KUNM

IPRA

Mark Woodward

Did Gov. Susana Martinez violate the state’s sunshine law by failing to provide public records to a Santa Fe newspaper? That’s one of two questions at the heart of a lawsuit brought by the Santa Fe Reporter against the governor. We talked about the paper’s discrimination claim in our first story. Here we dig into the lawsuit’s allegations of government secrecy. 

Mark Woodward

Testimony ended today in the three-day trial of SFR v. Gov. Susana Martinez with Mark Zusman, who co-owns the newspaper and two other weeklies, saying all three prioritize the watchdog function of journalism. 

Mark Woodward / with permission

The SFR v. Gov. Susana Martinez trial began today in state District Court with the governor’s high-powered, contract defense lawyer attacking the credibility of the journalists who filed the lawsuit, suggesting they were not precise, not knowledgable, not prepared and not invested in the profession.

Amador Loureiro via Pexels.com / Creative Commons License

President Donald Trump’s administration is sparring with the national news media lately, but those tensions have been growing in New Mexico for quite a while. It’s been over three years since Santa Fe’s alternative weekly newspaper sued Gov. Susana Martinez over press freedom and the public’s right to know. 

Report: NM Ranks Low For Ethics, Accountability

Nov 9, 2015
Emilie Udell for the Center For Public Integrity

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 11/12 8a: 

It’s become habit in New Mexico to groan about incompetence and corruption in state government as though it’s something terrible—but out of our control. Ugh, these politicians. What can you do? 

James Boyd Shooting Footage Missing From IPRA Request

Aug 6, 2014

KUNM has joined up with the online news outlet New Mexico Compass to report on Albuquerque Police officer-involved shootings.

Flood via Flickr / Creative Commons License

People who request audio or video from the Albuquerque Police Department under the state’s Inspection of Public Records Act will no longer have to pay as much for DVDs or CDs.  

New Mexico Foundation for Open Government Executive Director Susan Boe said the City of Albuquerque has implemented a new policy after receiving complaints about high fees from media outlets and individuals.

The City will now charge $6.75 for DVDs and $2.75 for CDs when filling public records requests, or IPRAs.

teofila via Compfight cc

The New Mexico Foundation for Open Government announced today that the City of Albuquerque will charge no more than $6.75 for DVDs and $2.75 for CDs for public records requests. This is a big win for not just journalists but everyone with an interest in accessing records that are available under the law. The change provides fair, consistent rates and lets people know what prices to expect in advance.