KUNM

state budget

WerbeFabrikvia pixabay / creative commons license

The New Mexico Human Services Department has been considering charging Medicaid recipients copays in an effort to save money from the state’s cash-strapped budget. The proposals were met with strong opposition in public meetings earlier this year. But the state is moving forward with the changes anyway. 

Elaine Baumgartel / KUNM

The state Supreme Court decided that there’s still a way for Gov. Susana Martinez and lawmakers to work out their differences during a special session, so it doesn’t have to weigh in right now. The high court canceled a hearing Monday in a case the Legislature brought against the executive about some of her many vetoes. 

LISTEN: What's It Cost To Get Tough On Crime?

Mar 6, 2017
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ze_valdi/7556549414/

KUNM Call In Show 3/9 8a: Violent crimes have stolen headlines over the last year, while property crimes remain a persistently unpleasant part of life all over New Mexico. Lawmakers in Santa Fe are debating how to reduce crime—but with little money available to do it. Which ideas could reduce crime and save money? Which sound good but cost a lot and have no guarantee? And which proposals have more to do with politics than anything else? 

Budget Crisis Hits New Mexico Classrooms

Feb 20, 2017
Hannah Colton/KUNM

In January, Governor Susana Martinez signed off on a plan to use $46 million from public schools' cash reserves to fill part of this year’s budget gap.

Education spending in New Mexico still hasn’t recovered from the 2008 recession, and as oil and gas revenues continue to stagnate, schools are bracing for more cuts. 

Clever Cupcakes via Flickr / Creative Commons

 

KUNM Callin Show 2/16 8a: New Mexico expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act and the number of people covered by the program will grow to more than 900,000 by the end of June. That's about 44 percent of the state's population.

Tax Credits via Flickr / Creative Commons

State lawmakers in Santa Fe are wrestling with a fiscal crisis. And the debate is familiar: cut spending or raise taxes in order to balance the budget. How would voters solve this problem?

LISTEN: How Should New Mexico Fix Its Budget?

Jan 24, 2017
Illustration by ccPixs.com

 

KUNM Call In Show 1/26 8a: Lawmakers have converged on Santa Fe for a two-month session during which their most pressing problem will be fixing a big hole in the state’s budget. This week we’ll talk about the governor’s proposal to cut already trimmed state funding and ask state employees to pay more into their retirement funds. We'll hear from Democratic lawmakers who say it’s not fair to make workers pay more before eliminating tax breaks for the wealthy and big business. 

Priorities For The Special Session

Sep 26, 2016
Gwyneth Doland

KUNM Call In Show 9/29/ 8a: Governor Susana Martinez expected to soon call lawmakers back to Santa Fe for a special session. They must deal with a budget deficit from the last fiscal year and a projected drop in revenue for the current fiscal year. But the governor also wants them to consider her proposal to bring back the death penalty in some cases. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 2009.

AgencjaAIAC via Pixabay / creative commons license

An organization based in Santa Fe is hoping lawmakers will consider a plan in an upcoming special session that would raise taxes on all alcoholic beverages. The group recently commissioned a poll that found a majority of New Mexicans are in favor that idea—but Governor Susana Martinez has said she won’t support any kind of tax hike.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

More than 20 organizations joined together Tuesday to call on lawmakers not to cut funding for behavioral health services. 

Ask 'Does It Work?' To Make Better Budget

Feb 15, 2016
kenteegardin via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The state Senate has passed a proposal that would ask parts of state government to start doing more research on which of their programs delivers the best return on investment.

James Tourtellotte via CC

    

There were 5,406 untested sexual assault evidence kits in the state at the end of last year, according to the state auditor. A pair of bills to tackle the problem cleared their first hurdles on Tuesday, Feb. 2.