KUNM

Election 2016

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The day after Donald Trump is inaugurated as the United States’ 45th president, hundreds of thousands of people are expected to flood in from around the country to march through the nation’s capital. The mission of the Women’s March includes advocating for human rights and pushing back against bigotry toward immigrants, Muslims and people of color. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Protests have been erupting in cities around the United States in the days since Donald Trump was elected president. Hundreds of students at the University of New Mexico staged a walkout Wednesday evening.  

During this year’s campaign cycle, voters learned of sexual assault allegations against Republican Donald Trump and heard a years-old recording of him bragging about assaulting women.  KUNM sat down with Jim Harvey, the new executive director at the Rape Crisis Center of Central New Mexico, to talk about how Trump’s election impacts their work. 

Marisa Demarco/KUNM

U.S. Representative Michelle Lujan Grisham won a decisive victory last night, but she’s got a hard road ahead of her as a Democrat in the Republican-controlled Congress. 

Marisa Demarco/KUNM

At the Democratic headquarters last night in Albuquerque, the final election results rolled in and Hillary Clinton’s victory failed to materialize.

Ed Williams/KUNM

New Mexico Republicans lost control of the state House of Representatives but they did manage to unseat a power Democrat in the state Senate.   

Democratic Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez lost his seat to his Republican opponent Greg Baca Tuesday who beat him 55 to 45 percent of votes.

Baca said he didn’t have any specific policies to bring to the Round House. But speaking at the GOP election watch party Tuesday night, he said he’ll push issues of safety and job growth when the legislative session begins in January.

Republican Hangs On To House Seat

Nov 9, 2016
Sarah Maestas Barnes

Democrats took back control of the New Mexico House of Representatives in Tuesday election. But some Republican representatives were able to hold on to their seats.

Sarah Maestas Barnes of northeast Albuquerque was one of a handful of state representatives who withstood Democrats’ efforts.

The national elections have been especially polarizing, but Maestas Barnes said Republicans and Democrats in New Mexico are going to have to avoid the sharp partisanship that dominated the national elections.

New Mexico In Focus (screenshot)

Local Democratic victories were overshadowed by bleak numbers dribbling in for presidential candidate Hillary Clinton last night at an event in Albuquerque. But Democrats regained control of New Mexico’s House of Representatives.

Gage Skidmore via Flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

Hillary Clinton won New Mexico's presidential contest to gain five electoral votes.

Voters on Tuesday chose the Democrat over Republican Donald Trump and the state's former governor, Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson.

Clinton prevailed after she and running mate Tim Kaine skipped campaigning in New Mexico and relied on visits from Bill Clinton and a post-primary rally by Bernie Sanders. Registered Democrats far outnumber Republicans in the heavily Hispanic state where Barack Obama won his elections handily.

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Voters Approve Bail Bond Constitutional Amendment - The Associated Press

New Mexico voters have approved a constitutional amendment that will allow judges to deny bail to defendants considered exceptionally dangerous.

The amendment also grants pretrial release to those who aren't considered a threat but remain in jail because they can't afford bail.

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Democrats Win Majority In New Mexico House – The Associated Press

The Democratic Party has won a majority of seats in the New Mexico House of Representatives, taking back control of the chamber from the GOP.

Republicans will hold on to control of the Senate, according to Associated Press projections. The GOP defied the odds in a year in which it was almost entirely on defense and rode a wave that carried Donald J. Trump to the White House.

Even with their best opportunities to gain seats in years, Democrats so far have only been able to pick up deep blue Illinois. And they narrowly hung on in Nevada, which was Republicans' only offensive opportunity.

Updated 10:28 a.m. ET

On Tuesday night, as the presidential election's outcome headed toward an unexpected Trump victory, stock futures plunged. Investors had bet heavily Monday on Democrat Hillary Clinton. As Republican Donald Trump picked up many more votes than polls had predicted, markets reacted violently to the change in expectations.

Polls are not the only place people look to for guidance to Election Day outcomes. Lots of people believe in bellwethers.

The first two things to know about bellwethers is that there's no letter "a" in the word, and bellwethers don't have anything to do with predicting the weather. The name refers to the neutered rams that shepherds use to guide flocks in the right direction. The wether trots along when the shepherd calls, the bell at his neck jangles, and the other sheep come ambling after him.

Aside from the cliches that it all comes down to turnout and that the only poll that counts is the one on Election Day, one more truism that talking heads will repeat endlessly Tuesday is that demographics are destiny.

It may make you want to throw a shoe at the TV (or radio), but (as they say) cliches are cliches for a reason. Breaking the electorate into these smaller chunks tells a lot about what people like and dislike about a candidate, not to mention how a rapidly changing electorate is changing the fundamentals of U.S. presidential politics.

Hillary Clinton's path relies on winning traditionally Democratic states and has several potential ways over the top. Donald Trump has a much narrower path — he has to run the table in toss-up states and break through in a state that currently leans toward Clinton.

Here are seven ways Election Day could play out:

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Anxiety about voter intimidation has laced the final weeks of a tense election cycle around the country. But one nonpartisan organization in New Mexico is ready to help. 

Ed Williams / KUNM

Tune in to KUNM starting at 6 p.m. on Tuesday for live special election night coverage from NPR News. We'll feature speeches, newsmaker interviews, reports from candidates and polling sites, and analysis from NPR’s Politics Team.

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KUNM Call In Show 11/10 8a: Call toll-free 1-877-899-5866. What happens now that the 2016 election is over? We'll talk to political observers all over New Mexico. Did money spent by candidates translate into votes? Will local power structures shift and how? What local ballot questions passed or failed? We want to hear from you, too. How was your experience voting? How will the outcome of the election impact you and your community? Email callinshow@kunm.org or call in live during the show!

Courtesy of Yesenia Luna

Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump has escalated the national battle over immigration and race in America with his views on Mexican immigrants and building a wall for border security. KUNM talked to Yesenia Luna, a pre-law student at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, about how the national rhetoric affected her ballot.

Sat 11/5 9a: On the Children’s Hour this Saturday starting at 9am, we’ll explore Presidential campaign songs through American history. And, we’ll talk about living well with autism. It’s all in an hour: The Children’s Hour, every Saturday from 9 to 10am.

New Mexico in Focus

Bernalillo County Clerk Democrat Maggie Toulouse Oliver is running become New Mexico’s next Secretary of State.

Oliver sat down for a conversation with Gwyneth Doland, as part of KUNM’s special election overage with New Mexico PBS.  Her Republican opponent, state lawmaker Nora Espinoza declined multiple interview requests.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Mountainair is a small town in New Mexico about an hour and a half southeast of Albuquerque. It’s got one streetlight and one gas station. Pastor Darrell Roberts says he likes living out in the open where people look at things from a humble perspective and live a simpler—if usually less affluent—lifestyle.

As part of our Voices Behind The Vote series, KUNM talked with Pastor Roberts about what matters to him as Election Day comes down the tracks.

Ed Williams

Sexual assault, gender equality and women’s reproductive rights have taken center stage this election season, with controversial comments by Donald Trump galvanizing some voters’ support for Hillary Clinton.

KUNM met with one of those voters at a restaurant in Santa Fe to find out why she’s supporting the Democratic presidential ticket.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

If you live in a rural part of New Mexico where your nearest neighbor is miles away, it could be tempting to just tune out this year’s election. But David Doler says he can’t ignore things like Social Security, Medicare or any talk of infringing on a person’s right to keep and bear arms.

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KUNM Call In Show 11/3 8a: Are you worried that the election is rigged? Or that voters might be intimidated at the polls on Election Day? We'll look at local and statewide races, get an update on early voter turnout and talk about voters' rights at the polls. We'd like to hear from you, email callinshow@kunm.org or call in live during the show.

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

New Mexico’s struggled to recover fully from the recession, and it can still be a real challenge to find steady work in the state. That’s central to how 18-year-old Quinton Valencia is casting his vote this year. KUNM tagged along with Valencia as he applied for a job at Target in Rio Rancho.

Ed Williams

Voters in Bernalillo County are gearing up to elect a new commissioner in next week’s general election.

Republican Patricia Paiz is squaring off against Democrat Steven Michael Quezada to take over as commissioner for District 2—an area that includes the South Valley and West Mesa.

The race could shape the county’s policies on industrial pollution and community health.

New Mexico in Focus

U.S. Representative Democrat Michelle Lujan Grisham is running for re-election this year in New Mexico’s first district. She sat down with Gwyneth Doland to discuss critical issues for voters as part of KUNM’s special election coverage with New Mexico PBS.

Her Republican challenger Richard Priem did not respond to multiple interview requests from New Mexico PBS. 

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Voters this year will decide whether to amend the state Constitution and change the way New Mexico’s bail bond system works.

Jeff Proctor is an independent journalist who has been following the issue for The Justice Project, published by New Mexico In Depth. He spoke with KUNM’s Elaine Baumgartel.

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