KUNM

Sarah Trujillo

News Intern

Sarah was born and raised in Albuquerque, so she is familiar with Burqueño culture. A lover of music and journalism, Sarah began reporting news for the Daily Lobo in the summer of 2016 and began covering public health for KUNM in the fall of 2016. She is finishing up her Bachelor's degree in Mass Communication and Journalism, and is planning on continuing journalism around the globe. In her spare time she likes to workout, read, and chill with her cats.

lu_lu via flickr / Creative Commons License

More kids are dying across the country this year from the flu, but so far, no children have died from the flu in New Mexico.

Dr. Heather Pratt-Chavez said her clinic waiting room at UNM has been packed, but that New Mexicans are usually pretty good at getting their kids vaccinated. So, she’s happy there have been no reported pediatric deaths. The flu is a sneaky virus, though, she said, and it’s never too late to get the vaccine.

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On Friday, Feb. 2, lawmakers in Santa Fe got closer to putting legalizing recreational cannabis on the ballot. Advocates say that could help with the state’s opioid overdose rate.

Sarah Trujillo via KUNM

Folks gathered this afternoon in downtown Albuquerque to urge Congress to continue protections for people who were brought to the U.S. as children illegally.

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The New Mexico Attorney General is 1 of 22 officials fighting the rollback of net neutrality. The Federal Communications Commission’s deregulation of the Internet could affect people of color disproportionately. Folks advocating for the free flow of information say things could get a lot worse.

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The Childrens Health Insurance Program covers over 9 million kids nationally, but the well of federal funds has been dry for months, and with strife in Congress, uncertainty lingers.

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

Nearly one in 10 Americans works in the health care industry. It’s the same for our state, but there’s still a shortage of nurses here. Some schools are making efforts to get more nurses into the field.

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The Albuquerque-area’s public safety net hospital can no longer demand half upfront from uninsured folks getting medically necessary surgeries as of late last week. But advocates say the hospital has yet to fully put this change into practice.

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It’s about time for open enrollment on the state health insurance exchange. The New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange is partnering with Catholic Charities to offer residents free one-on-one appointments with insurance agents and brokers starting November 4th.

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The World Gay Rodeo Finals will be hosted this Saturday and Sunday at Expo New Mexico in Albuquerque.

With the event, the New Mexico Gay Rodeo Association aims to provide a safe space for people who identify as LGBTQ to compete and share their experiences.

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President Trump dealt another major blow to the Affordable Care Act this week — axing subsidies to insurers that help with out-of-pocket expenses for low-income folks.

Local advocates for health care access are calling on Congress to take action to protect the payments. 

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Flu season is here and state officials are urging people to get vaccinated.

Around 36,000 people across the country die each year from the flu, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

Folks gathered at polling locations across Albuquerque today to decide on the next mayor and city councilors, and a sick leave question. The line was long at the University of New Mexico.

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There’s been a sharp uptick in confirmed West Nile virus cases this year, alongside recent heavy rains.

The state Department of Health and Governor Susana Martinez are advising people to take precautions against the mosquito borne disease.

Allan Ajifo, CC 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

New Mexico’s flagship university has received a $7 million grant to open a new behavioral health center. Researchers will work directly with people in communities dealing with addiction and mental health issues. 

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Albuquerque’s water utility is helping out a small New Mexico town to the south.

The Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority sent a 6,000-gallon water tanker to supply residents in Carrizozo while that city investigates sulfate contamination in the groundwater supply.

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UPDATE 8/24: The vote to put additional fluoride into the water supply in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County was postponed Wednesday night, after lacking enough votes from water utility board members to pass the measure.

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Health advocates want money from an $18 million settlement from Volkswagen to be invested in new electric school buses in order to improve the state’s air quality.

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Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act died in Congress last week – at least for now. But local insurance carriers are still struggling with a lot of unknowns under President Trump.

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New Mexico has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the nation, and now that the Trump Administration has slashed funding for teen pregnancy prevention projects, researchers here say it’s like the rug has been pulled out from under them.

Sarah Trujillo via KUNM

An Iraqi man chose to seek refuge in a church in Albuquerque today rather than report for deportation.

Pixabay via Public Domain

The South Valley near Albuquerque is seeing an agricultural renaissance of sorts. First Choice Community Healthcare just broke ground today on a community farm there. Advocates are fixing their attention on local food as a form of preventative health care.

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What if you’re racing to the hospital, but it’s an hour away – or more? Pregnant women living in northern New Mexico have to cross over sixty miles to deliver their babies with a doctor or midwife. But in this state, half the battle is getting physicians to work in rural areas.

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The Senate released a revised GOP health care bill on Thursday, June 22, with major cuts to Medicaid, reproductive health, and mental health programs widely used by people in New Mexico. Advocates are saying the changes could have long-lasting negative impacts.

Sarah Trujillo / KUNM

More than three years after the health care expansion, 43 percent of New Mexico’s total population is signed up for Medicaid. But budgets are tight, and the Human Services Department is trying to figure out how to make it all work. Some of the  proposals presented at a public meeting in Albuquerque were contentious.

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The New Mexico Human Services Department released its plan for the fate of Medicaid, and it includes massive cuts that could sever coverage for thousands.

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The Environmental Protection Agency and the Trump Administration are facing a lawsuit after they suspended a rule to curb oil and gas industry methane emissions for 90 days.

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As Republicans work to fulfill their promises to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, the future of healthcare in the U.S. is up in the air. In New Mexico, health insurance carriers have to submit their proposed premium rates by this weekend. After state officials review them, the public will have 10 days to weigh in.

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The Higher Education Department announced this week that the share of tuition covered by the lottery scholarship will drop from 90 percent to 60 percent. But student leaders say the scholarship is vital for students who rely on it. 

Rashad Mahmood, KUNM

New Mexico environment officials say they’ll present a plan to clean up a toxic underground plume at a public meeting Thursday evening in Albuquerque.

Ed Williams/KUNM

Stroke is one of the most common medical emergencies. The effects of a stroke last a lifetime, and treating the condition can be extremely expensive. But if doctors can diagnose and treat a stroke quickly, they can reduce the damage a patient suffers. 

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