of its greatest artists. And like jazz, she improvised, adapting with each passing decade. But there are still many people who don't know anything about her. Filmmaker Carol Bash traces the arc of her life and music  in the documentary, which will air on KNME Channel 5 on Friday June 26 at 10 p.m.

  May 16, 2015  Austin city staff seek help in dealing with women; Russian official defends older men marrying teen girls; Human Rights Watch calls for end to virginity tests on female recruits to Indonesian military; African female musicians record  for "Poverty Is Sexist" campaign; More than 100 women raped in DRC; Women's Court convenes in Sarajevo; Harriet Tubman wins online poll to put a woman on $20 bill; Men's rights groups upset over "Mad Max" film's feminist message; Women's wages lag around the world; Pittsburgh pop-up store charges women less due to wage gap; Albuquerque City Cou

By United States Department of State (Official Photo at Department of State page) via Wikimedia Commons

  April 11, 2015 Hillary Clinton to announce presidential campaign run; Beijing to prosecute feminist protestors; Iran to allow women to attend sporting events; France to impose fines and jail for excessively thing models; WHO seeks to limit Caesarean sections; Rolling Stone retracts gang rape story; Pakistani woman starts rickshaw service for women; Equal Pay Day; NFL names first female coach; group names finalists for women on $20 bill;  women in New Mexico lag in employment and earnings.

Courtesy Beth Baker

04/11/15 Journalist Beth Baker explores how people are devising innovating ways to live as they approach retirement in her book “With A Little Help From Our Friends: Creating Community As We Grow Older." Megan Kamerick talks wtih Baker about how people are exploring options that ensure they are surrounded by a circle of friends, family, and neighbors.

And Megan also talks with some New Mexicans about similar projects that can help people avoid the detrimental effects of aging in isolation.

 

 

 

 

NMPBS

Tonight’s episode of Public Square on NMPBS at 7p looks at the benefits of linking schools with the communities they serve. Panelists include Highland High School Principal Marco Harris and Community Engagement Coordinator Janyce Cardenas from Wilson Middle School. In this segment of the discussion, hosted by Megan Kamerick, panelists describe how community schools provide needed support and services to students and their families. 

New Mexico Land Commissioner Puts The Brakes On SunZia – Associated Press

New Mexico Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn has put the brakes on a $2 billion transmission project that would carry electricity generated by renewable resources in New Mexico and Arizona to markets across the West.

Dunn announced late Wednesday that he was issuing a 60-day suspension after meeting with the developers. He says that will give his office time to review the project before any further development affects state trust lands.

Cristina Taccone

  Journalist Katy Butler’s father was vibrant and healthy when he had a crippling stroke in his late 70s. She chronicles her father's subsequent slide into dementia, near-blindness and misery in her book "Knocking on Heaven's Door: The Path to a Better Way of Death." She and her mother sought to give him a peaceful death against a battery of medical technologies, including a pacemaker. The book began as a story in the New York Times magazine and became one of the most downloaded articles in the publication's history.

Courtesy of Erika Wurth

  Megan Kamerick interviews Native American poet Erika Wurth  about her first novel "Crazy Horse's Girlfriend," which tackles poverty, drug abuse and identity with surprising humor and compassion through the eyes of teenager Margaritte, a smart girl who dreams of bigger things, and may or may not find them.

Jerome Walker and Dennis Myts via Wikimedia Commons and Creative Commons

  October 25, 2014: Genetic trait protects some Latinas from breast cancer; Boko Haram kidnaps more girls; Iranian women suffer acid attacks; divorce parties on the rise in Iran; ISIS attracts female recruits from the West; online harassment of women grows; Saudi Arabia warns against driving protests; Women of the Wall smuggle in Torah scroll for ceremony; Microsoft CEO apologizes for telling women to trust karma rather than ask for raise.

Ari Seth Cohen

  Filmmaker Lina Plioplyte describes the creation of the documentary "Advanced Style," which is based on the blog and book of the same name by street photographer Ari Seth Cohen. Together they explore the lives of seven fashionable seniors in New York  to dispel conventional ideas about beauty and aging. Their subjects show wit, creativity, grace and flair. It's currently at the Jean Cocteau Cinema in Santa Fe. Learn more and watch a trailer here.

  Albuquerque native Chris Marianetti, co-founder of Found Sound Nation, talks with Global Music host Megan Kamerick about OneBeat, a new model of cultural diplomacy that brings 25 musicians from 17 countries to the U.S. for one month. They work collaboratively to produce, compose and perform original music and develop strategies for social engagement through music.

Pixabay via Creative Commons

At the National Association for Women's national conference in Albuquerque in June 2014, a panel on incarceration examined the challenges women face reintegrating into society after spending time in prison. K.C. Quirk, executive director of Crossroads For Women, was joined by Eugenia Smith and Tracy Bland, both of whom got help at Crossroads and it's affiliated program Maya's Place. Also on the panel was Bette Fleishman, executive director of the New Mexico Women's Justice Project. 

    

Wikipedia via Creative Commons

July 12, 2014 Study finds 40 percent of colleges and universities have not conducted sexual assault investigations in the past five years; Syrian families increasingly headed by struggling women; some girls escape Boko Haram, but more than 200 still held hostage; Egyptian doctor stands trial for female genital mutilation following death of girl; Mexican high court orders government to pay damages for imprisoning indigenous woman; Congressional Democrats draft bill to override Supreme Court decision on contraception; Michelle J. Howard becomes first female four-star admiral in U.S.

Courtesy of the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market

This weekend the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market, IFAM, will feature an array of crafts from 150 master artists from 60 countries.

IFAM offers an opportunity for many craft people to support themselves and their communities, while also preserving cultural heritage and skills.

This year, Taiwan and Bangladesh are represented for the first time.

DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Robertson, U.S. Air Force. Via Creative Commons.

June 21, 2014  Women face violence and rape from Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS); women sterilized without consent in California prisons; Moroccan prime minister says women should stay at home; activists pressure Canadian government on missing aboriginal women; American Apparel fires CEO Dov Charney after years of sexual harassment complaints; girls called sluts for sexting, but prudes if they don't; new campaign focuses on economic security for women and families; Gary King targeted for wage discrimination in campaign ads; guard arrested for abusing women at Metropolitan Detention

Courtesy of Freida Lee Mock

It was a watershed event for American women, and American history.  In 1991, African-American law professor Anita Hill walked into a political firestorm when she testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the confirmation process for Clarence Thomas, the first African-American nominee to the Supreme Court.

Daniel Barsotti

Megan Kamerick talks with Andrea Feucht, author of "The Foodlover's Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque and Taos," about how she got into food writing and science coverage, her writing process and her tips for starting, and maintaining, a blog. Find her blog here.

Wikipedia via Creative Commons

May 31, 2014     Remembering Maya Angelou; Santa Barbara shooter left misogynist rants; perils of rural poverty revealed in rape and murder case in India; first menstrual hygiene awareness day; Forbes names 100 most powerful women; Sudan woman sentenced to lashes and death for adultery and apostasy; Texas woman files suit after giving birth in solitary confinement and baby died; Sweden elects feminist party to EU parliament; teen pregnancy declines, but remains high in New Mexico.

Courtesy of Freida Lee Mock

  In 1991, African-American law professor Anita Hill walked into a political firestorm when she testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the confirmation process for Clarence Thomas, the first African-American nominee to the Supreme Court.

In a calm, dignified voice, she detailed the alleged sexual harassment she suffered from Thomas when he headed the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. It was a turning point in American history and ignited a national debate about gender equity, sexual misconduct and power in the workplace.

Courtesy 516 ARTS

Artists Jessica Angel and Claudia X. Valdes join Suzanne Sbarge and Teresa Buscemi of 516 ARTS to discuss the new Digital Latin America exhibit, which looks at the ways in which artists negotiate the complex terrain between global and local, virtual and real, and political and private, in the creation of work that proposes alternative understandings of technology, art and cultural exchange.

Courtesy of Tony Gallegos

Fri. 4/4 8a: Our guests run two successful business incubators in New Mexico. Tony Gallegos is CEO of the South Valley Economic Development Center and Marie Longserre is president and CEO of the Santa Fe Business Incubator. These organizations have helped entrepreneurs create hundreds of jobs around the state, but they often fly under the radar while big corporate announcements grab the headlines.

Resources:

South Valley Economic Development Center

Santa Fe Business Incubator

Courtesy 516 ARTS

What does the condition of the city’s urban core say about the heart and soul of the city? Heart of the City, organized by 516 ARTS, is a collaborative project and exhibition that examine intersections of art, urban planning, cultural and economical development, education and community dialogue through a variety of lenses to focus on the urban center and identity of the city.

Courtesy 516 ARTS

Kate Bonansinga, author of "Curating at the Edge: Artists Respond to the U.S./Mexico Border," talks about the companion exhibit "Art at the Border: 21st Century Responses" at 516 ARTS. And artist Tania Candiana discusses her piece in the show as well.

Michael Grimes via Flickr and Creative Commons

September 21, 2013

Courtesy of Rahim AlHaj

Rahim AlHaj  fled Iraq in 1991 and eventually landed in Albuquerque, where he now lives. He will perform as part of the Peace Talks Radio 10th anniversary celebration on Sept. 13 in Santa Fe.

Courtesy of the Art of Revolution/One Million Bones project

In June of this year, the National Mall in Washington D.C. was the site of a huge art installation. One million bones, crafted by students, educators, artists and activists from around the world, were laid out across this iconic space in the nation's capital. The idea was to make a powerful visual call for action against ongoing genocide and mass atrocities in Sudan, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Burma, Somalia and Syria.

Courtesy of Stewart Lyons

The hit show “Breaking Bad” launched its final episodes recently on AMC. The series is set and filmed in Albuquerque and focuses on chemistry teacher Walter White. He turns to cooking methamphetamine to provide for his family after he is diagnosed with cancer.

On a hot summer afternoon in Albuquerque, N.M., the setting for the hit TV show Breaking Bad, a trolley that resembles a roving adobe house is packed with tourists.

The series follows Walter White, a chemistry teacher who turns to cooking methamphetamine to provide for his family after he gets cancer. The show, which begins its final season Sunday, has attracted critical acclaim, a slew of awards and rabid fans — some of whom have crammed onto the trolley for a tour of Breaking Bad filming sites.

David Weaver Do512.com / Creative Commons

July 13, 2013

Texas Legislature passes restrictive abortion bill while protestors have tampons and other feminine products confiscated; Ireland allows abortion in limited circumstances; Malala Yousafzai addresses United Nations; women's rights under assault in Afghanistan; Women of the Wall blocked by Orthodox protestors; U.N. calls for stop to assaults in Egyptian protests;  Church of England votes to ordain women bishops; Wimbledon stories overlook the fact that four British women have won the tournament since 1936; women sue city of Santa Fe over former police officer.

Omba Arts Trust and International Folk Art Market | Santa Fe

More than 190 artists will converge on the Santa Fe this year for the 10th anniversary of the International Folk Art Market July 12-14.  The money they earn will preserve important cultural traditions worldwide and it also offers a stepping stone to economic independence. Many artists find their way to the market through nonprofit groups that help them build their networks and open up new markets.

 

Namibia

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