KUNM

Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement under President Donald Trump is changing how it effectively prioritizes immigrants for deportation. Immigrant rights advocates in New Mexico say these days, anyone can become a target. That unpredictability is forcing people to make some hard choices. 

my_southborough via Creative Commons

President Trump’s administration this month began publishing a weekly report of local and state law enforcement agencies that have refused to detain people so that federal agents can determine their legal status.

But a federal judge in New Mexico recently approved a settlement that prohibits the San Juan County jail from doing just that - holding inmates past their release date at the request of federal agents.

pixabay.com via CC

Governor Susana Martinez on Friday ordered the state corrections department to work with the federal government on immigration enforcement. President Trump’s Administration requested a list of foreign-born inmates late last month as part of a push to deport people who are in the U.S. illegally.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston / Creative Commons via Flickr

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids in cities across the country are alarming immigrant communities. Hundreds of Albuquerque community members found solace with each other Friday night at a candle-lit St. Paul Lutheran Church.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

After the election, the University of New Mexico’s president issued a message acknowledging that students are feeling unsafe and urging people to respect each other. But hundreds of faculty members, students and even administrators are saying that’s not enough. 

Ed Williams-KUNM

KUNM public health reporter Ed Williams spoke with Santa Fe resident Allegra Love, a former public school teacher who now works as a lawyer for ADELANTE, a Santa Fe Public Schools program that provides help for families experiencing homelessness.

Love is also an immigration attorney. Since this summer she’s been working on asylum cases for refugees held in the federal immigrant detention center in Artesia. 

Ed Williams

 

A city councilor in southeastern New Mexico where 500 Central American immigrants are being detained is set to join a forum on the center's conditions.

Officials say Artesia City Councilor Jose Luis Aguilar is set to participate in a forum Sunday in Albuquerque that will also address how the immigrants are struggling to obtain legal representation.

Leticia Zamarripa, a spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, says since the Artesia detention center opened in June, more than 300 immigrants have been processed and deported from facility.