Santa Fe

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The Santa Fe City Council adopted an $82 million budget on Wednesday, May 25. Councilors devoted part of the city’s funds to addressing poverty and climate change in the capital.

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UPDATED 5/12 6a: The Santa Fe City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to raise the number of approved short-term rental units in the city from 350 to 1000. The New Mexican reports 19 people made public comments on the plan, some concerned, others supportive.

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Santa Fe is an expensive place to live. But it’s also an expensive place to build. Affordable housing and the bottom line of developers often clash. 

Ed Williams

Living in Santa Fe has gotten more and more expensive over the years. Today, home prices in New Mexico’s capital city are higher than almost anywhere else in the state. So, what happens when people don’t earn enough to make it there?

via PullTogether.org

When state officials unveiled a $2.7 million ad campaign aimed at improving the quality of life for New Mexico kids this week, Catholic leaders responded with criticism, releasing a statement saying it takes more than advertising to fight a problem as big and as severe as child abuse.

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The state’s Medicaid Advisory Committee is meeting Friday afternoon in Santa Fe to talk about budget shortfalls. 

One lawmaker called it the tightest budget in memory after the legislative session ended last month. And advocates are warning that Medicaid will be millions short, which could mean higher fees for low-income patients, lower rates for providers and limited job growth in the health care field. About 40 percent of the state’s population is covered by Medicaid after the expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

Bruce Wetherbee

How clean was the hospital when you were there? How well did nurses and doctors explain things to you? When answering these questions, people in New Mexico ranked state facilities poorly, according to federal survey data that was just released. Local union members say that’s because hospitals like the one in Santa Fe run on staffs that are too small in order to pinch pennies.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

The health care employees union used a Santa Fe hospital’s low patient rating as grounds to call for help from city officials on Friday morning. 

Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center did worse than most hospitals in the state in recent patient surveys, scoring only two of five stars.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

The Associated Press looked at data from medical facilities for veterans around the U.S. and reported that four in New Mexico were among the worst when it comes to long waits for appointments. 

Veterans using VA clinics in Farmington, Santa Fe and Rio Rancho, and the hospital in Albuquerque, might be waiting a long time for health care. Those facilities were near the top of the AP’s list, with Farmington coming in No. 6—out of 940. 

LISTEN: Raising The Minimum Wage

Mar 11, 2015
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KUNM Call In Show 3/12 8a: 

Lawmakers in Santa Fe are considering proposals that would raise the state's minimum wage. The cities of Santa Fe, Albuquerque and Las Cruces have already done this and lawmakers are also reviewing a measure that would prevent more cities from raising their minimum wages. 

Who benefits from an increase in the minimum wage? Who is harmed? And at what point does a minimum wage equal a living wage? 

We'd like to hear from you! Email callinshow@kunm.org, post your comments online or call in live during the show. 

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School districts in New Mexico are stepping up their enforcement of vaccination rules in the wake of recent measles outbreaks in other parts of the country. Santa Fe Public Schools will begin turning away students who haven’t met the requirements Tuesday. School Board President Steve Carrillo says the district is enforcing state policy that’s already in place. 

Santa Fe Reporter

Santa Fe mayor David Cross has announced that same sex marriage is legal in New Mexico, and is encouraging same sex couples in the state to apply for marriage licenses from their county clerks office.
Mayor Coss and Santa Fe city attorney Geno Zamora concluded that same sex marriage is legal in the state because the way New Mexico’s constitution defines marriage is gender neutral and does not explicitly prohibit same sex marriage, and requires equal treatment on the basis of sex. The two say the next step for Santa Fe will be to pass a resolution codifying state law.

via www.unm.edu

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the births of two important figures in Western art and science: Felix Mendelssohn and Charles Darwin.

Courtesy of Creative Commons by Yoshi

When state lawmakers convene for a special session tomorrow in Santa Fe, they'll face the daunting task of dealing with a $650 million budget deficit. Many advocates are saying tax cuts for the wealthy should be repealed.

KUNM's Elaine Baumgartel wanted to find out how much the 2003 tax cuts actually cost the state and exactly which taxpayers have benefited the most.