Morning Edition

Monday - Tuesday 5:00a - 8:30a, Wednesday - Friday 5:00a - 8:00a
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne
Carrie Jung

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition, bringing the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

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Television
3:33 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Competition, High Bills Hurt Cable Companies

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. In the next few days, cable companies announce how they did financially in 2012. Most industry watchers expect some negative trends to continue. More people are canceling their cable subscriptions. They are called cord cutters, because they are getting TV from the Internet and over the air, not their cable cords. But they're not the only problem the cable industry needs to worry about. NPR's Neda Ulaby reports.

NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: Meet Comcast's worst nightmare.

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The Salt
1:04 am
Wed January 30, 2013

To Maximize Weight Loss, Eat Early in The Day, Not Late

Front-loading your calories may help you lose weight.
Gaelle Cohen iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 8:44 am

You've heard the dieting advice to eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a pauper? Well, there's mounting evidence that there's some truth to it.

A new study published in the International Journal of Obesity builds on previous studies that suggest it's best not to eat too many calories late in the day.

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Law
1:03 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Polling Firm Gallup Lands In Legal Hot Water

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 11:17 am

The Gallup Organization made its name with landmark public opinion polls. The company surveyed everything from presidential elections to religious preferences, branding itself as the most trusted name in polling.

But lately, Gallup's name has been tarnished by a whistle-blower lawsuit and a suspension from winning federal contracts.

Gallup's roots stretch back to 1922, when its founder, George Gallup, was a college junior. He got a summer job interviewing people in St. Louis.

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Asia
1:02 am
Wed January 30, 2013

In China, The Government Isn't The Only Spy Game In Town

A man sells surveillance cameras at the main electronics market in Tienhe district, Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province, on Aug. 8.
EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 8:44 am

The final of two reports

It all started with a local Chinese official.

He couldn't figure out how his wife, who suspected him of having an affair, knew the contents of his private conversations.

"His wife knew things that he said in his car and office, including conversations over the telephone," recalls Qi Hong, a former journalist from Shandong province in eastern China, and a friend of the official.

So Qi asked a buddy who owned bug-detecting equipment to help.

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Science
12:59 am
Wed January 30, 2013

When Crime Pays: Prison Can Teach Some To Be Better Criminals

Prison provides an opportunity for networking with more seasoned criminals.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 9:26 am

In popular lore — movies, books and blogs — criminals who go to prison don't come out reformed. They come out worse.

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Sweetness And Light
11:45 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

History Joins The 49ers In Opposing Ray Lewis

Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis speaks at a news conference in New Orleans on Monday. The Ravens face the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII on Sunday. It will be Lewis' last game.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 7:09 am

When Secretariat won what was certified to be his last race, I went down onto the track at Woodbine, and gauging where he had crossed the finish line, snatched up the last grass that perhaps the greatest thoroughbred ever had laid hooves to in his career.

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Economy
11:42 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Study: Nearly Half In U.S. Lack Financial Safety Net

Nearly 44 percent of Americans don't have enough savings or other liquid assets to stay out of poverty for more than three months if they lose their income, according to the Corporation for Enterprise Development.
Atanas Bezov iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 9:03 am

In his inaugural address, President Obama talked about a country where even "a little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else." But in reality, that's not always the case. A new report finds that one of the biggest obstacles for many Americans is that they don't have the savings or assets they need to help them get ahead.

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U.S.
2:21 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Debate Over Rebuilding Beaches Post-Sandy Creates Waves

Ongoing beach nourishment, like this project in Viriginia Beach, has been the topic of debate. Some people say it's needed to protect beach communities; others decry the costs.
Pam Spaugy U.S. Army

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 10:49 am

For a half-century, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been in the beach business, dredging up new sand as shorelines wash away. Federal disaster aid for Superstorm Sandy could provide billions more for beach rebuilding, and that has revived an old debate: Is this an effective way to protect against storms, or a counterproductive waste of tax dollars?

On a recent blustery day at Virginia Beach, the latest beach nourishment project is in full swing. A bulldozer smooths out pyramids of sand, and on the horizon, a large, black hopper dredge appears with another load.

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Around the Nation
6:36 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Virginia To Repeal 'Living In Sin' Law

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:36 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Two Is A Coincidence, Three Is A Trend

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Two is a coincidence. Three is a trend. That's why an Oklahoma City house has been dubbed The Twin House, after a third consecutive couple living there had twins - a boy and a girl each. Current tenants, Brady and Chelsea Smith, said they didn't believe in the twin mojo when they moved in. Then an ultrasound showed she was expecting twins. New father Brady Smith told the Oklahoman, now his friends won't even drive down the block.

Africa
3:21 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Timbuktu Freed From Islamist Fighters

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 6:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The city of Timbuktu is free...

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Mali, Mali, Mali, Mali...

INSKEEP: ...and residents cheered as French and Malian forces entered the city. Those forces swept aside Islamist rebels who'd controlled the place for months. The Islamists rule included amputations and the destroyed ancient tombs. It ended with the burning of a library housing priceless manuscripts.

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Politics
3:16 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Sen. Flake Comments On Immigration Overhaul

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 6:36 am

An immigration plan announced Monday by a bipartisan group of senators would create a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country and overhaul legal immigration. It also calls for improved border security and better tracking of individuals in the U.S. on visas. Steve Inskeep talks with one of the senators behind the plan, Republican Jeff Flake from Arizona.

The Record
1:40 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Rising Postal Rates Squeeze Small Record Labels

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:51 am

Prices on mail sent through the U.S. Postal Service increased this week — the price of a first-class stamp now costs 46 cents, up a penny. But for small businesses that ship products overseas, like many independent record labels, the costs could be much larger.

Brian Lowit, who has worked at Washington, D.C.'s Dischord Records for 10 years, says that while a postage rate hike is a familiar bump in the road, "I've never seen one this drastic."

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Research News
1:38 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Bird, Plane, Bacteria? Microbes Thrive In Storm Clouds

The eye of Hurricane Earl in the Atlantic Ocean, seen from a NASA research aircraft on Aug. 30, 2010. This flight through the eyewall caught Earl just as it was intensifying from a Category 2 to a Category 4 hurricane. Researchers collected air samples on this flight from about 30,000 feet over both land and sea and close to 100 different species of bacteria.
Jane Peterson NASA

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 6:36 am

Microbes are known to be able to thrive in extreme environments, from inside fiery volcanoes to down on the bottom of the ocean. Now scientists have found a surprising number of them living in storm clouds tens of thousands of feet above the Earth. And those airborne microbes could play a role in global climate.

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Around the Nation
5:50 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Happy National Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:39 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Corporate Naming Rights For Buildings Proposed

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with a chance to get your name in stone. A lawmaker in Washington State proposed a way to make extra money: sell corporate naming rights to public buildings. It already happens with sports venues: the Mariners play at Safeco Field. Now, if this plan were to become law, kids could attend Nintendo Elementary School. Or they could drink from the Budweiser Water Tower. People in trouble with the law would of course make an appearance at the Enron Courthouse.

It's MORNING EDITION.

Remembrances
4:15 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Journalist Stanley Karnow Dies At 87

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You know, when I was a teenager, I got interested in the Vietnam War. And I found a book in the library, called "Vietnam: A History." It turned out that that searing story of one of America's most tragic wars, was the product of one of the most distinguished reporters in Southeast Asia.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Analysis
4:00 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Bipartisan Group Agrees To Overhauling Immigration

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

We have a clearer picture this morning of just what an immigration overhaul might look like.

INSKEEP: A bipartisan group of senators is spreading word that they have agreed on principles for change.

MONTAGNE: The proposal would include a pathway to citizen for millions of people now in the U.S. illegally. Republicans have led the opposition to that change, up to now, commonly calling it amnesty.

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Business
4:00 am
Mon January 28, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is, fly like an eagle. Maybe you've seen this viral video. It's of a golden eagle swooping down and snatching up a baby in a park. The bird carries the kid a few feet before dropping him and flying away.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It caused quite a stir online - horrifying many, many viewers before it was revealed as a hoax. The video was a project made by students at a 3-D animation and design school in Montreal.

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Digital Life
1:34 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Google Posts How It Handles Requests For Users' Data

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:11 am

Google wants you to know you're being watched. Or rather, the company wants you to know how and when the police get to watch what you do online.

For the first time, the company has posted its policies for when it gives up users' information to the government. It's part of a broader company strategy to push for tougher privacy laws.

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Business
1:33 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Beyond Portlandia: Subaru Drives For America's Heartland

Subaru, known for its success in Denver, the Pacific Northwest and the Northeast, aims to expand its market to Texas and Tennessee.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:11 am

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The Salt
1:31 am
Mon January 28, 2013

How One Man Tried To Slim Down Big Soda From The Inside

PepsiCo's product line ranges from salty chips and its sugary namesake drink to more healthful fare like hummus and yogurt. In 2010, the company announced plans to cut sugar, fat and sodium in its products to address health and nutrition concerns.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 6:42 am

Many big food companies are caught in a dilemma these days. They want to rebrand themselves as merchants of health — Coca-Cola's new anti-obesity ads are just the latest example — but many of their profits still come from products that make nutritionists scowl.

If there's one person who symbolizes this tension, it's Derek Yach.

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Space
5:49 am
Fri January 25, 2013

NASA Needs Your Help To Feed The Astronauts

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Not long ago on this program, we reported that food expiration dates are often meaningless. Let's take that concept into space. Researchers from the University of Hawaii and Cornell University are asking you to send them long-lasting recipes. They want to help NASA determine an extremely durable menu to keep astronauts fed, should the agency send people on a four-month journey to Mars. I got just one word for you, NASA: Cheetos. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:43 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Super Bowl Forces Nancy Pelosi To Pick A Team

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi recently had to make one of the toughest decisions of her political career: Who to root for in the Super Bowl, the Baltimore Ravens or the San Francisco 49ers. Pelosi was born in Baltimore. Her late father was the mayor there. But she represents San Franciscans in Congress and her kids grew up with the 49ers. So Pelosi says she's rooting for San Francisco but not against Baltimore.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
2:38 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Senate Changes Filibuster Rules

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When and if the U.S. Senate is ready to confirm Mary Jo White to head the SEC, she may find her path somewhat smoother - thanks to a rule change the Senate agreed to last night. The new Senate rule makes it just a little bit harder to block nominations, and a little easier to reach resolution than it was for President Obama's nominees in his first term. It's part of a subtle revision of the most potent weapon of the minority party: the filibuster. Here's NPR's David Welna.

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NPR Story
2:38 am
Fri January 25, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In today's last word in business is: censored, not stirred.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SKYFALL")

DANIEL CRAIG: (as James Bond) Bond, James Bond.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The new Bond film "Skyfall" is now playing in the world's second-largest movie market - that would be China - and some 007 fans are furious about the nips and tucks Chinese censors have made to the movie.

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NPR Story
2:38 am
Fri January 25, 2013

'Fruitvale' Stands Out At Sundance

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Snow, superstars, and cinema. That combination can mean only one thing at this time of year: The Sundance Film Festival. Our movie reviewer, Kenneth Turan, is on the scene in Park City, Utah, as he is every year, to tell us about some of the movies at Sundance. Good morning.

KENNETH TURAN, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: Let's start with dramas. What really stands out for you, Ken?

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StoryCorps
8:03 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

After Years Of Estrangement, Eight Siblings Become A Family

Bryan Wilmoth (right) reunited with his brother Michael years after their parents kicked Bryan out for being gay. All six of their siblings either ran away or were kicked out of their family's home over the years.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:14 am

When Bryan Wilmoth was in his late teens, his father found a love letter from a man in Bryan's box of things.

Furious at the discovery of a gay son, Bryan's father took him for a ride and dropped him off in the middle of the night with a $5 bill.

"That's sort of all I remember — sleeping outside in the country that night," Bryan, 50, recounts to his brother Michael, at StoryCorps in Los Angeles.

Growing up in a strict, religious household, Bryan and his seven younger siblings all became estranged from their parents over the years.

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Asia
5:31 am
Thu January 24, 2013

Ramen Bowl Offers Built-In iPhone Dock

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 11:19 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renée Montagne with a new invention for the lonely diner - a ramen bowl with a built-in iPhone dock. Eating the popular noodle dish normally requires two hands - one for chopsticks, the other for a spoon. Designers at a Taiwanese company noticed a guy trying to do that while juggling his cell phone. So they came up with a way to slurp it up while watching videos or reading emails hands free.

One flaw - no splash guard for the brothy dish. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Sports
5:23 am
Thu January 24, 2013

NFL's Frank Gore Fined For Dress Code Violation

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 11:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Frank Gore of the San Francisco 49ers had a terrible NFC championship game. Sure, he ran for two touchdowns. And yes, his team came back to win and made it to the Super Bowl. But pro football officials noticed his socks were sagging. It was his second dress code violation of the season and they fined him $10,500. Imagine what your bank account would like if your mom could do that to you.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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