NPR News

Pages

Around the Nation
4:27 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Familiar Rubik's Cube Challenge Gets A New Edge

The new generation of Rubick's Cube players are stepping up their game, learning tips in online videos to solve the puzzle in seconds.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 8:16 am

When Lucas Etter's grandparents bought him a Rubik's Cube while he was visiting their retirement home, it was mainly to pass the time. Fast-forward two years, and that pastime is now an obsession.

Read more
National Security
4:10 am
Sun January 8, 2012

U.S., Iran Play Economic Knockdown

A member of the Iranian military takes position in a military exercise on the shore of the Sea of Oman in December.
Mohammad Ali Marizad AP

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 7:09 am

Tensions with Iran these days are as high as they've been in years, and managing them will be one of the top challenges facing the Obama administration this year. With Iran threatening to block U.S. ships from entering the Persian Gulf, and the United States vowing not to back down, the stage seems to be set for war. And yet, what's happening with Iran right now may be more of an economic confrontation than a military standoff.

Read more
Religion
4:10 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Has Obama Waged A War On Religion?

Some political and religious leaders say there is a White House-led war against religion.
Joe Drivas Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:35 pm

Americans' religious liberties are under attack — or at least that's what some conservatives say.

Newt Gingrich warns the U.S. is becoming a secular country, which would be a "nightmare." Rick Santorum says there's a clash between "man's laws and God's laws." And in a campaign ad, Rick Perry decried what he called "Obama's war on religion," saying there is "something wrong in this country when gays can serve openly in the military but our kids can't openly ... pray in school."

Read more
National Security
4:09 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Panetta: 'Human Side' Makes Pentagon Cuts Tough

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta speaks about the Defense Strategic Review, outlining defense budget priorities and cuts, during a press briefing at the Pentagon on Jan. 5.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 8:16 am

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is no stranger to budget battles.

He was head of the Office of Management and Budget and White House chief of staff under President Clinton. But now, the former congressman faces what could be some of the toughest budget decisions of his career — how to cut more than $480 billion from the Pentagon's bottom line.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:07 am
Sun January 8, 2012

A Year After Tucson Tragedies, Incivility Continues

Captain Mark Kelly hugs his wife, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords at the White House in October.
Pete Souza The White House via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:09 am

When a gunman opened fire on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and others at a shopping center near Tucson exactly a year ago — killing six people and injuring Giffords and many others — some people were quick to blame the episode on the overheated political climate.

Read more
It's All Politics
12:07 am
Sun January 8, 2012

Time Is Running Out To Knock Romney Down

Republican presidential candidates (from left) Ron Paul, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum participate in the ABC News, Yahoo! News and WMUR Republican Presidential Debate at Saint Anselm College on Saturday in Manchester, N.H.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Once more, the great media consensus was confounded. Saturday night's debate at St. Anselm's College in Manchester, N.H., produced another battle among half a dozen presidential contenders, much like a dozen before it. Front-runner Mitt Romney was neither knocked out nor even knocked down. He was scarcely even knocked around.

Once again, the evening ended with the bruises pretty equally distributed among the contestants. And with the New Hampshire primary bearing down on Tuesday, virtually no time remains for Romney's rivals to bring him down.

Read more
It's All Politics
10:29 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

New Hampshire Debate Left Us Really Ready For Some Football

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Texas Gov. Rick Perry (left to right) take their positions after a break in a debate in Manchester, N.H., Saturday.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 9:25 pm

Many of the journalists and professional political types who dutifully watched Saturday night's Republican presidential debate in New Hampshire probably had the same thought occur to them at several points: "For this we missed most of the NFL wildcard game between the New Orleans Saints and Detroit Lions?"

Read more
Author Interviews
2:59 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

'Man In The Middle': Between Faith And Politics

Timothy Goeglein (left) spent nearly eight years in the White House as President George W. Bush's key point of contact to American conservatives and the faith-based world and was often profiled in the national news media.
B&H Publishing Group

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 8:08 am

Tim Goeglein worked in the George W. Bush White House for eight years, and it was in the Oval Office that the president forgave him.

While working as an aide to Bush, Goeglein repeatedly plagiarized columns he sent to his hometown newspaper under his byline. When his actions were discovered, he went to Bush to apologize, fully expecting to be fired.

"Before I could get barely a few words out," he says, "he looked at me, and he said, 'Tim, grace and mercy are real. I have known grace and mercy in my life, and I'm extending it to you. You're forgiven.' "

Read more
Music Interviews
2:26 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

Kelly Clarkson: A Pop Star Survives

Kelly Clarkson's new album is Stronger.
Harper Smith Courtesy of the artist

Kelly Clarkson burst onto the pop scene in 2002 when she became the first winner of American Idol. She went on to win Grammys, break records on the charts and earn the affection of critics — one dubbed her "the best voice in the history of pop music."

Read more
Music Interviews
2:14 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

Frampton's Dream Guitar, Recovered Decades Later

Frampton poses with the guitar he thought he'd lost forever.
Courtesy Gregg Roth

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 7:03 am

Peter Frampton sold millions of records with the help of a customized Gibson guitar. Three decades ago, that guitar was destroyed in a plane crash ... or so he thought.

Read more
Around the Nation
1:43 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

New Hampshire: Land Of Diversity. Really.

While people tend not to know much about New Hampshire, when it comes to presidential politics, the small state tucked into northern New England has some clout.

For the better part of the past week, all eyes have been focused on the 42nd most populous state, which holds its primary Tuesday. But who are the voters there, who play such a critical role in selecting the nation's next leader?

It's pretty easy to identify the classic stereotypes most outsiders associate with New Hampshire. Just ask long-time resident Earl Wingate:

Read more
NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

Conservative Movement At Crossroads

Each of the Republican presidential candidate claims to be the true conservative — but who is? And what does that mean, anyway? Host Guy Raz looks at the state of conservatism particularly as it applies to the GOP candidates in a roundtable discussion with Dan McCarthy, editor of The American Conservative; Matthew Franck, director of the William E. and Carol G. Simon Center on Religion and the Constitution at the Witherspoon Institute in Princeton, N.J.; and Yaron Brook, president and executive director of the Ayn Rand Institute.

The Two-Way
11:51 am
Sat January 7, 2012

A Year After The Shooting, Tucson Looks Forward

Captain Mark Kelly hugs his wife, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) at the White House in October.
The White House Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:09 am

  • From 'Weekend Edition Saturday': An Emotional Year After The Tucson Shooting

The people of Tucson, Ariz., are commemorating the one-year anniversary of the shooting that claimed six lives and left 13 people wounded, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.). As NPR's Ted Robbins reports, community-wide events are scheduled all weekend:

Read more
It's All Politics
9:07 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Santorum Could Play Airtime Catch Up In Pair Of Weekend Debates

Rick Santorum (right) was put on one end of the candidates, Jon Huntsman (far left) on the other during a Nov. 12 televised debate in South Carolina. During the debate, Huntsman complained about being "a little lonely over here in Siberia," and Santorum responded: "Tell me about it."
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Rick Santorum has complained about being disregarded during a string of Republican presidential debates. The former Pennsylvania senator has a point (more on that in a moment), but likely won't for long: He should be at the center of attention during a pair of televised debates this weekend that lead into the New Hampshire primary.

Read more
Around the Nation
7:06 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Urban American Indians Rewrite Relocation's Legacy

Serenity Wyatt, 8, and her mother, April Duenas, attend the 28th annual powwow held by California State University, Northridge.
Gloria Hillard For NPR

On the edge of downtown Los Angeles, Rae Marie Martinez looks for familiar landmarks. The 60-something grandmother turns in a slow circle and shakes her head. In 1957, she still had long braids and wore long dresses.

People made fun of her back then. "I remember they used to kick my heels all the way to school," Martinez says.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:09 am
Sat January 7, 2012

California Dream Act Opponents Fail To Get Ballot Initiative

Originally published on Sun January 8, 2012 6:56 am

An effort to halt public benefits for undocumented students in California hit a snag Friday. As Bob Hensley of Capital Public Radio reports for NPR News, a petition to get the issue on the state ballot has failed:

Supporters of a proposed ballot initiative to rescind a law providing financial aid for California students who are illegally living in the state came up more than 55,000 signatures short.

So when the law goes into effect next year, it will allow undocumented students enrolled at public universities to apply for state loans and scholarships.

Read more
NPR Story
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Playwright Battles For Injured Vets On Stage

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now the story about one woman's effort to bring attention to the invisible wounds of war. The playwright Kate Wenner says she was stunned by investigations that showed thousands of U.S. troops were coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan with traumatic brain injuries and didn't receive the help they need. So Ms. Wenner decided to raise awareness through art. She's written a play about troops with traumatic brain injuries.

NPR's Daniel Zwerdling went to a production and has this report.

Read more
NPR Story
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

The View From The Unemployed

Originally published on Sat January 7, 2012 8:20 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The number of people applying for unemployment benefits has been dropping around the country as the new year begins. Companies are laying off fewer workers, and hiring may be picking up. The U.S. Labor Department reported yesterday that the unemployment rate is now 8.5 percent, the lowest level in almost three years.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

An Emotional Year After The Tucson Shooting

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

Tomorrow is the first anniversary of the shootings in Tucson, Arizona, which killed six people and wounded 13, including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. Memorial events are taking place all weekend.

NPR's Ted Robbins has been there and tells us how people are commemorating an event they cannot forget.

Read more
Sports
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Sports: No Contest This Wild Card Weekend

It's the opening day of the NFL wild card playoffs, but really, are any of those teams going to make a run at Green Bay or New England and their marquee quarterbacks? NPR Sports Correspondent Tom Goldman joins host Scott Simon to talk about Wild Card Weekend and more.

Election 2012
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Next GOP Stop: New Hampshire

Originally published on Sat January 7, 2012 8:20 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Voters in New Hampshire are getting a last close-up glimpse of the candidates running for the Republican presidential nomination. But the number of candidates is dwindling in this last weekend before Tuesday's primary vote. Now, in a moment, we'll hear how Congressman Ron Paul's New Hampshire bid is shaping up. First, we're joined by NPR's national political correspondent Don Gonyea in Manchester. Don, thanks very much for being with us.

Read more
Election 2012
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Ron Paul Touts Libertarianism In 'Live Free' State

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And Texas Congressman Ron Paul took a break from the campaign trail following his third-place finish in the Iowa caucuses, but today he is back in New Hampshire. He'll take part in tonight's debate with the other Republican candidates for president. Yesterday, Dr. Paul addressed an enthusiastic crowd of supporters in an airplane hangar in Nashua and took particular aim at one of his competitors, former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

Read more
Economy
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

More Than Finance Ahead For New Consumer Chief

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

President Obama may have riled Republicans with his recess appointment of Richard Cordray to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, but there's bipartisan agreement on Mr. Cordray's qualifications. He served as Ohio's attorney general. Before that, he was Ohio state treasurer. For more, we're joined by our friend from the business world, New York Times op-ed columnist Joe Nocera. Joe, thanks for being with us.

JOE NOCERA: Thanks for having me, Scott.

Read more
Animals
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies: Blame The Parasites?

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The honey bee population of North America is in decline. That fact has even acquired an acronym, CCD, Colony Collapse Disorder. A number of theories have been advanced as to why honey bees are dwindling, including viruses, mites and various fungi.

This week, researchers at San Francisco State University published a paper with a finding that bees on their own campus have been invaded by parasitic flies, who lay their eggs in the bees abdomen which causes the bees to become disoriented - falling down drunk disoriented.

Read more
Author Interviews
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

'Glory Be' A Tale Of The South For Young Adults

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 8:59 am

Eleven-year-old Gloriana Hamphill, known as Glory, feels like she's about to have the worst summer of her life. It's 1964 in Hanging Moss, Miss., a year that will teach her about bigotry, loyalty and bravery. Former librarian Augusta Scattergood talks with host Scott Simon about her first young adult fiction novel,Glory Be.

Read more
Author Interviews
6:00 am
Sat January 7, 2012

He Murdered His Friends, Now 'Iago' Moves On

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is Weekend Edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

Shakespeare's Iago is one of the great defining villains of literature. He masquerades as a friend, and that disguises his schemes to manipulate, betray and destroy. He fools Othello into believing that his wife is betraying him - she's not - then manipulates his old friend and commander into having her killed in a fit of engineered jealousy.

Read more
Opinion
4:55 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Iowa, New Hampshire: Small States With Big Roles

Iowa and New Hampshire are not demographic snapshots of America. They are smaller, less diverse and more rural than California, New York or Illinois, which have a lot more votes.

But Iowa and New Hampshire win a lot of attention early in an election year. As an old political columnist, now departed, once told me over the din of clinking cups in an Iowa diner, "If the first presidential caucuses were in Hawaii, congress would give federal subsidies to make gasoline out of pineapples."

Read more
The Salt
4:53 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Mystery Solved: Why The Cat Craves Mushrooms (And People Do, Too)

Why do cats have an affinity for mushrooms?
Marco Varrone iStockphoto.com

Anyone who lives with a cat knows that fruits and vegetables do not top the feline food chart. So it's a surprise to hear that some cats do crave mushrooms.

This tale starts with Ellen Jacobson, an amateur mushroom hunter in Colorado. As she was cooking up a bolete mushroom, her cat Cashew started brushing against her legs. She put some of the mushrooms in a bowl, and Cashew gobbled them up. "He didn't like them raw," she told The Salt. "He only liked them cooked."

Read more
Economy
4:09 am
Sat January 7, 2012

What Jobs Numbers Mean For Obama's Employment

President Obama speaks about jobs in Manchester, N.H., in November. The Labor Department reported Friday that unemployment dropped to 8.5 percent.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sat January 7, 2012 11:38 am

President Obama acknowledged Friday that the economic recovery has a long way to go. Still, he was able to share some good news. The Labor Department reported that U.S. employers added 200,000 jobs in December, and the unemployment rate fell to 8.5 percent.

"Obviously, we have a lot more work to do," he said, "but it is important for the American people to recognize that we've now added 3.2 million new private-sector jobs over the last 22 months."

Those better-than-expected numbers could help Obama as he tries to hang onto his own job.

Read more
Election 2012
4:02 am
Sat January 7, 2012

Romney's Week: A Squeaker, A Love Fest And A Shrug

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney pleaded with his supporters at a rally Monday in Dubuque, Iowa, saying, "I need every vote." He did — winning the Iowa caucuses the next day by just eight votes.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 7, 2012 8:55 pm

When Mitt Romney kicked off this past week with a blitzkrieg tour of Iowa, he had no way of knowing just how true this statement would be: "You guys in Dubuque, you're the best. Get out there and vote tomorrow. I need every vote!"

He wasn't kidding. When the final numbers were tallied in Iowa, the former Massachusetts governor edged his closest rival, Rick Santorum, by the smallest margin in Iowa history — just eight votes.

Read more

Pages