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Hillary Clinton

Marisa Demarco/KUNM

At the Democratic headquarters last night in Albuquerque, the final election results rolled in and Hillary Clinton’s victory failed to materialize.

Gage Skidmore via Flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

Hillary Clinton won New Mexico's presidential contest to gain five electoral votes.

Voters on Tuesday chose the Democrat over Republican Donald Trump and the state's former governor, Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson.

Clinton prevailed after she and running mate Tim Kaine skipped campaigning in New Mexico and relied on visits from Bill Clinton and a post-primary rally by Bernie Sanders. Registered Democrats far outnumber Republicans in the heavily Hispanic state where Barack Obama won his elections handily.

Updated 10:28 a.m. ET

On Tuesday night, as the presidential election's outcome headed toward an unexpected Trump victory, stock futures plunged. Investors had bet heavily Monday on Democrat Hillary Clinton. As Republican Donald Trump picked up many more votes than polls had predicted, markets reacted violently to the change in expectations.

It was Nov. 4, 2008. My birthday. Election Day. I made my way uptown to Harlem, where my friend Rakia was going to be watching the election returns with friends. I almost never wanted to go uptown — from Brooklyn, it may as well have been a trip to Guam — but that night I felt that I really, really needed to be in Harlem.

The cemetery where women's suffrage activist Susan B. Anthony is buried extended its hours Tuesday "to accommodate those wishing to celebrate their vote" at her gravesite.

Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, N.Y., will be open until polls there close at 9 p.m. ET.

Although this presidential election is the first in American history to have a woman on the ballot as a major party candidate, it is not the first time people have commemorated their votes by visiting Anthony's grave.

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Polls are not the only place people look to for guidance to Election Day outcomes. Lots of people believe in bellwethers.

The first two things to know about bellwethers is that there's no letter "a" in the word, and bellwethers don't have anything to do with predicting the weather. The name refers to the neutered rams that shepherds use to guide flocks in the right direction. The wether trots along when the shepherd calls, the bell at his neck jangles, and the other sheep come ambling after him.

Aside from the cliches that it all comes down to turnout and that the only poll that counts is the one on Election Day, one more truism that talking heads will repeat endlessly Tuesday is that demographics are destiny.

It may make you want to throw a shoe at the TV (or radio), but (as they say) cliches are cliches for a reason. Breaking the electorate into these smaller chunks tells a lot about what people like and dislike about a candidate, not to mention how a rapidly changing electorate is changing the fundamentals of U.S. presidential politics.

Hillary Clinton's path relies on winning traditionally Democratic states and has several potential ways over the top. Donald Trump has a much narrower path — he has to run the table in toss-up states and break through in a state that currently leans toward Clinton.

Here are seven ways Election Day could play out:

I've noticed two distinct ways social media have changed the way we talk to each other about politics. Clearly, they have changed a lot, maybe everything, but two fairly new phenomena stand out.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Candidates in this year’s presidential election have been tight-lipped about the fight against an oil pipeline in North Dakota and how demonstrators there are being treated by police. That’s weighing on Sharon Chavez, who is Navajo and Hopi-Tewa. She’s a retired educator who’s lived in San Felipe Pueblo for 47 years. She talked with KUNM about what it means for her as a woman to vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton for president.

Courtesy of Yesenia Luna

Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump has escalated the national battle over immigration and race in America with his views on Mexican immigrants and building a wall for border security. KUNM talked to Yesenia Luna, a pre-law student at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, about how the national rhetoric affected her ballot.

Ed Williams

Sexual assault, gender equality and women’s reproductive rights have taken center stage this election season, with controversial comments by Donald Trump galvanizing some voters’ support for Hillary Clinton.

KUNM met with one of those voters at a restaurant in Santa Fe to find out why she’s supporting the Democratic presidential ticket.

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

New Mexico’s struggled to recover fully from the recession, and it can still be a real challenge to find steady work in the state. That’s central to how 18-year-old Quinton Valencia is casting his vote this year. KUNM tagged along with Valencia as he applied for a job at Target in Rio Rancho.

Neither major party presidential candidate has made public education a central theme of their campaign in this year’s election. Still, some voters in New Mexico see education as one of the most important issues in our country.

One of those voters is John Sena, a teacher at Española Valley High School. 

Meg Kelly/NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. 

Lib.unm.edu / Creative Commons

KUNM Call In Show 10/13 8a: The 2016 presidential election has been polarizing. Many of the biggest divides are over class, gender and race. We'll talk about how this election is highlighting voter attitudes on these important topics.

Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton debated Sunday night in their second official matchup.

It was the first debate since audio surfaced of Trump making vulgar comments about women, causing more than two dozen in GOP leadership to defect from the candidate.

Anna Lande / KUNM

Former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson was in Albuquerque Saturday to rally supporters for his presidential bid as the Libertarian candidate. Gary Johnson needs to reach 15 percent in some national polls to be included in presidential debates alongside Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump. KUNM's Anna Lande was there to find out why people are thinking of voting for Johnson.

New Mexico PBS

KUNM teamed up with New Mexico PBS for a New Mexico primary election special featuring results and analysis from political observers and reporters. Gene Grant of New Mexico in Focus and Ed Williams of the KUNM Public Health New Mexico project hosted the conversation. 

Victoria Edwards / KUNM

Voters are going to the polls today to vote in New Mexico’s primary election.

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons via Flickr

New Mexico's primary election day is this Tuesday, June 7, 2016. Are you ready? 

Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com / Creative Commons License

  March 19, 2016: Survey shows equal pay women's top concern in election; First all=female crew on Royal Brunei Airlines flies to Saudi Arabia; Chicago bans tampon sales tax; Microsoft regrets using dancers in erotic schoolgirl outfits at gaming conference; Nigerian lawmakers vote down women's equality bill; Jezebel examines wage disparities on presidential campaign staffs; Report estimates 100,000 women have attempted self-terminations after law shutters numerous abortion clinics; UN panel on women's economic empowerment launches; Irish politicians promise to revoke article in constitution

Wikipedia / Creative Commons License

  February 13, 2016: Report finds 200 million in 30 countries have undergone female genital mutilation; Yazidi women freed form sexual slavery join Peshmerga forces to liberate Mosul; Carly Fiorina drops out of presidential race; Hillary Clinton debates Bernie Sanders and older feminists criticize young women for supporting Sanders; Fairy Godboss offers anonymous rankings on companies' family friendly policies; two women U.S.

(Note: Tonight's debate, moderated by PBS NewsHour anchors Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, will be simulcast on CNN and NPR and streamed live on NPR.org. NPR's Tamara Keith will be part of the debate broadcast, providing analysis during and after the event.)

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton meet Thursday night on a debate stage in Milwaukee. It's their first face-to-face matchup since Tuesday's New Hampshire primary where Sanders beat Clinton by more than 20 points.

Sudan releases woman slated for stoning, Hillary Clinton pushes for reproductive rights at UN conference, study finds links between IVF and cancer, Michigan female lawmakers protest with Vagina Monologues