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It's All Politics
5:40 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Study: Statehouse Press Corps In Decline

New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver talks to reporters in a hallway at the capitol in Albany in March. The ranks of statehouse reporters have been thinning in recent years.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 6:26 pm

A declining number of reporters are stalking the hallways of the nation's statehouses.

That's according to a Pew Research report released Thursday. The study found that the number of full-time statehouse newspaper reporters declined by more than a third between 2003 and 2014. There are now just 164 full-time newspaper journalists reporting on the bills, protests and politicians in the nation's 50 state capitals.

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The Salt
5:03 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

Intrepid pizza purveyors in action: Frontier Airlines flight attendants pass out pies to the delighted passengers.
Logan Marie Torres AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:51 pm

It's one of those stories that start in the middle. Midflight from Washington, D.C., to Denver on Monday, pilot Gerhard Brandner hit some bad weather that forced him to land in Wyoming. It was a mundane delay like most others. His Frontier Airlines plane was grounded on a tarmac in Cheyenne.

That's when the pilot made a decision that made him a national hero.

"I figure out, well, I'm getting hungry; I'll bet you the folks be hungry back there, too," Brandner says. "So I called Domino's."

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Monkey See
5:03 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

Mindy Kaling and Carson Daly announce nominations for The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards Thursday morning.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 8:59 pm

There are things you could quibble about in the array of nominations announced today for the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards.

No best drama series nomination for CBS' The Good Wife, though several stars got acting nods. No acting nomination for Orphan Black star Tatiana Maslany, though she plays about eight different roles on BBC America's clone-focused adventure drama. No best variety show nod for John Oliver's increasingly stellar Last Week Tonight on HBO. And a best TV miniseries nod for A&E's dreadful Bonnie and Clyde?

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The Salt
4:28 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

This Fine Wine Made At An Italian Penal Colony Is No 2-Buck Chuck

Marquise Lamberto Frescobaldi (right), of the winemaking dynasty, talks with prisoners Brian Baldissin (left) and Francesco Papa at his vineyard on Gorgona island in June 2013.
Alessandro Bianchi Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:58 pm

Eighteen miles off Tuscany's coast, Gorgona is Italy's last island prison. Its steep cliffs rise up from azure Mediterranean waters. Here, a select group of convicts serves the end of long sentences by farming. And now, a legendary winemaker is training them to make high-end wine.

Mentioned by Dante in The Divine Comedy, Gorgona was for thousands of years a refuge for hermits and monks. Since 1869, it's been a penal colony.

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Shots - Health News
4:25 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

A Growing Number Of Veterans Struggles To Quit Powerful Painkillers

Bryan McDonel and his father, Mike, both served multiple tours in Iraq with the National Guard. Bryan was first prescribed painkillers before his deployment, and his dependence on medication prompted a downward spiral.
Quil Lawrence NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:19 pm

There are antlers everywhere on the walls of Bryan and Mike McDonel's place near Pine Bluff, Ark. The house is hardly big enough for all their hunting trophies. Both are good shots with their hunting bows; Bryan and Mike, his father, served in the Arkansas National Guard and deployed together to Iraq, twice.

The McDonel family has served in the military for generations. But Bryan, 35, is out of the service now. He is one of thousands of troops and veterans who struggle with addiction to prescription drugs.

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Politics
4:16 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Obama's Request For Immigration Funds Meets Pushback On The Hill

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

President Obama has asked Congress for $3.7 billion in emergency funds to address the influx of immigrant children at the U.S.-Mexico border. The Senate Appropriations Committee is holding a hearing Thursday about the request.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Clerical Error Puts Church On New York's 'George Carlin Way'

The Corpus Christi Church in Manhattan, where iconoclastic comedian George Carlin once attended school and later ridiculed in some of his monologues, has a new street address: George Carlin Way.

The New York Times calls what's being described as a clerical error "an irony of Carlinesque proportions." The church fought a street named after the comedian since the idea was proposed three years ago.

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Code Switch
3:23 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

In Stories Of Muslim Identity, Playwright Explores Fault Lines Of Faith

Between Eli and Zarina (Greg Keller and Nadine Malouf), a family's Muslim faith undergoes rupture and renewal.
Erin Baiano Courtesy of Lincoln Center Theater

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 6:54 pm

Ayad Akhtar is a novelist, actor and screenwriter. And when his first play, Disgraced, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2013, he also became one of the most talked about new voices in American theater.

Long before this buzz, though, Akhtar grew up in a Muslim family with roots in Pakistan. He mines this background to bring the inner lives and conflicts of Muslim Americans to the stage. His plays often feature cutting dialogue and confrontations steeped in the tension between Islamic tradition and personal evolution.

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The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Signs Emerge Of A Compromise On Obama's $3.7B Immmigration Request

Immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally are stopped in Granjeno, Texas, on June 25. President Obama asked Congress this week for $3.7 billion to cope with thousands of minors from Central America who are illegally crossing the U.S. border.
Eric Gay AP

A compromise appears to be emerging between Congress and the White House that would lead to the swift deportation of thousands of minors from Central America who have illegally crossed the border into the U.S.

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Business
2:59 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Picketing Truckers Raise Tensions At LA Port Amid Dockworker Talks

Picketers supporting independent truck drivers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach stand outside a container terminal.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

Labor tensions are high at the largest port complex in the country — Los Angeles and Long Beach — which handles nearly half of all the cargo coming into the United States.

Short-haul truck drivers are striking. They're the independent, contract truckers who bring the containers off the ships to nearby warehouses for companies like Wal-Mart and Costco. At the twin ports, their numbers hover around 10,000.

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The Two-Way
2:33 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

No Charges For Police Who Killed Woman After D.C. Chase

Capitol Hill police officers look at a car belonging to Miriam Carey after she was shot and killed on Oct. 3 following a high-speed car chase that started near the White House.
Charles Dharapak AP

The Justice Department has decided not to bring criminal charges against two police who shot and killed a woman after a wild car chase from the White House to the grounds of the U.S. Capitol last fall.

The woman, 34-year-old Miriam Carey of Stanford, Conn., struck a security officer with her car near the White House on Oct. 3 before driving off at high speed. Carey's 1-year-old daughter was in the car at the time of the incident but was unharmed.

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The Salt
2:33 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Alcohol Test: Does Eating Yeast Keep You From Getting Drunk?

The idea that it might be possible to keep drinking a delicious bottle of pinot noir or tall bottle of beer and go right back to work is a tempting one.
Alex Eben Meyer for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 4:52 pm

Sometimes we drink with the sole purpose of relaxing, or drowning the week's worries. But other times we just want to savor a special craft beer or vintage wine, or make that good meal taste even better.

And as we get older, we're warier of that third or fourth glass. The consequences of too much alcohol — the drowsiness, the confusion and the wobbling — are a bigger hindrance. And let's face it: A hangover at 36 isn't the same as one at 22.

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Shots - Health News
2:32 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Doctors Face Ethical Issues In Benching Kids With Concussions

If parents won't bench a child after a concussion, is it OK for the doctor to tell the coach?
iStockphoto

Doctors have gotten much better at diagnosing and treating sports-related concussions, which is a good thing since Americans suffer up to 4 million sports-related concussions a year.

But we're not so good at is following their advice.

Student athletes and parents sometimes balk at doctors' recommendations to avoid play until concussion symptoms are gone, or to cut back on schoolwork. Both have been shown to speed recovery, and getting another hit on a vulnerable brain increases the risk of long-term problems.

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Medical Treatments
2:18 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

HIV Returns In Infected Toddler, Dashing Hopes Of Imminent Cure

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

Federal officials have announced that a young Mississippi girl, once thought to have been cured of HIV, now once again has detectable levels of the virus. This is a setback not just for the child, but also for hope of eradicating HIV in infants with a potent mix of drugs at birth.

All Tech Considered
2:08 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

KizON went on sale in South Korea this week, with North America and Europe to follow later this year. Its price has not yet been announced.
LG

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 4:51 pm

I was always thankful that my parents didn't "leash me" at the mall or grocery store when I was a child — but you'll never guess what parents can strap on their kids nowadays.

LG Electronics introduced a device Wednesday called the KizON. Meant for those in preschool and primary school, it's essentially a kid-tracking wristband.

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Politics
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

In The High Drama Of Its 1964 Convention, GOP Hung A Right Turn

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

In advance of the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Republican Convention, Robert Siegel speaks with The New York Times writer-at-large Sam Tanenhaus. They discuss the impact that the Civil Rights Act, passed earlier that year, had on the nomination of Barry Goldwater.

Around the Nation
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

The Hopes And Hazards Of The 17-Story Water Slide

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

Kansas City now boasts the world's tallest water slide. At about 17 stories high, the slide had been postponed multiple times during construction after tests went bad. As Frank Morris of KCUR reports, the slide is attracting thrill-seekers and naysayers alike.

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Parallels
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

After Losing An Only Child, Chinese Parents Face Old Age Alone

A man looks at the painting Better To Have Only One Child at the China National Art Museum in Beijing. More than three decades after China's one-child policy took hold, some bereaved parents are suffering an unintended consequence of the policy: The loss of a child leaves them with no support in their old age.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

It's been nearly 3 1/2 decades since China's government started limiting most urban families to one child. The family planning policy successfully slowed the nation's population growth, but it has had some unintended consequences.

One is that some parents lose their only children to illness or accidents and end up with no one to care for them in their old age. Now, these parents have gotten together to demand their rights.

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Middle East
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Deaths Mount Into The Dozens As Gaza Strip Bombardment Builds

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

Israeli air strikes continue to pound the Gaza Strip. NPR's Emily Harris reports from Gaza on the intensifying conflict there.

Europe
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Amid Eroding Trust, Germany Expels America's Top Spy In Berlin

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

Germany has asked the CIA station chief in Berlin to leave the country. This comes as two Germans are under investigation for spying for the U.S. in Germany. While tensions between the allies are high, both countries are trying not to strain relations too far.

Law
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Justice Dept. Declines To Step Into Dispute Between CIA And Senators

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

The Justice Department has declined to bring criminal charges against anyone at the CIA or the Senate Intelligence Committee, in a dispute over access to sensitive materials on enhanced interrogations. The power struggle relates to a long-running Senate probe over the mistreatment of detainees after Sept. 11.

Parallels
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

In West Africa, Officials Target Ignorance And Fear Over Ebola

Government health workers administer blood tests to check for the Ebola virus in Kenema, Sierra Leone, June 25.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:04 pm

There's growing concern in West Africa about the spread of the Ebola virus that has killed hundreds of people. Health ministers have formed a regional response, but fear and a lack of knowledge about Ebola threaten their efforts.

Liberian musicians are joining the campaign, taking to song to educate people about the Ebola virus. Their tune is called "Ebola in Town," and warns people to beware of close contact with those who fall ill. The song warns, "Don't touch your friend."

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Goats and Soda
2:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Maasai Warriors: Caught Between Spears and Cellphones

Philip Kisaikae and another Maasai warrior swap email addresses with Juan Carlos Vera, who attended this summer's Smithsonian Folklife Festival.
Ryan Kellman NPR

In the dusty savannah, Maasai warriors go about their day dressed in vibrant red and magenta robes, or shukas. Elaborate beaded jewelry dangle from the necks and faces of men and women — members of one of Kenya's oldest tribes. And some of them can be seen carrying a spear in one hand and, in the other – wait, is that a cellphone?

It wouldn't be an uncommon sight. Stephen Moiko, a Maasai warrior himself, tells me that everybody uses a cellphone, even his own grandmother.

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Shots - Health News
1:27 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Why HIV Spreads Less Easily In Heterosexual Couples

HIV particles (red) invade a human immune cell. When HIV is transmitted through sex, only the strongest versions of the virus establish long-term infection.
Chris Bjornberg/ScienceSource

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:07 pm

HIV is sexist.

A woman is twice as likely to catch the virus from an infected partner in a heterosexual relationship than a man is.

And homosexual men are at even greater risk. They're more than 20 times as likely to get infected from an HIV-positive partner than partners in a heterosexual relationship.

Now scientists at Microsoft Research and the Zambia-Emory HIV Project have a clue about why these disparities exist.

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The Two-Way
1:24 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

No Criminal Charges In Senate-CIA Spat, Justice Department Says

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein alleged in March that the CIA violated federal law by searching computers used by her staff. On Thursday, the Justice Department declined to bring criminal charges against anyone at the CIA or the Senate panel.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 1:32 pm

The Justice Department has declined to bring criminal charges against anyone at the CIA or the Senate Intelligence Committee in a dispute over access to documents about the enhanced interrogation program the U.S. deployed against detainees after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Prosecutors notified the Senate panel Thursday of their decision, a muted end to a power struggle that had undermined relations between the intelligence community and its chief overseers on Capitol Hill.

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The Two-Way
1:15 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Eileen Ford, Creator Of The Supermodel, Dies At 92

Eileen Ford with two of her famous models, Cheryl Tiegs (left) and Cristina Ferrare, in New York in 1983. Ford died on Wednesday at age 92.
Marty Lederhandler AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:58 pm

Eileen Ford, who is credited with inventing the modern modeling business and in the process launching the careers of supermodels such as Lauren Hutton, Christie Brinkley and Naomi Campbell, has died at 92.

A spokeswoman who handles public relations for Ford Models confirmed Wednesday's death, which follows a fall Ford took last week at her New York apartment.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Philadelphia Judge Denies Former Nazi Guard Bail

The main gate of the Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz I in Poland, where Johann "Hans" Breyer served as a guard.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 1:54 pm

A former Nazi camp guard, who is awaiting extradition to Germany, has been denied bail by a judge in Philadelphia, though his defense lawyers argued that the 89-year-old is in failing health.

Lawyers said Johann "Hans" Breyer had heart disease and dementia, and had suffered a stroke in recent years. But on Tuesday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Timothy Rice denied the bail request.

The Associated Press reports:

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Goats and Soda
12:23 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

He Never Really Liked Soccer Until He Made A Movie About It

Amputees in Sierra Leone have started their own soccer league.
Courtesy of Netflix

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 2:24 pm

Juan Rendon never really liked soccer.

Sure, he played the game and followed the professional leagues a bit when he was growing up in Colombia in the 1980s and early '90s. But he thought soccer was boring. And he came to believe it was corrupt as well, in an era when drug cartels and soccer clubs often had close ties.

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Code Switch
12:17 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Dress Codes Are Open To Interpretation — And A Lot Of Contention

This spot forbids "urban wear" — and also orthodontia, apparently.
memestate flickr

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 1:37 pm

A Minneapolis nightspot called Bar Louie landed in the news after some local residents took issue with its new dress code.

No flat-billed hats. No long white T-shirts. No large chains. No sleeveless under shirts. No athletic apparel. No sports jerseys without collars. No excessively baggy clothing.

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Goats and Soda
11:46 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Ebola 101: The Facts Behind A Frightening Virus

Medical workers with the nonprofit Doctors Without Borders treat a woman for Ebola in Gueckedou, Guinea. Despite their protective gear, the workers try to maintain human contact with patients by talking with them and getting close enough to look into their eyes.
Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 2:36 pm

Health workers have called the Ebola outbreak in West Africa unprecedented, overwhelming and even out of control.

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