KUNM

Election 2012 in New Mexico

Let's Talk New Mexico's Closed Primaries

May 29, 2018
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Let's Talk New Mexico 5/31 8a: New Mexico has a closed primary system, so if you aren’t registered with a major political party, you can’t vote in primary elections. That means about 24 percent of registered voters here are sitting out Tuesday’s primary. Is this a necessary part of the political process, having party members select their nominees? Or does a closed primary system exclude too many voters? We’d like to hear from you! Email LetsTalk@KUNM.org, tweet #LetsTalkNM or call in live during the show.

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February 10, 2018: Trump defends former aide accused of spousal abuse; Female candidates flock to midterm races; Sri Lanka requires 25 percent of candidates be women; British officials consider pardoning suffragettes; UN chief warns more women and girls will be subject to female genital mutilation with out accelerated action; Hashtag #MosqueMeTo draws attention to assault during Haj; Iranian protests target mandatory hijabs; Veteran producer connected to Weinstein scandals commits suicide; UN pushes for efforts to overcome biases against women and girls in STEM fields; Girl Scout sees big

Victor Onimole / KUNM

Republican Dan Lewis gathered in a Downtown ballroom with his supporters to make sense of what happened. “This has always been about a cause, that is, to make the city better, to make Albuquerque thrive, to make it safer, and you believe in that,” he said. “I know you believed in it, you still do, and I do also.”

Lewis congratulated Democrat Tim Keller on his win but said he’s not done trying to change the city.

StockSnap via Pixabay / Creative Commons

New Mexico voters overwhelmingly support public financing as a way to counter big money in elections, according to a new report by the Center for the Study of Voting, Elections and Democracy.

Melorie Begay/KUNM

The youngest of Albuquerque’s mayoral hopefuls got only 6.8 percent of the vote on Tuesday. But Gus Pedrotty plans to have an impact on the city even without the title of mayor.

The 22-year-old candidate was surrounded by teachers, physicists, and doctors at his watch party at Boese Brother’s Brewery. Despite his loss, Gus Pedrotty was enthusiastic about his experience in the campaign. Will he run for office again?

succo via Pixabay / public domain

National elections get a lot of attention and press, but local ones? Not so much. And some folks say it’s those local races that have a bigger impact on your everyday life.

There are a slew of candidates running for mayor in Albuquerque. And the last two city elections here saw low voter turnout. The deadline to register to vote in October is the end of day on Tuesday, Sept. 5, but Viki Harrison of Common Cause says that’s way too early. 

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These mayoral forums are a chance to meet and learn about Albuquerque’s mayoral candidates. Topics covered include public safety and police, public health, the economy, and much more. Check them out.

State of the City Mayoral Forum 
Organized by ABQ Center for Peace and Justice
Friday, September 1,  6 – 8 PM
North Domingo Baca Multigenerational Center
7521 Carmel Ave NE

Lawmakers Consider Automatic Voter Registration Bill

Jan 30, 2017
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The state Motor Vehicle Division would pull info on drivers and register them to vote—if they are eligible—according to a bill that is being considered by lawmakers in Santa Fe during this year’s legislative session.

NPR Election Night Live Blog

Nov 8, 2016

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Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Candidates in this year’s presidential election have been tight-lipped about the fight against an oil pipeline in North Dakota and how demonstrators there are being treated by police. That’s weighing on Sharon Chavez, who is Navajo and Hopi-Tewa. She’s a retired educator who’s lived in San Felipe Pueblo for 47 years. She talked with KUNM about what it means for her as a woman to vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton for president.

Courtesy of Yesenia Luna

Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump has escalated the national battle over immigration and race in America with his views on Mexican immigrants and building a wall for border security. KUNM talked to Yesenia Luna, a pre-law student at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, about how the national rhetoric affected her ballot.

The opioid epidemic is a national crisis, and in Northern New Mexico it’s a problem that’s been around for decades.

For the latest in our Voices Behind the Vote series, KUNM visited the home of an addiction counselor in Rio Arriba County to hear about her thoughts on substance abuse and the presidential race.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Mountainair is a small town in New Mexico about an hour and a half southeast of Albuquerque. It’s got one streetlight and one gas station. Pastor Darrell Roberts says he likes living out in the open where people look at things from a humble perspective and live a simpler—if usually less affluent—lifestyle.

As part of our Voices Behind The Vote series, KUNM talked with Pastor Roberts about what matters to him as Election Day comes down the tracks.

Ed Williams

Sexual assault, gender equality and women’s reproductive rights have taken center stage this election season, with controversial comments by Donald Trump galvanizing some voters’ support for Hillary Clinton.

KUNM met with one of those voters at a restaurant in Santa Fe to find out why she’s supporting the Democratic presidential ticket.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

If you live in a rural part of New Mexico where your nearest neighbor is miles away, it could be tempting to just tune out this year’s election. But David Doler says he can’t ignore things like Social Security, Medicare or any talk of infringing on a person’s right to keep and bear arms.

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

New Mexico’s struggled to recover fully from the recession, and it can still be a real challenge to find steady work in the state. That’s central to how 18-year-old Quinton Valencia is casting his vote this year. KUNM tagged along with Valencia as he applied for a job at Target in Rio Rancho.

Sarah Trujillo

Several thousand supporters showed up at Donald Trump’s last-minute campaign stop on Sunday night in Albuquerque. KUNM chatted with them as they waited in line at the private hangar near the city's airport.

Neither major party presidential candidate has made public education a central theme of their campaign in this year’s election. Still, some voters in New Mexico see education as one of the most important issues in our country.

One of those voters is John Sena, a teacher at Española Valley High School. 

Ed Williams / KUNM/Public Health New Mexico

Many New Mexicans cast their ballot for the candidate who best represents their religious and moral beliefs. For Catholic voters, that can often mean the candidate who opposes abortion rights. One of those voters is Robert Wall, a computer technician who coaches a kids’ swim team in Albuquerque. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

For many voters, choosing who should be commander in chief includes weighing how the United States will relate to the rest of the world. KUNM hung out in the classroom with a soldier who’s also a college student at the University of New Mexico. Joshua Ramirez is voting for the first time in 2016 because foreign affairs and national security are his top concerns.

qimono via Pixabay / public domain

KUNM Call In Show 10/27 8a: Election Day is November 8th this year and it's approaching fast. Many New Mexicans are already turning out to early vote in 2016. What issues do you think were missing from candidates' campaigns this year? 

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KUNM Call In Show 10/13 8a: The 2016 presidential election has been polarizing. Many of the biggest divides are over class, gender and race. We'll talk about how this election is highlighting voter attitudes on these important topics.

Why Don't More New Mexicans Vote?

Sep 14, 2016
Flickr photo by VoxFX

KUNM Call In Show 9/15 8a: A lot of New Mexicans don't vote in general elections - often nearly half the people who can legally vote here don't. And the stakes are high this November with a hotly contested presidential election at the top of the ticket. We’ll talk about why so many New Mexicans don't vote. Is it hard for you to make it to the polls? Are you turned off by the candidates that you have to choose from? Or are you ineligible to vote?

Elaine Baumgartel/KUNM

Thousands of Donald Trump supporters lined up outside the Albuquerque Convention Center Tuesday to hear the apparent Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump, speak. Here’s a bit of what some of them had to say about why they plan to vote for him.

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Andy Lyman/NMPoliticalReport.com

More than 7,000 people gathered in the Albuquerque Convention Center on Friday to hear Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speak. It was just hours after he spoke at the Santa Fe Community College. Enthusiastic supporters waited in a half-mile-long line for nearly an hour and hundreds were turned away when the venue was full.

KUNM’s Marino Spencer chatted with folks to find out why they’re ‘feelin’ the Bern.’

Lawmakers Eye Elections

Feb 12, 2016
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People, Power and Democracy is a project focusing on state government ethics and transparency.  Gwyneth Doland spoke with KUNM's Chris Boros.

Voters Could Choose Open Primaries

Jan 26, 2016
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New Mexico’s independent voters could be allowed to participate in primary elections if a proposed constitutional amendment is successful.

Low Turnout for Municipal Election

Oct 7, 2015
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Albuquerque voters went to the polls Tuesday to elect two city councilors for the Northeast Heights and Southeast Heights, and decide several bond issues to fund public transportation, the zoo and BioPark and and modernizing city water facilities.

Navajo Supreme Court Clarifies Source For Funding Election

Apr 14, 2015
Shehan 365 via Flickr

 

The Navajo Nation Supreme Court has settled the question of how to fund a belated presidential election.

The court says the tribe's controller can use money from a fund used to satisfy legal judgments and claims against the Navajo Nation.

The opinion came after the tribe's Department of Justice asked the court to clarify how $317,000 legally could be transferred to the election office.

Navajo Attorney General Harrison Tsosie said Tuesday that his office is evaluating the court's opinion.

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