KUNM

Albuquerque Rapid Transit

Catherine Page Harris


  Friday 5/18 8a: During the spring semester, professors with the School of Architecture taught two classes where students did projects around Albuquerque, and in collaboration with community members.

Megan Kamerick

New Mexico People, Places and Ideas Fri. 4/6 8a: Albuquerque’s newly elected Mayor Tim Keller has pronounced Albuquerque’s Rapid Transit bus system built to run down the middle of Central a “bit of a lemon.” Why? Well, the electric buses leak, can't hold a proper charge, and don’t align with stations. What's worse, Albuquerque spent $130 million on the system, relying on an $80 million reimbursement from the federal governemtn, but Mayor Keller says that “check is not in the mail." Now what? Stephen Spitz sits down with the mayor to learn more about these problems and where ART is headed.

Victor Onimole / KUNM

Construction workers tore up Albuquerque’s main avenue for well over a year installing ART, or Albuquerque Rapid Transit. And even though the new stations light up at night, the system isn’t working. The city’s new mayor said at a news conference on Tuesday, Jan. 9, that ART has a ways to go before it’s operational. 

Victor Onimole / KUNM/University of New Mexico

By the end of this year, Albuquerque drivers will be able to head up and down Central Avenue without seeing bulldozers and cranes. Heavy construction on the Albuquerque Rapid Transit Project is scheduled to end this month. For over a year, about 10 miles of Central have been torn up and worked on. This sparked protests, discussion and anti-ART signs around the city. Construction workers said the hard work and unpleasant interactions they face are part of the job. KUNM visited the Cornell and San Pedro ART bus stations.

Albuquerque Transit / Creative Commons

The Albuquerque Rapid Transit project is looking to attract new riders. That means cameras: on buses, at ART stops, and at intersections.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

The feds released a report on the most dangerous intersection in central New Mexico for pedestrians. It links improvements there to the controversial Albuquerque Rapid Transit project, or ART

brtabq.com

The city of Albuquerque received word Tuesday that it got the OK on federal support to build a bus rapid transit system.

 

The Albuquerque Rapid Transit project would create dedicated bus lanes in the middle of Central Avenue. It's expected to cost the city nearly $120 million dollars with – about $70 million coming from the Federal Transit Administration according to President Obama’s budget.

 

Numerous businesses along Central fear prolonged construction and congestion that could deter customers.

 

 

Albuquerque Transit / Creative Commons

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 2/11 8a: The city of Albuquerque was approved for a federal grant to build a rapid transit bus system down Central Avenue. The city would also borrow $13 million to fund the project. The design would create a center lane along the corridor for buses running every 7 to 8 minutes.