Music
10:33 am
Thu May 19, 2011

J.A. Deane on the Radio

Thurs. 5/26 at noon: Avante-garde musician J.A. Deane joins Mark Weber in the studio to share music from some of the albums that influenced his art.

You ever wonder what's going on in the noggins of the avant-garde? John Cage scratches a turntable cartridge that is amplified and then noodles around with contact mikes stuck onto the spines of a saguaro and we're all politely sitting in our seats in a major concert hall listening to this? It's interesting the first time around, and I recommend it. The second time around you're on your own.

Anyway, I have a lot of friends who are avant-garde. Completely off their rockers. And yes, I do wonder what's going on inside their noggins. One of my closest friends is that way. J.A. Deane is a great guy and completely out there. His music is about energy and sound waves and energy flow (chi) and having fun. He started out as a trombonist (not to over-look his teenage surf garage band where he was the drummer.) But he worked in the Los Angeles studios as a trombonist and worked as a session horn man for Ike Turner at the famous Bolic Studios of the early 1970s. From there he went on the road with Tina Turner for a year where his duties involved providing the keyboard washes and the trombone. Sometime before that, though, he'd been introduced to the ARP 2600 synthesizer. Ever since, he's been involved in acoustic-electronic sounds and nowadays works off of a laptop having retired his trombone. In this capacity he has worked with composer Butch Morris for over twenty years providing live sampling and various other avant-garde touches. His own group Out of Context is in its 15th year -- a group that employs conduction methods of "in the moment" spontaneous composition.

So, I've asked Dino to come onto the Thursday jazz show and play some of the records that turned him around. Or, rather, the jazz records that pointed him outwards. The jazz records that were a part of his development as an artist. (His selection follows, below.) And I'll ask him to comment on what each one means to him.

I like to rattle the cages of my avant-garde friends and accuse them of being aesthetic Darwinists, in that they believe jazz evolves in successive waves of development, each new development trumping the current style, hopscotching one over the other. Obviously, an approach such as this runs toward a planned obsolescence and the law of diminishing returns, but, so far, it hasn't been a problem with our guest today.
Like I always say: Somebody's got to do it.

--Mark Weber

PLAYLIST:

1- Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five
STRUTTIN' WITH SOME BARBECUE 3:05

2- Gerald Wilson Big Band - Moment of Truth
VIVA TIRADO 5:08

3- Jimmy Smith - Organ Grinder's Swing
GREENSLEEVES 8:54

4- Art Blakey - Free for All
FREE FOR ALL 11:09

5- Jackie McLean - Destination Out
ESOTERIC 9:06

6- Archie Shepp - Fire Music
THE GIRL FROM IPANEMA 8:33

7. John Coltrane - Meditations
THE FATHER AND THE SON AND THE HOLY GHOST 12:51

8. Miles Davis - ESP
EIGHTY-ONE 6:16

9. Gil Evans - The Individualism Of Gil Evans
THE BARBARA SONG 9:59

slideshow photo: Dino J.A. Deane (http://www.punktfestival.no)

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