SCOTUS

Ed Williams

      

The crowds on the street corner outside Hobby Lobby were mostly civil, though emotions were running high. Several dozen men and women waved signs at oncoming traffic calling for a boycott of the craft store and decrying the Supreme Court’s decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby.

One protester, Natalie Hrizi, was busy passing around a petition to have congress revisit the issue.

zacklur-Flickr

Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby, the U.S. Supreme Court ruling striking down part of the Affordable Care Act’s mandate for employer-provided contraceptive coverage, is sparking both praise and condemnation here in New Mexico.

Local abortion rights groups are decrying the decision. Denicia Cadena is communications director at Young Women United, an advocacy group for women of color in New Mexico.

Melanie Capobianco, Veronica's adoptive mother.

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the South Carolina couple caring for "Baby Veronica." The ruling could threaten the stability of the Indian Child Welfare Act, and raises questions about tribal membership.

On his way to deployment in Iraq, Cherokee tribal member Dustin Brown was asked to relinquish his parental rights by the unwed mother of his child, and days before beginning his tour, the mother gave baby Veronica up for adoption.

Upon learning this, Brown sought custody, and eighteen months after filing for custody, Veronica was returned to Brown.