Mexican grey wolf

Sally King, National Park Service

KUNM Call In Show 8/18 8a: 


In New Mexico there has always been tension between humans and the wild animals who share our state, so how should we manage that tension? If a bear mauls a marathon runner, should it be shot? How should we deal with coyotes who prey on our pets, wolves that snatch calves or cougars that come just a little too close to the kids? 

All About Wolves

Dec 10, 2015
Creative Commons, Wiki

 Sat. 12/12, 9a:  Wolves used to live all over the United States, but these days we see more of them in zoos than in the forest. We'll find out all about these magestic creatures, including the endangered Mexican Grey Wolf with a zookeeper who cares for them. Plus we'll learn about re-introducing them to the wild, and how the Mexican Grey wolf program is doing. We'll also talk with a wolf rescuer about wolfdogs. Great music, the KUNM Kids Birthday Club, a family events calendar and so much more. 


Wildlife officials have confirmed the first gray wolf in northern Arizona in more than 70 years.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spokesman Jeff Humphrey said Friday that analysis of the animal's scat shows it's from the Northern Rockies population.

The wolf is believed to have traveled at least 450 miles into northern Arizona, where it's been spotted at the Grand Canyon and the adjacent forest.

Wolves often roam vast distances in search of food and mates. Packs from the Northern Rockies had been found as far south as Wyoming.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Environmentalists are accusing federal wildlife managers of keeping secret details about management of a Mexican gray wolf pack in southwestern New Mexico.

The criticism comes after a public records request netted hundreds of pages of blacked-out documents.

The group WildEarth Guardians says nearly 80 percent of the 870 pages released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Services were redacted.