KUNM

Prosperity Works

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

More than three years after the health care expansion, 43 percent of New Mexico’s total population is signed up for Medicaid. But budgets are tight, and the Human Services Department is trying to figure out how to make it all work. Some of the  proposals presented at a public meeting in Albuquerque were contentious.

taberandrew via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Lawmakers voted Wednesday to study a plan that would make small dollar loans available to state employees. At 26 percent interest, the loans would offer options for low income borrowers who have traditionally turned to high interest storefront loans.

NMPBS

The United States is the only industrialized country without mandatory paid leave for new parents.

New Mexico PBS looks at efforts to expand paid leave on Public Square, a program that explores community engagement through meaningful dialogue. 

In this clip, host and producer Megan Kamerick speaks with Professor Harry Van Buren of the Anderson School of Management at UNM, and Ona Porter, CEO of Prosperity Works.

The program airs Thursday 2/26 at 7p on New Mexico PBS Channel 5 TV. 

Daquella manera via Flickr

The average person who takes out a short-term loan borrows about $650 and pays about 340 percent interest.  But rates on payday, title and installment loans would be capped at 36 percent if reformers get their way during the 2015 legislative session.

There were 657 small loan companies in New Mexico in 2013, many charging more than 175 percent, according to a report from the state Regulation and Licensing Department.