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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Suspects Arrested In Okla. Shootings

Two men have been arrested in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Tulsa, Okla., last Friday. Amanda Bland, a reporter for the Tulsa World, discusses the arrests.

The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Suspects Arrested In Tulsa, Okla., Shootings

Alvin Watts, 32, left, and Jacob England, 19, were arrested following a tip from the public to help police solve the five shootings that happened Friday. A police spokesman said the two face three counts of first degree murder and two counts of shooting with intent to kill.
AFP/Getty Images

Two men were arrested in Tulsa, Okla., on Sunday in connection with the deaths of three people in a shooting spree that terrorized the city's black community and left two others critically wounded.

Jacob England, 19, and Alvin Watts, 32, were arrested following a tip from the public to help police solve the five shootings that happened Friday. Police spokesman Jason Willingham said the two face three counts of first-degree murder and two counts of shooting with intent to kill.

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The Two-Way
11:35 am
Sun April 8, 2012

In Malawi, A Woman In Power, An Economy In Need

Joyce Banda has become Malawi's first woman president after the death of President Bingu wa Mutharika.
Amos Gumulira AFP/Getty Images

Malawi's first female president takes office with a personal history of women's rights advocacy and a long fight ahead. For Joyce Banda, economic empowerment is crucial for women's progress. It is also a nationwide struggle now resting on her shoulders.

Banda, who had been the country's vice president, was sworn in Saturday, following the death of President Bingu wa Mutharika on Thursday.

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Remembrances
9:56 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Veteran Newsman Mike Wallace Of '60 Minutes' Dead

60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace died on Saturday night, according to a CBS spokesman.
Peter Freed AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:53 am

The urbane Mike Wallace, a CBS News correspondent equally at home questioning con men, celebrities and chiefs of state, died Saturday in New Canaan, Conn. He was 93.

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The Two-Way
8:39 am
Sun April 8, 2012

'60 Minutes' Newsman Mike Wallace Has Died

Journalist Mike Wallace
Evan Agostini AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:53 am

Veteran newsman and 60 Minutes founding correspondent Mike Wallace has died at age 93.

Wallace died Saturday night, according to a CBS spokesperson. On the CBS website, colleague Morley Safer is remembering the journalist's career, from Wallace's first appearance on the network to his last. He writes in part:

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Presidential Race
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Romney Rolls On As Santorum Sticks It Out

There's a question whether Rick Santorum will prolong his presidential campaign to finish in Pennsylvania later this month. Mitt Romney, on the other hand, is moving in for the kill, buying $1.8 million of airtime in the state. NPR's Mara Liasson reports on the state of the GOP nominating campaign.

Presidential Race
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Warming Up For The GOP Veepstakes

One choice that's not necessarily around the corner, but is certainly taking up a lot of time in Republican presidential front-runner Mitt Romney's camp is the shortlist for potential running mates. That is, of course, IF he wins the nomination. Host Rachel Martin talks with Republican strategist Mark McKinnon about the possible strategies Romney may use.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Two Arrests In Tulsa, Okla., Shootings

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Police in Tulsa, Oklahoma this morning arrested two white males in shootings that left three people dead and two more critically wounded - all of them black. The shootings happened Friday in the same north Tulsa neighborhood all around the same time. It comes against a background of heightened tensions in the wake of the Trayvon Martin shooting death in Florida. Earlier this morning, we spoke with the mayor of Tulsa, Oklahoma, Dewey Bartlett. He gave us an update on the case.

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Presidential Race
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

The Foreign Policy Advantage For Obama 2012

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

The Story Goes On For Trayvon Martin's Hometown

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 10:07 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

From Tulsa, we move our focus back to the city of Sanford, Florida, where Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African-American teen, was shot and killed six weeks ago by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. The constant spotlight has brought the issue of race to the forefront, and with it some tense moments in that Florida community. NPR's Kathy Lohr spent the last week in Sanford and has this story.

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Sports
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Cambridge, Oxford And A Race For Water Supremacy

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 10:07 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The annual Oxford-Cambridge University boat race took place in London yesterday. And reporter Vicki Barker was one of those throwing a party along the race route. For boat race party-throwers and the oarsmen themselves, the day unfolds with military precision - or at least it's supposed to. Vicki Barker has more.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: The man duck saw that something needed to be done...

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Statewide Races
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Wisc. Stays In Play Even After Primaries

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 10:07 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When a presidential campaign leaves a state, political activists and the local reporters who cover the candidates often take a vacation. Not so in Wisconsin this year, where Mitt Romney won the GOP primary this past Tuesday. As Chuck Quirmbach of Wisconsin Public Radio reports, recall elections scheduled during the next two months mean there is no spring break in Badger State politics.

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Religion
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

The Army Chaplain: A Kind Of Mission Specialist

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There is one group in the military with a unique role in helping soldiers and their families through difficult times. So, on this Easter Sunday, an Army chaplain describes his work helping soldiers who have just returned from war.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RICK EBB: My name is Chaplain Rick Ebb. I'm the post chaplain here at Camp Atterbury. I am one of the first people they see, and I think that's very important that the representative of faith is there. And we say a prayer, a quick prayer, for God's safety bringing them back.

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Sports
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Negro League Stats, As They've Never Been Seen Before

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 10:07 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Technology
6:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

A Brief History Of The Mobile Phone

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A new Smartphone goes on sale. The Nokia Lumina 900 represents the Finnish company's big and somewhat desperate effort to regain a toehold in the all-important U.S. market.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman offers this brief history of America's infatuation with the mobile phone.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: In The iconic 1987 film "Wall Street," Michael Douglas strolls the beach with and uses his cell phone to congratulate an associate on making a ton of money.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "WALL STREET")

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The Two-Way
5:37 am
Sun April 8, 2012

VIDEO: 'It Gets Better' For Mormon Students Too

A screengrab from the "It Gets Better" video created by gay and lesbian students at Brigham Young University.
YouTube

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The Salt
4:04 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Eggs Become Art To Celebrate Life's Rebirth

Ukrainians have been crafting elaborately decorated eggs for thousands of years.
Konstantin Chernichkin Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:54 am

It all starts with the egg.

In spring, chickens start laying again, bringing a welcome source of protein at winter's end. So it's no surprise that cultures around the world celebrate spring by honoring the egg.

Some traditions are simple, like the red eggs that get baked into Greek Easter breads. Others elevate the egg into an elaborate art, like the heavily jewel-encrusted Faberge eggs that were favored by the Russian czars starting in the 19th century.

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Asia
4:02 am
Sun April 8, 2012

India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

A woman talks on her cellphone in a slum area of Bhopal last month.
Sanjeev Gupta EPA /Landov

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 3:56 pm

India's once-a-decade census has turned up some striking numbers: The population grew this past decade by 181 million — that's the total population of Brazil. India now has more than 1.2 billion people and is on track to overtake China as the world's most populous nation in 2030.

India's rapid economic growth — and its long-standing poverty — are also reflected in the census. More than half of all Indian households now have cellphones, but fewer than half have toilets.

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Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
4:01 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Dismissed: Military Families Reunite, Face The Future

A portrait of Spc. Jonathan Nestico, 27, is displayed in his family's home in Woburn, Mass.
Becky Lettenberger Becky Lettenberger/NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:53 am

Back from a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan, the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard had to make a pit stop before heading home. At Camp Atterbury in Indiana, the service members were far from their families, most of which are in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

The returning soldiers had to go through a series of checkups and assessments before their welcome-home ceremony, which marks the moment they return to civilian life and the people they left behind.

Before they got there, there was anxiety on both sides — for soldiers and their families.

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Around the Nation
3:22 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

Is Death Row Still Death Row If Repeal Passes?

Religious leaders stop to pray as they march to the state Capitol for a rally to support repealing the death penalty, in Hartford, Conn., on Tuesday. The state Senate passed a bill abolishing capital punishment Thursday.
Jessica Hill AP

Following a vote this week in the state Senate, it's all but certain that Connecticut will become the next state to abolish the death penalty. But residents are divided over what a repeal will mean for those currently on death row.

State Sen. Edward Meyer stressed that the bill — which makes life in prison without parole the maximum sentence — was not retroactive.

"It doesn't affect the 11 inmates that are on death row right now," he said.

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Environment
2:12 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

Sunny Days Are Here Again — But Is That Good?

A couple enjoy a sunny afternoon against the backdrop of the Midtown skyline from Piedmont Park in Atlanta in late March.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat April 7, 2012 5:41 pm

Across the country, more than 7,700 daily temperature records were broken last month, on the heels of the fourth warmest winter on record.

While it might be time to lie on a blanket in the park, climate scientists are worried. They say all these sunny days are actually an extreme weather event, one with local and global implications.

In Iowa, March was so hot — a record-breaking 84 degrees — that some crops there, like oats, are now running way ahead of schedule.

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Music Interviews
2:00 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

Rosie Thomas: Restarting A Musical Life 'With Love'

Rosie Thomas' latest album is titled With Love.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 3:32 pm

With Love is singer Rosie Thomas' first full-length album in four years, and she's experienced many ups and downs in that time. One of the downs was an injury: Her thyroid broke, causing her to take a hiatus from music.

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Analysis
1:00 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

Week In News: Obama, Romney Eye General Election

Originally published on Sat April 7, 2012 4:25 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Businesses created another 121,000 jobs last month in the unemployment rate ticked down. Our economy has now created more than four million private sector jobs over the past two years.

MITT ROMNEY: A record number of Americans are now living in poverty. And the most vulnerable are the ones that have been hurt the most. Thirty percent of single moms are now living in poverty.

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

A New Turn In Calif. 'Shaken Baby' Case

Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan speaks with NPR reporter Joseph Shapiro about the sentence of Shirley Ree Smith's "shaken baby" case. California Gov. Jerry Brown has commuted Smith's sentence. Despite her claims of innocence, Smith was convicted in December 1997, and has been free since 2006 awaiting the results of her appeals.

World
1:00 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

For India, An Unclear Visit From Pakistan's President

Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari is scheduled to make a one-day visit to India on Sunday, April 8. It's the first visit by a Pakistani president since 2005. However Zardari's trip is being described as a personal visit in an attempt to keep expectations low and to allow both sides room to avoid confronting difficult issues, such as Indian demands that Pakistan do more to fight terrorism. Elliot Hannon reports from New Delhi.

The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

Ploompf!! Pillow Fights Erupt Across The Globe

A pillow fight in London's Trafalgar Square in London, April 7, 2012.
Olivia Harris Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:53 am

If it's not already marked on your calendar, here's your warning: Today is International Pillow Fight Day. Cities around the world are taking the holiday seriously — as serious as a pillow fight can be, anyway.

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The Two-Way
11:40 am
Sat April 7, 2012

Chinese Teen Sells Kidney For iPad And iPhone

A report that a 17-year-old sold a kidney to buy an iPhone and an iPad has citizens worried about consumerism among China's youth.
Vincent Thian AP

An iPhone and iPad were worth more to a Chinese teenager than his kidney, according to a report Friday from China's Xinhua news agency. Now five people in southern China face charges of illegal organ trading.

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Simon Says
6:43 am
Sat April 7, 2012

Bosnia Remembers When The World Looked Away

Red chairs fill a main street in Sarajevo on Friday as the city marks the 20th anniversary of the start of the Bosnian war. Officials lined up 11,541 chairs in 825 rows to represent the 11,541 Sarajevans who were killed during the siege.
Amel Emric AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:53 am

I think that one of the great works of humankind runs below an airport runway in Sarajevo.

Sixty-six feet of a 3,000-foot-long tunnel built during the Siege of Sarajevo have been restored. Twenty years ago this weekend, the city was surrounded by Serb armies, who rained down mortar, rockets and sniper fire.

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NPR Story
6:00 am
Sat April 7, 2012

Unemployment Fell, But More Ended Job Hunt

Just when it seemed to be gaining steam, the U.S. job market pretty much stalled in March. Employers added a net 120,000 jobs during the month, defying the higher expectations of a lot of economists. And though the unemployment rate fell, it did so for the wrong reasons.

Over the past few months, the economy has been adding jobs at a good, if not spectacular, pace, and all the signs suggested that trend had continued through March. As it happened, jobs increased at a rate that barely keeps up with population growth.

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NPR Story
6:00 am
Sat April 7, 2012

Obama Makes A Pitch To Working Women

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A weaker than expected jobs report is a setback for President Obama as the election nears. The president says that while private employers have added some four million jobs over the last two years, economic security remains elusive. The president spoke yesterday at a White House conference on women in the economy, and as NPR's Scott Horsley reports, voters who are women may be the key to the president's political future.

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