KUNM

Taxes

Governor Martinez Restores University Funds, Vetoes Taxes

May 27, 2017
Heath Haussamen / New Mexico In Depth

Republican New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez restored funding Friday to all state colleges and universities that she had vetoed earlier by tapping money from suspended infrastructure projects, while rejecting a string of tax increases proposed by the Democratic-led Legislature.

Governor Martinez Draws Line Against Tax-And-Spend Bills

Apr 8, 2017
Heath Haussamen / New Mexico In Depth

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez stripped all funding for the state Legislature along with state universities and colleges from a proposed budget for the coming fiscal year, using her veto pen Friday to escalate a confrontation with lawmakers over how to shore up shaky state finances.

LISTEN: How Should New Mexico Fix Its Budget?

Jan 24, 2017
Illustration by ccPixs.com

 

KUNM Call In Show 1/26 8a: Lawmakers have converged on Santa Fe for a two-month session during which their most pressing problem will be fixing a big hole in the state’s budget. This week we’ll talk about the governor’s proposal to cut already trimmed state funding and ask state employees to pay more into their retirement funds. We'll hear from Democratic lawmakers who say it’s not fair to make workers pay more before eliminating tax breaks for the wealthy and big business. 

Bid To Raise Gas Tax Stalls Over Politics

Mar 4, 2016
https://www.flickr.com/photos/87913776@N00/460375914

Over the past few years New Mexico has used short-term solutions to balance the budget without raising taxes. But if oil and gas prices stay low, it will become more and more of a challenge to find the money the state needs to pay the bills.

Raising at least some taxes might not be politically popular, but Sen. John Arthur Smith, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, argues it’s the fiscally conservative thing to do. And he wants to start with the gas tax.

thetutoress.com / Creative Commons License

The Bernalillo County Commission voted last night to postpone a tax hike for a special session that will likely happen next week. The one-quarter of 1 percent tax increase on goods and services would be divided up as follows: Half of it would go to mental health and substance abuse treatment services, and half of it would go to the county’s operational budget.

Andreas Demmelbauer / Creative Commons License

A New Mexico company rejects tax incentives to leave the state and the solar industry takes a hit in the international market.