KUNM

Donald Trump

Wikimedia Commons via CC

President Trump eliminated protections for transgender students that allow them to use the bathroom of their choice on Wednesday. In New Mexico’s largest school district, those rights are preserved. 

Israeli Defense Forces via CC 3.0

President Trump is the latest in a succession of U.S. presidents pledging unbreakable support for Israel. Last year, for instance, the US signed a $38 billion military aid package with the Israelis even as Washington pressed Israel to make peace with the Palestinians. As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump signaled an intent to bolster Israel in even more demonstrative ways. But lately, in the early days of the Trump administration, the language of support has become somewhat less robust. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

People around the nation packed major airports this past weekend denouncing President Trump’s executive order barring refugees and—temporarily—immigrants from seven largely Muslim countries. The same was true in New Mexico. A huge and diverse group of demonstrators descended on the Sunport on Sunday.   

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Extremist opinion writer Milo Yiannopoulos delivered a speech at New Mexico’s flagship university in Albuquerque on Friday just hours after President Trump issued an executive order on immigration and refugees. Yiannopoulos champions free speech, but several dissenters were escorted from his event by police.   

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Thousands of protesters gathered at airports across the country Saturday to denounce President Trump's recent executive order that barred citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, from entering the U.S. for 90 days. The order also temporarily suspended entry to all refugees for 120 days.

Updated 2 p.m. ET

President Trump's freeze on immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries cites the potential threat of terrorism. But here's the twist — it doesn't include any countries from which radicalized Muslims have actually killed Americans in the U.S. since Sept. 11, 2001.

The president's executive action, which he signed Friday at the Pentagon, applies to these countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq and Sudan.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

President Donald Trump signed an executive action on Tuesday approving the Dakota Access Pipeline, which water protectors have been working to stop for months. In Albuquerque on Wednesday, people gathered outside the tall Wells Fargo bank Downtown to try and stanch the flow of money to the project known as DAPL. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

As more than half a million people turned up to the Women’s March in D.C., here at home, demonstrators gathered around the state. In Albuquerque, hail and wind did not deter thousands from streaming into Civic Plaza Downtown, in what has to be one of the biggest women’s rights-centric events ever in New Mexico. The message was inclusive of civil rights, protections for immigrants, health care and more. The massive crowd was jubilant. 

Marisa Demarco/KUNM

In Downtown Albuquerque, street lights reflected off wet asphalt as a couple hundred nonviolent demonstrators called for political revolution. Their ranks swelled, and at first, there wasn’t a police officer in sight.

publicdomainpictures.net via CC

The day after Donald Trump is inaugurated as the United States’ 45th president, hundreds of thousands of people are expected to flood in from around the country to march through the nation’s capital. The mission of the Women’s March includes advocating for human rights and pushing back against bigotry toward immigrants, Muslims and people of color. 

Elaine Baumgartel / KUNM

Donald Trump will be sworn in as president Friday, and some New Mexicans are mobilizing in response. Protests and celebrations are planned at university campuses, local landmarks, and downtown areas. 

SETH WENIG / AP

Originally published on January 11, 2017 2:11 pm

For the first time in 167 days, President-elect Donald Trump held a wide-ranging news conference.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors across the newsroom, live-annotated the speech. Portions of the transcript with added analysis are underlined in yellow, followed by context and fact checks below.

Note: The transcript was updated throughout the press conference. While we are working to correct errors, it may contain discrepancies and typographical errors.

Fibonacci Blue via Flickr CC

President-Elect Donald Trump is still talking building of a border wall and spurring speculation about deportations around the United States. Local civil rights groups are uniting to march for immigrant rights this weekend. 

New Mexico In Focus (screenshot)

Democrats regained control of New Mexico’s House of Representatives during the election. They met over the weekend, and former minority leader Brian Egolf of Santa Fe was nominated to be the next House Speaker.  

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Protests have been erupting in cities around the United States in the days since Donald Trump was elected president. Hundreds of students at the University of New Mexico staged a walkout Wednesday evening.  

During this year’s campaign cycle, voters learned of sexual assault allegations against Republican Donald Trump and heard a years-old recording of him bragging about assaulting women.  KUNM sat down with Jim Harvey, the new executive director at the Rape Crisis Center of Central New Mexico, to talk about how Trump’s election impacts their work. 

Updated 10:28 a.m. ET

On Tuesday night, as the presidential election's outcome headed toward an unexpected Trump victory, stock futures plunged. Investors had bet heavily Monday on Democrat Hillary Clinton. As Republican Donald Trump picked up many more votes than polls had predicted, markets reacted violently to the change in expectations.

It was Nov. 4, 2008. My birthday. Election Day. I made my way uptown to Harlem, where my friend Rakia was going to be watching the election returns with friends. I almost never wanted to go uptown — from Brooklyn, it may as well have been a trip to Guam — but that night I felt that I really, really needed to be in Harlem.

The cemetery where women's suffrage activist Susan B. Anthony is buried extended its hours Tuesday "to accommodate those wishing to celebrate their vote" at her gravesite.

Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, N.Y., will be open until polls there close at 9 p.m. ET.

Although this presidential election is the first in American history to have a woman on the ballot as a major party candidate, it is not the first time people have commemorated their votes by visiting Anthony's grave.

Loading...

Polls are not the only place people look to for guidance to Election Day outcomes. Lots of people believe in bellwethers.

The first two things to know about bellwethers is that there's no letter "a" in the word, and bellwethers don't have anything to do with predicting the weather. The name refers to the neutered rams that shepherds use to guide flocks in the right direction. The wether trots along when the shepherd calls, the bell at his neck jangles, and the other sheep come ambling after him.

Aside from the cliches that it all comes down to turnout and that the only poll that counts is the one on Election Day, one more truism that talking heads will repeat endlessly Tuesday is that demographics are destiny.

It may make you want to throw a shoe at the TV (or radio), but (as they say) cliches are cliches for a reason. Breaking the electorate into these smaller chunks tells a lot about what people like and dislike about a candidate, not to mention how a rapidly changing electorate is changing the fundamentals of U.S. presidential politics.

Hillary Clinton's path relies on winning traditionally Democratic states and has several potential ways over the top. Donald Trump has a much narrower path — he has to run the table in toss-up states and break through in a state that currently leans toward Clinton.

Here are seven ways Election Day could play out:

I've noticed two distinct ways social media have changed the way we talk to each other about politics. Clearly, they have changed a lot, maybe everything, but two fairly new phenomena stand out.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Mountainair is a small town in New Mexico about an hour and a half southeast of Albuquerque. It’s got one streetlight and one gas station. Pastor Darrell Roberts says he likes living out in the open where people look at things from a humble perspective and live a simpler—if usually less affluent—lifestyle.

As part of our Voices Behind The Vote series, KUNM talked with Pastor Roberts about what matters to him as Election Day comes down the tracks.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

If you live in a rural part of New Mexico where your nearest neighbor is miles away, it could be tempting to just tune out this year’s election. But David Doler says he can’t ignore things like Social Security, Medicare or any talk of infringing on a person’s right to keep and bear arms.

Sarah Trujillo

Several thousand supporters showed up at Donald Trump’s last-minute campaign stop on Sunday night in Albuquerque. KUNM chatted with them as they waited in line at the private hangar near the city's airport.

Meg Kelly/NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. 

Lib.unm.edu / Creative Commons

KUNM Call In Show 10/13 8a: The 2016 presidential election has been polarizing. Many of the biggest divides are over class, gender and race. We'll talk about how this election is highlighting voter attitudes on these important topics.

Pages