Navajo Nation

Public Health New Mexico
5:50 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Navajo Nation To Tax Junk Food

Credit Jeff Adair via Flickr

Residents of the Navajo Nation will now be paying more for junk food. Last week Navajo President Ben Shelly signed the Healthy Dine' Nation Act into law, adding a tax on unhealthy food sold anywhere on Navajo land. Deswood Tome is Special Advisor to President Shelly. He spoke to KUNM about the law's implications. 

"The law imposes a tax on junk food as a deterrent, so when people go to the store they'll make a conscious decision to buy nutritious food," Tome said.

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Local News
12:00 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

Navajo Nation To Improve 911 Service

Credit Tuzen via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly has signed an executive order aimed at improving 911 service and emergency communications across the reservation.

The order calls for collaboration between various tribal departments and private communication providers.

Shelly says no one should have to worry about their call going unanswered.

Tribal officials say the need to improve the existing communications system is evident. According to tribal statistics, 60 percent of homes on the Navajo Nation lack telephone lines and just over half of the reservation has wireless coverage.

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Public Health New Mexico
6:44 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Marchers Honor Homeless Murder Victims, Call For Justice

Credit Ed Williams-KUNM

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People gathered at the Albuquerque Indian Center Friday morning to remember two homeless men who were beaten to death as they slept in a park last week.

Allison Gorman and Kee Thompson were both Native American, and their murders have drawn attention to ongoing violence against Native Americans in New Mexico.

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Local News
5:14 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Navajo Nation To Take Over Gallup Detox Center

A client of Na'Nizhoozhi Center, Inc., better known as NCI, walks to the entrance where he will spend the night.
Credit Donovan Quintero

The largest detoxification center in New Mexico is scheduled to close and reopen under a new name and management: The Navajo Nation.

The Na'Nizhoozhi Center, Inc., served nearly 24,000 people in 2012 and averaged between 75 and 100 intakes per day.

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Poverty and Public Health
5:45 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Navajo Nation Declares Drought Emergency

Plants and dunes on the Navajo Nation.
Credit Margaret Hiza-Redsteer, USGS Flagstaff, AZ / USGS

Navajo President Ben Shelley has declared a state of emergency for drought conditions on the Navajo Nation. Officials are concerned ongoing drought may be creating unsafe conditions for people who need drinkable water.

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Local News
4:01 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

Navajo Nation Explores Future Of Coal

Credit Navajo Nation

The Navajo Nation says the only financially viable future for its coal supply may be in clean coal technologies, and overseas exports.

KUNM's Tristan Ahtone reports the Nation is taking preliminary steps to find a future for its coal resources in light of tough, domestic regulations.

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Poverty and Public Health
6:08 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Navajo Nation Funds Water Projects

With drought affecting much of the southwest, the Navajo Nation is working to bring water to it's citizens with the tribal government recently approving over $8-million dollars for water infrastructure projects.
The Navajo Nation is roughly the size of West Virginia, has a population of around 170,000 people, and much of the Nations citizens are in need of water.

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Local News
4:48 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Fort Wingate Is "Indian Country" Says Court

Credit Navajo Nation

The New Mexico Court of Appeals has allowed the Navajo Nation jurisdiction over the Fort Wingate Indian School just east of Gallup, giving the Nation criminal jurisdiction over tribal members on the Fort Wingate site.

In 1999 a juvenile member of the Navajo Nation was charged with battery at the Fort Wingate High School, and McKinley County attempted to prosecute. The child in question claimed the county had no jurisdiction because Fort Wingate is “Indian Country.” This week, the New Mexico Court of Appeals agreed.

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Poverty and Public Health
5:26 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

Navajo Nation Takes Final Steps To Broadband Access

Credit Navajo Tribal Utility Authority

The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority says it's in the final phases of unveiling high-speed broadband and wireless services for the majority of the Navajo Nation. The project would bring telecommunications services to the nations largest reservation straddling Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico.


A few companies have offered broadband accessibility to parts of the Navajo Nation in the past, however, historically, the Nation has dealt with little to no telecommunications access.

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Local News
4:52 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Future Of Navajo Gaming Compact In Question

A Gaming compact between the Navajo Nation and the State of New Mexico failed to receive a vote by the state legislature before the end of session. With no agreement in place between the Nation and the State, the Navajo gaming industry could now be at risk, as well as nearly a thousand jobs.


The current Navajo Nation Gaming Compact is set to expire in 2015. However, with the states next legislative session focused only on budget matters, tribal officials say there will be no chance for the bill to be heard next year, leading to an expiration of the agreement.

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Local News
4:17 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

Navajo lawmakers reject water rights settlement

Indigenous Action Media

Navajo lawmakers have rejected a settlement that recognizes the tribe's rights to water from the Little Colorado River basin.

The Tribal Council voted 15-6 against the settlement Thursday during a special session in Window Rock.

U.S. Sen. Jon Kyl had introduced legislation to approve the settlement, but it needed the blessing of the Navajo and Hopi tribes to move forward. Kyl has said the settlement would address water needs on the reservations and provide certainty of the water supply for off-reservation communities.

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