Juan Labreche / Associated Press

Police shootings around the country are causing protests and outcry, and video footage from many of these shootings is shedding new light on the moments before a person is killed by law enforcement.

Here in New Mexico, a video ignited demonstrations and drew national attention after two Albuquerque Police Department officers shot and killed James Boyd in March of 2014. They’re now on trial for murder.  

AP Photo / Juan Labreche / Associated Press

Defense attorneys in the murder trial of the former Albuquerque police officers who killed James Boyd spent Tuesday trying to pick apart the credibility of an expert witness for the prosecution.

Juan Labreche / Associated Press / Associated Presss

In opening statements in the trial of two former Albuquerque police officers, prosecutor Randi McGinn said the death of homeless camper James Boyd in the Sandia Foothills was no accident or mistake. 

Lawyers delivered opening statements and the Albuquerque Police Department’s chief took the stand in the first day of the trial for two former officers facing murder charges after killing a homeless camper in 2014. 

Rita Daniels / KUNM

After video of police killing a homeless man in Albuquerque went viral in 2014, hundreds of demonstrators began calling for justice and an end to police brutality. A murder trial for those two officers begins Monday, Sept. 19. 

Safe Kids

Aug 8, 2016
Katie Stone

The Children's Hour explored some simple strategies to promote safe habits for kids as we reenter the school year with special guests Albuquerque Police Officer Drobik and our friend Brennan. Plus we had an in studio performance with the Austin Lounge Lizards! Great music, a family events calendar, the KUNM Kids Birthday Club, every Saturday from 9 to 10am on KUNM.

hugovk via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 7/14 8a: This week, we want to hear your response to recent police shootings of African Americans—and the killing of five Dallas police officers. How do you think the shootings of officers in Dallas have affected the national conversation on race and policing? What are the ripple effects of these deaths right here at home in New Mexico? How has the widespread anger and fear affected police officers and their ability to do their jobs? How are activists taking care of themselves in the face of a problem that's hard to gain ground with? 

Sun. 07/19 11a: We asked a number of different stakeholders for their top ideas about improving the relationship between citizens and their law enforcement officers – a relationship that has certainly been strained in some U.S. communities in recent years. Current and former police officers, city councilors, community leaders, police trainers, and criminologists all suggest ways to bring more peace around the sometimes frayed connection between citizens and police.

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol via flickr

In March the New Mexico state Legislature unanimously passed a bill that would basically eliminate what critics call “policing for profit,” the ability of law enforcement agencies to seize cars, cash and other property police say were used in committing a crime. The practice originated in the 1980s as a tool to fight back against big drug dealers, but civil liberties groups on the right and left of the political spectrum say the lure of big money has now corrupted government agencies, who use the law to pad their coffers.


Rita Daniels

Tuesday marked the first of 10 meetings of the Collaborative on Police-Community Relations in Albuquerque. Police officers and commanders attended, along with grieving families, mental health advocates and neighborhood association representatives.

Mayor Richard Berry said the process should yield a document that outlines expectations for effective community policing.  The Department of Justice investigated APD after a high-number of officer-involved shootings, and findings indicated city police use excessive force.

Race Relations And Police Use Of Force

Aug 18, 2014
hugovk via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 8/21 8a.m.

Images from the ongoing protests in Ferguson, MO have starkly outlined the reality of racial inequality and police militarization throughout the United States. Has this led to an "us v. them" mindset both within a police force and for community members?  And how much do the levels of fear and distrust increase when the make-up of a department doesn't reflect a community's ethnic and/or racial composition?  

kmillard92 via Flickr / Creative Commons License

A study released this week highlights severe problems among police in the violent Mexican border city of Juarez. From the Changing America Desk, Monica Ortiz Uribe reports half of the officers admit to engaging in corrupt acts.