Immigration

John Hartman via Flickr

New Mexico state representatives voted Thursday to repeal a state law that allows people to get New Mexico driver’s licenses even if they’re in the country illegally.  Some observers see this as a political battle in which winning the war isn’t as important as fighting the battle.

Pointing to several examples of fraud, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez asked state lawmakers again this year to stop allowing immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally to get driver’s licenses here.

Ed Williams

Editor's Note: Due to technical difficulties the entire show was not recorded.     

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 1/8 8a: 

When will President Obama's immigration executive action go into effect? And who will it affect in New Mexico? This week we'll have specifics on the changes, who is eligible and where and how to get help navigating the new rules. 

We'd like to hear from you! Email callinshow@kunm.org, post your comments online or call in live during the show! 

Guests:

Rita Daniels

Immigrant rights advocates gathered in downtown Albuquerque today to express support for President Obama’s executive action on immigration.

UNM student Karina Burciaga told a crowd of about one hundred that the President’s action will affect her personally.

“This victory gives us the energy and the hope to continue to organize," she said, "until all of our families are free from the fear of deportation, the tension and family separation.”

Rita Daniels

A group of university students who have been petitioning for immigration reform gathered to watch President Obama’s televised address as he announced an executive action that will protect nearly 5 million people from being deported. 

The group, mostly made up of students who call themselves the UNM Dream Team, listened intently as President Obama touted that most immigrants are a net plus to the nation's economy and society.

Ed Williams-KUNM

KUNM public health reporter Ed Williams spoke with Santa Fe resident Allegra Love, a former public school teacher who now works as a lawyer for ADELANTE, a Santa Fe Public Schools program that provides help for families experiencing homelessness.

Love is also an immigration attorney. Since this summer she’s been working on asylum cases for refugees held in the federal immigrant detention center in Artesia. 

World Bank Photo Collection via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 10/23 8a: What public health issues are New Mexico candidates talking about in their campaigns? What are politicians and elected officials not talking about? We'll have an in depth discussion with KUNM's Public Health New Mexico reporting team - Ed Williams and Marisa Demarco.

Post your comments below and check out the project site publichealthnm.org

Ed Williams

 

A city councilor in southeastern New Mexico where 500 Central American immigrants are being detained is set to join a forum on the center's conditions.

Officials say Artesia City Councilor Jose Luis Aguilar is set to participate in a forum Sunday in Albuquerque that will also address how the immigrants are struggling to obtain legal representation.

Leticia Zamarripa, a spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, says since the Artesia detention center opened in June, more than 300 immigrants have been processed and deported from facility.

Ed Williams-KUNM

As Immigration lawyers prepare to battle the federal government over possible due process violations against immigrant women and children detained in Artesia, records obtained by KUNM raise another legal question about the facility—whether the detention center is in compliance with state child welfare laws.

Steev Hise via Flickr

Some New Mexico immigration lawyers are speaking out in opposition to the Obama administration’s proposal to expedite deportation proceedings for Central American women and children, some of whom are being detained in Artesia in southern New Mexico.  

Derek Bruff via flickr

Members of a legal working group who visited the federal immigrant detention center in Artesia  say some of the women and young children housed there are reporting a lack of access to medical care and legal counsel. Tannia Esparza, executive director of the advocacy group Young Women United, was a member of the group that visited the detention facility.

“At first glance the facility seems to be in working order,” Esparza said. “But the women told us the conditions are not adequate.”

Donna Burton / U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

President Obama and Congress are struggling to make progress on immigration reform as a surge of children are arriving at the U.S. border, many on their own, after long journeys from Central America.

This week we'll tackle a discussion of the economic and political causes of this mass migration—and the impacts on New Mexico communities seeing an influx of migrants.

We'd like to hear from you! Email callinshow@kunm.org, post your comments online or via Twitter @KUNMNews, or call in live during the show. 

Host: Gwyneth Doland

Guests: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qYGYgRfmbQ / U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich

Senator Martin Heinrich discussed the Central American migrant crisis along the U.S./Mexico border Wednesday on the Senate floor in Washington, D.C.

"We have a human crisis at our southern border that requires immediate but compassionate response," the New Mexico Democrat said. He called on his Republican colleagues in the Senate to work with President Obama to deal with the crisis and demand that House Republicans bring the Senate’s immigration bill to the House floor for debate.

EJP Photo via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The Los Angeles Times told the story in 2002 of Enrique, a 17-year-old boy from Honduras who made the treacherous trip across Mexico to reach his mother in the United States.

What inspired me most in the Pulitzer Prize-winning series Enrique’s Journey was the teen’s tenacity in the face of life-threatening danger.

Natalia Jacquez

Maria Cabrera owed $57,000 dollars after she suffered a heart attack and ended up in an Albuquerque hospital.

“Once I was out of the hospital, I got completely in debt,” Cabrera said. “The debt was so large that I don’t even know what’s going on.”

A large amount of that debt was cut down through financial assistance, but she says the debt collectors are still calling, and she’s unclear of just how much she owes. 

"I'll make clear we have no intention ever of going to conference on the Senate bill." - John Boehner, Speaker of the House

Photo via www.wordstrike.net

Ever since Arizona's controversial S-B-10-70 became law last year, other states and cities have tried to follow its example. But as Ruxandra Guidi reports for the Fronteras Changing America Desk, few cities have defied both state and federal immigration laws like the city of Escondido, California.

Photo via www.kcet.org

The congressional Super-Committee has failed to settle on a bipartisan proposal to cut the nation's deficit by 1.5 trillion dollars. But as Ruxandra Guidi reports for the Fronteras Changing America Desk, some advocates for immigration reform have been calling for cuts to border enforcement.

Photo via www.rottentalk.wordpress.com

More than a hundred janitors and their supporters sought briefly to occupy the plaza in front of the federal building in downtown San Diego on Thursday.  Jill Replogle reports from the Fronteras Changing America Desk.

 

Photo via www.nerdygeeks.net

A new bipartisan study examines the latest Census data and finds that immigrants to the U.S., especially young immigrants, are assimilating well. Ruxandra Guidi reports from the Fronteras Changing America Desk.

Photo Courtesy of Creative Commons by Narith5

A new report on this year's record number of deportations finds a growing number of children of deported immigrants are ending up in foster care in the U.S.  From the Fronteras Changing America Desk, Ruxandra Guidi has our story.

Photo by Octavian Cosma via www.flickr.com

The U.S. Border Patrol for decades has conducted immigration checks in transportation centers like bus stations and airports. But as Hernán Rozemberg from the Fronteras Changing America Desk reports, the agency is now quietly rolling back the program.

Photo courtesy of Creative Commons by cliff1066™

The Department of Homeland Security is under scrutiny in Congress over recent changes to immigration enforcement, including deportations. From our Fronteras Changing America Desk, Ruxandra Guidi has our story.

Photo via www.flickr.com by Brian Romig

Undocumented immigrant convicts in Texas prisons are applying for parole so they can be deported home under a new state law.  Fronteras Changing America Desk correspondent Hernán Rozemberg reports.

 

 

Photo by Nunodantas via www.flickr.com

Over the weekend, California Governor Jerry Brown signed two bills important to undocumented immigrants. The bills are also expected to impact the state's economy. From our Fronteras Changing America Desk, Ruxandra Guidi has our story.

Photo via www.tanstaaflcanada.blogspot.com

The Supreme Court has ruled against a Southern Arizona rancher who once held a group of illegal immigrants at gunpoint. As Michel Marizco reports for the Fronteras Changing America Desk, the Court says the rancher must pay 87-thousand dollars. 

 

The Tijuana-San Diego area was for decades one of the busiest human smuggling crossings along the southwest border. In the nineties, more than fifteen-hundred people were smuggled through there each week. But rising violence and increased border security have drastically changed the illegal business. As Ruxandra Guidi reports from the Fronteras Changing America Desk, it's also changed the role of those who look to help immigrants on both sides of the border.

Photo via www.wn.com

The investigative arm of Congress has released a report saying that the United States military's efforts on the Mexican border have not been managed efficiently. Fronteras Changing America Desk correspondent Michel Marizco reports that's despite the millions of dollars spent.

Photo via www.futurity.org

The Homeland Security Department will roll out a new system to track down people who overstay their temporary legal visas. Fronteras Changing America Desk correspondent Hernán Rozemberg explains it's been a decade in the making.