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Congress is considering legislation that will make it easier to treat people for opioid addiction. And doctors in Rio Arriba County—an area hard-hit by drug addiction—are hoping the new laws will provide relief to patients there.

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Bioethical questions around the use of fetal tissue in research have been central to a House panel’s investigation, but opponents say it’s all political theater aimed at restricting abortion. The debate is unfolding in New Mexico, as both an Albuquerque abortion clinic and researchers here respond to that panel’s queries.

Courtesy of Dr. Fiona Sinclair

  In order to help babies that are born too early, you’ve got to experiment on fetal tissue. At least that’s what scientists say. A House panel investigation of this kind of research has raised its profile. We went to the University of New Mexico Hospital to find out how fetal tissue is used.

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A congressional panel investigating fetal tissue exchange held its first hearing this week, and among the topics of debate: Should institutions be forced to turn over a list of names of the people involved? Officials at the University of New Mexico have expressed concerns about doing so.

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Among Americans who make less than $30,000 a year, about half of them have high-speed Internet at home, but a program might help narrow the digital divide.

The program is called Lifeline, and right now it allows people with lower incomes to have cheap—or sometimes free—phone service.

A still from the Town Hall video

Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz hosted a town hall meeting in Carlsbad last night to talk about recovery efforts at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. It's the nation's only underground nuclear waste storage facility, just 26 miles east of the town. WIPP has remained closed since the radiation leak in mid-February, and the cause of the leak remains unclear.

Secretary Moniz promised the crowd that WIPP will re-open, and members of New Mexico’s congressional delegation talked about their efforts to get WIPP the funds it needs to operate safely.

Photo via www.kcet.org

The congressional Super-Committee has failed to settle on a bipartisan proposal to cut the nation's deficit by 1.5 trillion dollars. But as Ruxandra Guidi reports for the Fronteras Changing America Desk, some advocates for immigration reform have been calling for cuts to border enforcement.

Photo via Wikimedia

The Justice Department has been under fire for months for the so-called “Fast and Furious” gun-walking program. That’s the A-T-F operation that tried to build criminal cases against Mexican drug cartels and their weapons suppliers.

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The Department of Homeland Security is under scrutiny in Congress over recent changes to immigration enforcement, including deportations. From our Fronteras Changing America Desk, Ruxandra Guidi has our story.

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It happens every 10 years.  First, the census.  Then squabbles over drawing new lines for Congressional districts. The big debate is usually over whether to carve out a minority district or spread the minorities out amongst districts, making their political agenda more widely heard. In northeastern Arizona it’s surprisingly less of a squabble.