KUNM

May Ortega

Public Health New Mexico Reporter

May is a Texas native who came to New Mexico to begin her professional career as a journalist in early 2017. She previously worked as a technology and healthcare reporter with Albuquerque Business First and has held various internships with newspapers around the country.May joined KUNM's Public Health New Mexico team in early 2018. While print news has been her livelihood since her college days, she sees radio as a more intimate way to provide a platform for underrepresented voices.

The opioid crisis in New Mexico has caused historically high numbers of overdose deaths and has overwhelmed law enforcement agencies.

 

But another side effect that we might not consider is the dangerous trash that builds up as a result of opioid use.

Phil Roeder via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

 

Since a school shooting in Parkland, Florida, left 17 people dead back in February, some of the students who survived have been rallying for other young people to get involved in politics.

migs2589 via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

 

People around New Mexico have been blasting their swamp coolers for weeks. And folks with low incomes can apply through a statewide program for help with an energy bill.

Julia via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

New data released by the New Mexico Department of Health show the state’s rate of high schoolers smoking cigarettes is at an all-time low. And they’re using other tobacco products less often, too.

Ageless North Shore via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

The Downtown Growers’ Market in Albuquerque is known as a place to find all things local, fresh, and homemade.

The people behind the market are looking to make it greener by phasing out plastic waste starting next month.

niki georgiev via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License


The Trump Administration is looking to make new rules that could shift federal funding for family planning services from health care providers to organizations that oppose abortion. If local healthcare clinics lose the family planning support they’re currently receiving, patients could be the ones paying the price.

knehcsg via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

New Mexico ranks 44th in the country for bicycle friendliness. A new study by the Santa Fe Police Department looked at 110 bicycle crashes that happened in the city in the last three years and the factors surrounding them.

Informedmag via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

Since the state introduced a texting option for its Peer-to-Peer Warmline earlier this year, more and more people are using it for emotional support.

SOURCE via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

New Mexico has some of the worst conditions for children in rural areas, according to a recent study. A local advocate for kids’ wellness said things are improving, and that voting can help with that momentum.

May Ortega | KUNM

Bob Moyer wasn’t thrilled about the slim pickings on the Republican side. Nine of the state’s 12 major races have a single Republican candidate running unopposed. His concerns about public safety drove him to the polls.

Rae Allen via Flickr.com / Creative Commons License

 

San Juan County is joining a lawsuit against opioid companies to get back the money it’s spent on combating the opioid crisis there.

Wastemanagementdude / Creative Commons Attribution License

Summertime gives kids the chance to go outside and have some fun, but many don’t always have a way to get around town. A local Albuquerque group is raising awareness about free bus passes for kids.

witfieldink via Pixabay / creative commons license

 

Nursing home inspections have found dozens of safety violations and mistreatment of elderly New Mexico residents over the years. Albuquerque Journal reporter Marie Baca examined some of the reports about these incidents. She sat down with Public Health New Mexico’s May Ortega to talk about what she found.

Carrie Jung

 

 

Abortion rights advocates in New Mexico are reacting to reports that the Trump Administration will end federal funding for family planning clinics that provide abortions or refer patients to other abortion providers.

Dr. Felisha Rojan-Minjares

 

When patients are faced with bias and racism, they can end up receiving poor treatment or get a wrong diagnosis. But over the years, more and more medical schools have introduced cultural competency training to try to address these issues. At the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, students have been learning how to treat diverse patients for more than a decade.

Juhan Sonin via Flickr / Creative Commons License

 

Earlier this week, President Donald Trump asked Congress to claw back $7 billion in federal funding for children’s health insurance coverage. But Washington, D.C.,’s decisions probably won’t have an immediate impact here.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons Attribution License

 

A high schooler from Carlsbad organized the Stand for the Second movement Wednesday for students who support the Second Amendment.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

When pregnant women experience discrimination and stress, their babies do, too. This could help explain disturbing racial inequities in maternal and infant health here.

Donovan Shortey, navajophotography.com via Flickr

 

Getting health care when you’re a veteran living on the Navajo reservation can be an all-day affair, starting with hours of driving to Albuquerque. Last week, the Navajo Nation Council unanimously approved more than $2 million to fund a veterans service center on tribal land.   

Pexels / CREATIVE COMMONS

The state’s Peer-to-Peer Warmline has introduced a texting option. This could help more locals early on so they won’t need to call a crisis hotline later.

Max Klingensmith via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The head of the state department that oversees behavioral health services is at odds with Governor Susana Martinez’s administration over how to handle gun violence in local schools.

Ed Williams

 


New Mexico’s rate of opioid overdose deaths used to be one of the worst in the country, but it’s slowly been improving. A new study says some of the state’s strategies could be helping.

Alexa Graham via Flickr / Creative Commons License

 


There could be more peace of mind for people in Albuquerque who don’t qualify for the state’s medical cannabis program if Mayor Tim Keller signs a measure city councilors passed on Monday. It would decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis.

 

Auntie P via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The Human Rights Campaign released the results of their health equity study and a couple of New Mexico's hospitals did really well.

516 Arts

 


Americans are deeply divided over how to handle immigration and an art exhibit in Albuquerque is working to bring new perspectives into the conversation.

Christian Haugen via Flickr / Creative Commons

 

Babies who are born underweight are at higher risk of developing health problems or even dying.

New state data show the rate of babies born with low birth weights to African American moms here hasn’t improved in almost two decades.

May Ortega / KUNM News

 

Some local schools encouraged their students to protest on Wednesday. But Rio Rancho High School was not one them.

Joaquin Gonzales, Director / Taos County EMS

 

Taos County recently rolled out the area’s first ambulance made specifically to transport obese patients. It can make it safer and more comfortable for heavier people to get medical assistance.

Ajnagraphy via compfight / Creative Commons License

Some local advocacy groups are teaming up to provide more resources for children who’ve been sex-trafficked. Right now, there’s not a lot out there to help them recover.

Sarah Gustavus

A proposal to decriminalize recreational cannabis in Albuquerque would do away with jail time and shrink fines. Co-sponsor Albuquerque City Councilor Pat Davis said the time is right and the measure has a lot of support. He also said it would also help police focus on more pressing things.

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