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Presidential Race
3:00 am
Fri January 13, 2012

In Search Of An 'Anti-Romney': Guide To The Players

Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, is among the evangelicals who will meet to talk about GOP alternatives to Mitt Romney.
Lee Celano Reuters /Landov

More than 150 leaders in the conservative evangelical Christian community are getting together Friday and Saturday at a private ranch west of Houston in a last-ditch effort to derail Mitt Romney's march to the Republican nomination.

The meeting, which will feature state and regional leaders as well as prominent pastors and national-profile evangelical stars, is not intended as a Romney-bashing event, says Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council and a big voice among conservative evangelicals.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri January 13, 2012

The Last Word In Business

On Twitter, News Corps. Chief Rupert Murdoch confessed: "We screwed up in every way possible." He added the company learned a lot of valuable and expensive lessons from the purchase of the social networking site.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri January 13, 2012

Gingrich Backs Off On Private Equity Jabs

As Newt Gingrich campaigned in South Carolina yesterday, there were signs he was beginning to soften his critique of the private equity career of rival Mitt Romney. Gingrich had come under fire this week from fellow Republicans for his attack on Romney.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri January 13, 2012

NFL Playoff Preview

David Greene talks with NPR's Mike Pesca about this weekend's NFL match-ups. Tim Tebow will lead the Denver Broncos against the New England Patriots in the marquee game Saturday night.

Latin America
2:00 am
Fri January 13, 2012

Trip To Latin America Shows Iran's Not Isolated

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has completed a four-country tour of left-leaning Latin American nations. His travels come as the West increases pressure on Iran over its nuclear program.

NPR's Juan Forero is in Bogota, Colombia. He's been monitoring Ahmadinejad's travels in this hemisphere. Hi, Juan.

JUAN FORERO, BYLINE: Hi. Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: So where exactly did Ahmadinejad go?

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All Tech Considered
10:38 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

CES: Tech Launching Pad, Home To 8M Types Of iPod Cases

H2O has figured out a way to waterproof gadgets. The company was a media sensation at this year's CES.
H20

More than 3,100 companies flocked to the Consumer Electronics Show this year to hawk their wares. The show's host, the consumer Electronic Association, estimates roughly 20,000 products were launched at the show this year. And chances are good that many – maybe even most — will fail.

The show will close its doors Friday and there are lots of little companies and entrepreneurs packing up that may not make it back next year. Still, their hustle is infectious. And with luck, a few startups launched here this year could go on to become huge.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:28 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Will The Show Go On At New York City Opera?

The embattled general manager and artistic director of New York City Opera, George Steel.
Jason Kempin Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

For almost 70 years, New York City has been home to two opera companies: the well-heeled Metropolitan Opera and its scrappy younger sibling, the New York City Opera. But City Opera has fallen on hard times, and a bitter labor dispute might mean curtains for this beloved institution.

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It's All Politics
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

GOP Primary Campaign Inundates South Carolina TV Viewers

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

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Planet Money
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

The Transformation Of American Factory Jobs, In One Company

Maddie Parlier at work.
Dean Kaufman The Atlantic

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 12:46 pm

This is the second in a two-part series. Part one is here. For more, see Adam Davidson's cover story in this month's issue of The Atlantic.

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Afghanistan
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

In Afghanistan, Some Former Taliban Become Police

The northern Afghan town of Char Bolak is guarded by the Critical Infrastructure Police, an auxiliary police program. The U.S. is increasingly relying on ad hoc local militias to fight the Taliban, but residents and government officials have concerns about the militias.
Quil Lawrence NPR

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

NATO officials say they have reversed a disturbing trend in northern Afghanistan.

In 2009 and 2010, Taliban insurgents made inroads across the north of the country, which had been secure for years. NATO says that last year it brought the north back under control, but Afghan officials say it's thanks to one of the most controversial American tactics here: the use of ad hoc local militias.

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StoryCorps
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Threats And Lies, And 'Who I'm Supposed To Be'

Nathan Hoskins told Sally Evans the story of how his mother tried to scare him out of being gay, during a visit to StoryCorps in Lexington, Ky.
StoryCorps

Nathan Hoskins knew from an early age that he was gay. But when he was growing up in rural Kentucky, his mother took extreme steps to convince him otherwise.

"When I was in sixth grade, I had met a good friend and he wasn't interested in girls," Hoskins, who's now 33, tells his friend Sally Evans. "One day, he said, 'I have a Valentine's Day card for you.'"

"I asked him for it, and he said it was so special that he mailed it," he says. "And he didn't know he'd done a very terrible thing because at my house only one person got the mail — and that was my mother."

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Economy
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

In GOP Campaign, Private Equity Firms Draw Flak

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 10:20 am

Was Mitt Romney a job-creating turnaround artist? Or was he, as some on the campaign trail have said, a "vulture capitalist"? That question has become a top issue in the Republican presidential primaries.

In the 1980s, Romney ran a private equity firm called Bain Capital. It's an industry where it's hard to avoid getting your hands dirty.

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Economy
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Layoffs Hit Wall Street As Financial Needs Change

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in December. In the past year, banks in New York and around the country have announced tens of thousands of job cuts, as there isn't the same need for some financial services as before.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

It's hard to tell if the Occupy Wall Street protests had much impact on banks, but banks are doing some de-Occupying within their own ranks. It wasn't as bad as the massive layoffs following the 2008 meltdown, but last year was painful for Wall Street. Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman, Morgan Stanley — almost all the big banks — announced big layoffs, totaling more than 60,000 employees.

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Election 2012
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Evangelical Leaders Struggle To Crown A Candidate

Richard Land, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, testifies before Congress on July 14, 2010. He thinks religious conservatives should try to rally behind a candidate other than Mitt Romney.
Alex Brandon AP

Rick Santorum was fresh off his surprise showing in the Iowa caucuses and fielding questions on a radio program, when a caller challenged the Republican presidential candidate on his overt religiosity.

"He said, 'We don't need a Jesus candidate. We need an economic candidate,' " Santorum recalled later, at a town hall meeting in New Hampshire. "And my answer to that was, 'We always need a Jesus candidate, right?' "

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World
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

In Russia's Far East, A Frayed Link To Moscow

Compared to many of the dynamic economies in Asia, development is Russia's Far East is limited. Here, men wait for a ferry to take them to Russky Island just off Vladivostok, on Russia's Pacific Coast. In the background, a bridge to the island is being built.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

After a train journey of nearly 6,000 miles from Moscow, the Russian Pacific port of Vladivostok can feel like a different country. The people and the language are still Russian, but the strong Asian influence is undeniable. And many residents say the bond to the rest of Russia has been growing weaker, while the ties to Asia have been growing stronger since the Soviet breakup two decades ago. NPR's David Greene has this report as he wraps up his journey on the Trans-Siberian railway.

The last of three stories

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Business
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Kodak Retirees Worry Amid Bankruptcy Talk

Amid recent reports that Kodak could be headed into bankruptcy, financial advisers in Rochester, N.Y., where the company is based, are seeing more and more Kodak retirees who are anxious about their personal financial futures.

Once upon a time, Kodak provided secure, good-paying jobs to tens of thousands of local residents. For about the past 25 years, the company has been shedding local employees — from a high of more than 60,000 in 1982 to about 6,000 today.

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The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

VIDEO: Could It Be? A Snowboarding Bird?

A bird slides down a snowy roof.
YouTube

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Energy
3:53 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Pro-Pipeline Canada To Americans: Butt Out, Eh?

OurDecision.ca campaign, which calls on Canadians to write to Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver asking him to ban foreigners and "their local puppet groups" from appearing before ongoing public hearings for a new pipeline project. " href="/post/pro-pipeline-canada-americans-butt-out-eh" class="noexit lightbox">
A screen shot from Ethical Oil's OurDecision.ca campaign, which calls on Canadians to write to Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver asking him to ban foreigners and "their local puppet groups" from appearing before ongoing public hearings for a new pipeline project.
OurDecision.ca

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:28 pm

Yet another foreign government has accused Americans of meddling in its internal affairs. It says U.S. donors are bankrolling local political activists, and it may be time for a crackdown on the political influence of outsiders.

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Around the Nation
3:48 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Heavy Lobbying Before Keystone Oil Pipeline Decision

The Syncrude tar sands mine north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, is seen in November. Alberta's tar sands would supply the oil for the prospective Keystone XL pipeline.
Todd Korol Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:12 pm

The oil industry and environmentalists are fighting over the Keystone XL pipeline, and in this election year, President Obama is caught in the middle.

The industry says the pipeline, which would carry oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast, would create jobs. Environmentalists worry it will lead to more pollution. Obama has until next month to make a decision, and that has both sides lobbying heavily.

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The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

With New Platform, Putin Presents Himself As A Reformer

Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin speaks during a Government Presidium meeting in Moscow on Jan. 12.
Yana Lapikova AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 3:42 pm

Russia's Vladimir Putin took to the Internet to present the platform he would persue should he be elected president on March 4.

It was a bold platform, considering that it would walk back policies he helped institute. As The Telegraph puts it, it was Putin remaking himself into a "liberal reformer."

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Afghanistan
3:26 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Viral Images, The Military's Recurring Nightmare

A still frame taken from a YouTube video purportedly shows Marines who desecrated three dead men thought to be members of the Taliban in Afghanistan.
YouTube

The U.S. military says it's investigating a video that appears to show Marines desecrating the corpses of Taliban fighters killed in Afghanistan. Regardless of those findings, the outrage in the Islamic world is likely to be severe, as with other disturbing images that have surfaced during U.S. wars in Muslim countries over the past decade.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:19 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

UConn Claims Resveratrol Researcher Falsified Work

The already shaky case for the anti-aging powers of resveratrol, a substance in red wine, is looking a little shakier.

After a three-year investigation, the University of Connecticut Health Center has told 11 scientific journals that studies they published by resveratrol researcher Dipak K. Das may not be trustworthy.

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The Salt
3:08 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Could A Soda Tax Prevent 2,600 Deaths Per Year?

Researchers say that if the price of soda gets higher, people will drink less of it, which will lead to fewer deaths.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 12:33 pm

A new study in the journal Health Affairs estimates that a penny-per-ounce tax on soft drinks and other sugary beverages could prevent about 240,000 cases of diabetes per year, and 8,000 strokes and 26,000 premature deaths over a decade (or 2,600 per year).

Yes, death by soda.

So the analysis got me thinking: Our behavior is hard to predict, right? I know mine is.

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The Two-Way
2:39 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

How Do Land Birds End Up In A Tiger Shark's Belly?

Scientists are facing a riddle. For two years, researchers at Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama have been studying the diets of Tiger Sharks in the Gulf of Mexico and they found that the sharks not only eat sea creatures, but also make a habit of eating land birds. Yep that's right woodpeckers, catbirds, kingbirds and swallows have all been found in their bellies.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:11 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Biggest Bucks In Health Care Are Spent On A Very Few

A relatively small number of patients account for some of the biggest spending on health care.
Ricardo Reitmeyer iStockphoto.com

So you know how on Monday the federal government reported that the $2.6 trillion the nation spent on health care in 2010 translated into just over $8,400 per person?

Well, a different study just released by a separate federal agency shows that second number doesn't actually mean very much.

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It's All Politics
1:31 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Bill Janklow's Death Gives South Dakota Tribal Leader Chance To Vent

When someone dies, the eulogies roll in, the higher the stature of the departed, the more stately the praise.

And that's certainly somewhat true for Bill Janklow, South Dakota's former congressman and governor who died Thursday from his brain cancer.

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The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Judge Declares Natalee Holloway Legally Dead

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 1:34 pm

An Alabama judge signed an order that declares Natalee Holloway, the teenager who went missing in Aruba while on a high school graduation trip, legally dead. Holloway was last seen in 2005.

The AP reports:

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Latin America
1:19 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Ordinary Life Resurrected, Slowly, In Haiti

A storefront in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, is brightly painted with a message welcoming President Michel Martelly into power. Two years after a devastating earthquake destroyed much of the Haitian capital, progress is palpable.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:28 pm

In Port-au-Prince, a radio blares from speakers in front of a guy selling pirated CDs on Delmas, a main street in the Haitian capital. Women sitting along the side of the road hawk everything from vegetables to cigarettes to pharmaceuticals. Overloaded tap-taps, the pickup trucks that serve as the main form of public transportation here, chug up the hill.

The scene is one that's remarkable for being unremarkable: Though it occurred this week, it could just as easily have been Port-au-Prince two years ago, before a massive earthquake destroyed much of the capital.

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The Two-Way
1:13 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Foxconn Resolves Dispute With Workers Who Threatened Suicide

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 2:43 pm

Earlier this month, a group Chinese workers at Foxconn spent two days on the roof of one of the companies factories in central China. As The Telegraph reported, the workers were threatening to commit suicide to protest their working conditions.

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The Salt
1:08 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Why X-Rayed Food Isn't Radioactive, And Other Puzzles

Irradiation is most often used to kill insects, parasites, or bacteria in or on spices, which are typically dried outdoors in before being shipped.
Lui Kit Wong MCT /Landov

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 2:23 pm

Earlier this week, we were surprised to learn that food manufacturers increasingly X-ray foods to screen for foreign objects that can break a tooth. That sounds like a good idea.

But the notion of X-rayed food also sparked a lively debate in The Salt's comments section on whether this poses a health threat. After all, we do know that some X-rays can damage DNA in the human body. So what does radiation mean for food?

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