KUNM

farming

Melorie Begay

For some people, eating and planting fresh food is about more than just filling empty stomachs, it’s a way to find connection and build community. It can get expensive, but some organizers in Southeast Albuquerque are committed to making fresh local organic food available.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

It’s summer, and that means many teenagers are headed to jobs, internships, volunteering – places where they meet adults besides their parents and teachers. The interactions can turn into mentorships that enrich the lives of the teens and the adults. This kind of synergy is thriving at a special plot of land in Albuquerque’s South Valley.

LISTEN: Cultivating Health With Community Farms

Apr 29, 2016
Ed Williams

KUNM Call In Show 5/5 8 a: New Mexico has one of the oldest and most vibrant farming traditions in the country. Centuries-old acequia watering systems and ancient farming techniques are still used to grow crops that feed people from Taos to Las Cruces. 

EPA: River Is Bouncing Back

Aug 12, 2015
Clyde Frogg via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons License

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency has ordered agency offices nationwide to stop field investigation work for mine cleanups while they reassess the work to ensure there's no potential for spills similar to the one in Colorado.

Harvesting Health In The South Valley

May 6, 2015
Ed Williams

    

Santiago Maestas has been growing fruits and vegetables on a small plot of land in the South Valley for over 40 years. He's standing by a centuries-old acequia near Isleta Boulevard south of Albuquerque—a modest, earthen ditch carrying slow-moving irrigation water away from the Rio Grande and into fields and gardens.

Program Supports Young Farmers

May 6, 2015
Rita Daniels

There is a growing demand for locally grown food in New Mexico, but farmers here are getting older. The average age is 65. However, there are programs that aim to inspire and train up-and-coming young farmers.

Keepseagle Claims Case

Oct 24, 2011
Bureau of Indian Affairs

10/24 at 11 am:  The clock is ticking for Native American farmers and ranchers in the historic Keepseagle claims case. The period to file a claim in the Keepseagle class action settlement is two months away. The Keepseagle case was won by Native Americans, who claimed  that the U.S. Department of Agriculture discriminated against them.