KUNM

Albuquerque City Council

Hanlly Sam via CC


Let’s Talk New Mexico 1/18 8a: Call now 277-KUNM or 277-5866. Albuquerque’s City Council passed the Pedestrian Safety Ordinance late last year, which makes it illegal for people to stand near freeway ramps or in medians and to interact with drivers. It’s also illegal for drivers to interact with people standing in those spaces.

 

Do you think the law is helpful to public safety and will help prevent pedestrian deaths or traffic accidents? Or do you think it targets people experiencing extreme poverty in Albuquerque? Is the law a violation of free speech or other constitutionally guaranteed rights?

Nicolás Boullosa via Compfight CC

Tiny homes are being praised around the country as an affordable solution to homelessness. Voters in Bernalillo County approved 2 million dollars a year ago to launch a tiny home village project for people experiencing homelessness in the Albuquerque area.

Incentives For Equal Pay, Do They Work?

May 13, 2015
red5standingby via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 5/14 8a:  

The Albuquerque City Council passed a pay equity ordinance last week that provides incentives to companies that pay women at least 90 percent of what they pay men in comparable jobs. The ordinance is being lauded as a national model, but does it go far enough? We'd like to hear from you! Email callinshow@kunm.org, post your comments online or call in live during the show. 

Guests:

Bosque Construction Continues

Feb 19, 2015
Rita Daniels

City Councilors in Albuquerque voted Wednesday to halt construction of a trail in the Rio Grande bosque. Many nature advocates say their trust was damaged when the city started cutting a six-foot wide path through the forest along the banks of the river without giving public notice.

People's Choice: Decriminalize Marijuana?

Sep 8, 2014
Alexa Graham via Flickr

    

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 9/11 8a

The Santa Fe City Council approved a measure decriminalizing marijuana. Albuquerque's Mayor Richard Berry vetoed a similar proposal. And now the Bernalillo County Commission is planning to ask voters if they think possession of small amounts of marijuana should mean fines instead of jail sentences.

We'll ask what decriminalization means for individuals and government agencies in New Mexico. Is decriminalization a stepping stone to legalization on a statewide level? What are the benefits? What are potential pitfalls?