KUNM

Dakota Access Pipeline

The Encampment

Mar 23, 2017
Ann Arbor Miller/Minnesota Public Radio News / used with permission

The Encampment Friday 3/24 8a: For almost a year, hundreds of people continuously occupied a strip of land along the Missouri River in North Dakota, in the hope that the mere fact of their presence would help change the course of America’s energy future. 

Courtesy Mayahuel Garza

A judge ruled Monday, Feb. 13, against temporarily halting the oil pipeline in North Dakota, though court battles are ongoing, and people there continue to protest. Mayahuel Garza from Los Lunas, N.M., has made many trips to North Dakota to stand with the water protectors, deliver supplies and offer traditional Aztec ceremony and dance. She spoke with KUNM late last week about her reaction to the news that the Army Corps of Engineers was clearing the way for construction of the pipeline to begin. 

The Army Corps of Engineers gave the OK for a much contested pipeline under the Missouri River in North Dakota. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe intends to keep fighting the construction in court. Indigenous leaders, activists and veterans gathered in New Mexico on Thursday.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

President Donald Trump signed an executive action on Tuesday approving the Dakota Access Pipeline, which water protectors have been working to stop for months. In Albuquerque on Wednesday, people gathered outside the tall Wells Fargo bank Downtown to try and stanch the flow of money to the project known as DAPL. 

Ed Williams

 

KUNM Call In Show 12/8 8a: The protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline and the violent backlash by law enforcement have galvanized many American Indian activists. Thousands have joined the effort, arguing the pipeline would threaten the water supply and destroy Native American ancestral lands. Many celebrated an announcement by the Army Corps of Engineers this week that it would deny a permit for construction on a key part of the pipeline. But it's not clear what will happen regarding the project under the Trump Administration.

How will this impact energy development on tribal lands and sacred places in New Mexico?

Ed Williams/KUNM

Demonstrators are preparing for winter at their camp in North Dakota, aiming to stop a pipeline that would carry crude oil under the Missouri River from being built. Protesters marched in solidarity Albuquerque on Tuesday, Nov. 15, as part of a national day of action against the pipeline.

Many Reasons, One Cause In Pipeline Protest

Sep 14, 2016
Amy Sisk / Inside Energy

Opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline continues to grow beyond its North Dakota roots, with solidarity protests Tuesday in dozens of cities across the country and the world.

Joe Catron via Flickr / Creative Commons License

UNM’s Kiva Club, a Native American issues student club, and a Native American Studies class are holding a demonstration Thursday to show solidarity with tribes from across the country that are protesting the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline in North Dakota.