KUNM

Valle de Oro

Young Scientists Measure Wildfire Threat

Jul 8, 2016
City of Albuquerque / Creative Commons via Flickr

For the folks beating back flames during New Mexico’s dry season, knowing the science behind fire behavior can save lives and property. Members of the Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) are collecting information on fuel loads, which are the amount of wood on a forest floor that could sustain a fire. The hope is that the data will help firefighters predict the direction and intensity of a blaze.

Ed Williams

The new Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge is a place of firsts: it’s the first urban wildlife refuge in the Southwest and the first wildlife refuge in the country to have an environmental justice plan. It's also the first time kids in one largely Hispanic community have had a wild outdoor space to play in close by.

Bothering Birds via Compfight CC

Albuquerque’s Environment Department has denied the permit for a company to build a hot-mix asphalt plant near a wildlife refuge in the South Valley.

The department was slated to hold hearings about the plant, but before those were set, found that Albuquerque Asphalt’s plan could generate contaminant levels that exceed air quality standards.

fws.gov

  

Albuquerque’s Environmental Health Department is going to hold hearings on a proposal to build an around-the-clock hot-mix asphalt plant less than half a mile from the Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge in the South Valley. The department received 156 public comments on the plan. 

The public comment period ends Saturday, April 4, about an asphalt plant that could go in near a wildlife reserve in the South Valley. Albuquerque Asphalt applied for a permit to build at hot-mix asphalt plant, and neighbors are concerned that the site for the plant is too close to the Valle de Oro Wildlife Refuge. It’s a little more than half a mile away.