early childhood education

Reading To Dogs

Mar 1, 2018
Wiki, Creative Commons

The Children's Hour, Sat 3/3 9a: The studio is going to the dogs with our friends from Albuquerque Bernalillo County Library’s Read to The Dogs program. It’s going to be a dog party!

U.S. Embassy in the Philippines via CC

Funding for public early childhood programs is tight around New Mexico, and it’s disproportionately students of color who miss out. Allen Sanchez of the New Mexico Conference of Catholic Bishops sparked debate last week when he told an Associated Press reporter that systemic racism is a factor in why legislation that could have fixed the problem didn’t get a fair shake. 

Night Owl City via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Supporters of early childhood education didn’t get the funding they were hoping for this legislative session.

Some House lawmakers wanted to use more money from the State’s Land Grant Permanent Fund for things like pre-K, childcare cssistance and other programs. But Democratic State Senator John Arthur Smith said that’s a bad idea.

Let's Talk Education And The State Budget

Feb 7, 2018
Night Owl City via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Let's Talk New Mexico 2/8 8a: Call now (505) 277-5866. Most New Mexico lawmakers might agree that improving education for our children is a top priority. But in a year when the state’s oil and gas revenues are up, there’s no consensus on just how much money schools need, where that money should come from or how it should be spent. How could our laws and state spending better serve students? This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’re talking education and the state budget. Join us Thursday morning at 8 on KUNM. Call in live during the show or tweet using #LetsTalkNM.

FeeLoona via Pixabay / creative commons license

New Mexico’s poverty rate is getting even worse for children under five years old, according to new numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Now some child advocates and state legislators are renewing their calls to use money from the state’s permanent fund to pay for childhood programs. 

Pixabay via Creative Commons

Lawmakers and educators in New Mexico have been talking about the achievement gap in public schools for years—and trying to figure out how to close it. Testimony in a landmark education trial underway in Santa Fe touched on early childhood education programs this week. The lawsuit says they’re crucial to making sure students of color, children from families with low incomes and English language-learners succeed. But those programs aren’t widely available. 

How To Pay For Early Childhood Education?

Feb 1, 2016
Emory Maiden via Flickr

Lawmakers considered proposals Monday that would use a small share of the state’s Land Grant Permanent Fund to pay for early childhood education, and the measures ran into familiar roadblocks.

For the past five years, some democratic lawmakers have tried to tap into the state’s $14 billion Land Grant Permanent Fund to pay for early childhood education programs.

Gina McCaleb via Flickr

This week President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act into law, replacing the controversial No Child Left Behind Act. The new law gets rid of many of the standardized testing requirements that had been in place under No Child Left Behind, and gives states more leeway in designing their own education standards.

Public Health New Mexico spoke to U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich, who supported the bill, about what the changes mean for our state.

Kids, Parents To March For Early Childhood Education

Feb 12, 2015
Donker Dink via Flickr


A ton of little kids and their parents will take to the steps of the Roundhouse on Friday. The 1000 Kid March is calling for lawmakers to fully fund early childhood education.

It would cost nearly $400 million a year to pay for things like childcare and preschool for all eligible low-income families in New Mexico. The state spends just a fraction of that now.

VickyTH via Flickr / Creative Commons License

New Mexico is one of the worst states in the nation when it comes to measurements of child wellbeing–49th according to the Kids Count Report.

Thursday at 7p on New Mexico PBS, a panel explores early childhood education as a possible solution. It's this month's episode of Public Square, a monthly public affairs program where civic dialogue takes center stage.

Ajnagraphy via compfight / Creative Commons License

Thursday at 8p New Mexico PBS premieres the fourth season of Public Square, a monthly public affairs program where civic dialogue takes center stage.

Tune in tonight for the full discussion. The panel takes up the question of how to improve child well-being in New Mexico. We are 49th in the nation, according to the annual Kids Count Report.