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Young Women United

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

An Albuquerque police officer was honored in front of the whole country during the State of the Union address earlier this week. While on duty, he met a woman who was addicted to heroin and adopted her baby. More and more pregnant women are struggling with addiction in the state. But attitudes can be harsh, services are limited and funding is tight, leaving people with nowhere to turn.

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An Albuquerque police officer will be among President Donald Trump’s guests at the State of the Union tonight. Officer Ryan Holets met a pregnant woman struggling with addiction on the streets last year and wound up adopting her baby. Many women are facing the same situation—and the detox and treatment options are limited. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Let’s Talk New Mexico 12/7 8a: Emerging reports of sexual abuse and misconduct are toppling more men in power every week. Newspapers are investigating allegations against men in politics and entertainment. Celebrities sparked a flood of #MeToo stories by sharing their experiences on social media. But what do you do when you don’t have that kind of fame or cultural cachet? And when more is at stake than just another job? And what about people who work in businesses without policies or HR departments? Let’s talk #MeToo, and the workers of New Mexico who haven’t yet been centered in this national conversation.

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New Mexico’s teen pregnancy rate has been cut in half over the last two decades, but it remains one of the highest in the country.

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UPDATED 2/16 7a:

Several groups that were in favor of a bail reform measure are yanking their support after a House committee amended it Monday, Feb. 15. 

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KUNM Call In Show 10/1 8a:

Teen pregnancy rates have gone down across the country in recent years, but New Mexico continues to have one of the highest teen birth rates in the nation. 

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The number of babies born addicted to drugs has risen sharply over the last decade or so in New Mexico. KUNM’s Public Health reporter Marisa Demarco brings us this story of how stigma surrounding addiction and pregnancy is contributing to the increase.

Mia just gave birth to a healthy baby boy even though she was addicted to methamphetamine until about a month and a half before he was born. Her name has been changed in this story to protect her identity. "My number one fear when I was using while pregnant was to lose him or him being born with something wrong," she said

Art by Nani Chacon courtesy of Young Women United

A local advocacy organization is looking at reforming the way the judicial system treats women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Young Women United traveled to Santa Fe last week to make four recommendations to the Criminal Justice Reform Subcommittee. Among them, judges should acknowledge pregnancy and lactation status when determining the conditions of bond or release.