Around the Nation
5:25 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Research Examines Newly-Drafted NFL Quarterbacks

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 7:21 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Two-Way
4:31 am
Thu April 26, 2012

After Conviction, Pakistani Prime Minister 'Imprisoned' For Just A Few Minutes

Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani as he arrived at court today in Islamabad.
Aamir Qureshi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 3:15 pm

Convicted today of contempt for refusing to push for the reopening of a corruption case involving Pakistan's president, Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani was given a prison sentence that lasted just a few minutes.

"The ruling ... appeared to be a compromise," The Associated Press writes, "but could still mean problems for him because he has been convicted in a court. That means he could face dismissal from office in the weeks, or more likely, months to come."

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The Two-Way
4:08 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Conflicting Claims On Cause And Death Toll After Explosion In Syria

While activists inside Syria say government forces are responsible for an explosion today in the city of Hama, and that about 70 people were killed, President Bashar Assad's regime has a much different story. It says about 16 people were killed by an explosion at a bomb factory used by "armed terrorist groups," the BBC reports.

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Dustin Dwyer is a reporter for a new project at Michigan Radio that will look at improving economic opportunities for low-income children. Previously, he worked as an online journalist for Changing Gears, as a freelance reporter and as Michigan Radio's West Michigan Reporter. Before he joined Michigan Radio, Dustin interned at NPR's Talk of the Nation, wrote freelance stories for The Jackson Citizen-Patriot and completed a Reporting & Writing Fellowship at the Poynter Institute.

The Two-Way
3:09 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Liberia's Charles Taylor Facing Judgment In War Crimes Case

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor, in court on Feb. 8, 2011.
Jerry Lampen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 12:04 pm

  • NPR's Eric Westervelt reporting from The Hague

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor is guilty of "aiding and abetting" forces in Sierra Leone that committed war crimes and other atrocities during a war that lasted more than a decade and left more than 50,000 people dead, the Special Court for Sierra Leone ruled today.

Taylor, the first head of state since just after World War II to be judged by an international tribunal, "knew that his support" would assist and encourage fighters who were committing war crimes, the tribunal ruled. In return, he received so-called blood diamonds from Sierra Leone.

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Asia
3:05 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Pakistan's Prime Minister Found Guilty Of Contempt

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 7:21 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Pakistan faces even more political uncertainty. The country's supreme court today found the prime minister guilty of contempt of court. Prime Minister Yusuf Raza Gilani had resisted demands by the court that he press authorities in Switzerland to pursue money laundering charges there against his boss, the president of Pakistan. NPR's Julie McCarthy has been following this story. She was at the court in Islamabad.

Hi, Julie.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

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Asia
2:45 am
Thu April 26, 2012

U.S. Considers Ways To Keep Drones In Pakistan

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 7:21 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's follow up on the controversy over the American use of drones in Pakistan. Over the past few years, no issue has done quite as much to inflame public sentiment and stir anti-American feelings in Pakistan as drone strikes.

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Asia
2:45 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Pakistani Moms Keep Sons From Being Radicalized

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 10:32 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

As we just heard from Jackie, most drone strikes are in areas along the border with Afghanistan, places overrun in recent years by the Pakistani Taliban and other radical groups. And our next guest is using a form of soft power to fight terrorism there: mothers. Mossarat Qadeem is deploying mothers to pull their sons back from militancy.

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Business
2:45 am
Thu April 26, 2012

After Backlash, Ethanol Industry Is Thriving

Young corn plants grow next to the Guardian Energy ethanol plant in Janesville, Minn. Five years ago, the U.S. government projected that in 2012, ethanol production would use up 30 percent of the nation's corn supply. Last year, it used 40 percent.
Glen Stubbe MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 11:28 am

Five years ago, ethanol was seen as the next big thing to wean the U.S. off foreign oil. Then some studies on the corn-based fuel cast doubt on its environmental benefits, and auto companies turned their attention to hybrids and electric cars. The hype died off, but the ethanol industry is alive and well, driving a big change in America's corn consumption.

Rising up out of the corn fields outside Lake Odessa, Mich., is the ethanol refinery for Carbon Green Bioenergy. The company's CEO, Mitch Miller, says a lot of refineries were popping up when this one was built in 2006.

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Politics
2:45 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Obama To Begin Campaigning In Earnest

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 7:21 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

For the president, next week is being billed as the official launch of his re-election campaign. Mr. Obama will be holding rallies in the swing states of Ohio and Virginia. But it would be hard to tell a difference from this week, when Mr. Obama made a tour of college campuses in three other battleground states.

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