Megan Kamerick

Reporter

Freelance Reporter and Contributor to Women's Focus.

Ways to Connect

Jill Hodges and her husband adopted their son from Guatemala when he was six months old. At the time, they had very little information about his birth family in Guatemala. But whe stories began surfacing from that country about corruption in the adoption process and possible coercion, they wanted to find his birth mother to make sure she gave him up willingly, and to create a pathway for their son to connect with his birth family. Hodges chronicles that journey in "Extended Family," which is screening this weekend at the Santa Fe Film Festival.

In 1986, Sister Peggy O’Neill left behind her life in the U.S. to work in El Salvador. The Central American country was in the grip of a brutal civil war. Even nuns and priests had been murdered by government death squads.  But she stayed, working with the poor in the town of Suchitoto. O’Neill, a nun with the Sisters of Charity, will be in Albuquerque this evening to talk about the center she created for young people. Centro Arte Para la Paz promotes peace through the arts, creativity, imagination and cultural exchange.  

Girl shot in head by Taliban for advocating for girls' education recovering in British hospital; humans rights activist worry more incidents against women in Afghanistan becoming common; Mongolian women boost representation in Parliament; female lawyers in Saudi Arabia can now appear in court;  Retail Action Project supports female cashier advocating to stop on-call shifts among national retailers; Indian Health Service lags on making emergency contraception available to Native women; American Association of University Women releases new report showing pay disparity starts early; CNN remove

Ireland reviews abortion laws after Indian woman dies; women's groups press BBC to examine gender bias; 2012 elections bring historic number of women to U.S. Senate; female U.S. Representatives criticize Senators for comments about Ambassador Susan Rice; Catalyst report on women losing out on key jobs; European Union Executive Branch pushes for more women leaders in European companies; gender violence against lesbians in South Africa; Saudi Arabia's highly educated women struggle to get jobs;  women's Arab uprising group accuses Facebook of censorship; State Sen.

Courtesy of 516 ARTS

So exactly what kind of sound might stop a Mexican Grey Wolf from taking down a cow?

That's just one of the questions explored by the International Symposium on Electronic Arts. Albuquerque recently hosted ISEA,bringing top international artists for performances, lectures and art installations. It's the first time the event has been in the U.S. since 2006.

FreeFoto.com

A developer is suing Rio Rancho for $5.6 million. At issue are credits it earned for infrastructure it built at a large planned community in the city and a new ordinance that slashes or eliminates impact fees.

Michael Hess

KUNM Call In Show 9/27  8a:  New Mexico has high alpine meadows, desert badlands and everything in between. But it also has its share of challenges when it comes to the environment. Those include historic issues such as mining, grazing and energy development. But there are new pressures as well, such as climate change, drought, and the loss of rural lands to development.

Nicholas Suhor

  New Mexico has a long history of leading solar development. This continues to be true, despite the closure of Schott Solar earlier this summer. A new company hopes to start manufacturing again at the Schott plant. It faces significant challenges from offshore competitors. But there are many other companies in the solar industry here that are finding success.

We're used to putting the blame for climate change on industrial plants and gas-guzzling cars and trucks. But Santa Fe architect Edward Mazria says it's actually the buildings we live in that are the worst offenders.  

Mazria is the author of the Passive Solar Energy Book used by builders worldwide.  He'll  be speaking tonight in Albuquerque.  KUNM's Conservation Beat reporter Megan Kamerick caught up with Mazria for a sneak preview of his talk.

Flcelloguy, via Wikimedia Commons

Hearings resume on Aug. 28 on drilling wastes generated by the oil and gas industry. At issue are rules put in place under the previous administration governing thousands of waste pits and underground storage tanks.

By Randy Son of Robert, via Flickr

A new water treatment facility opened in Las Cruces on Aug. 23 and is supposed to clean up water from a toxic Superfund site. The pollution was detected in the city’s water wells years ago, but a specific source for the contaminants remains elusive.

Federal, state and local officials were on hand to open the new facility, which will remove the chemical perchloroethylene from groundwater. PCE is a widely used in dry cleaning fabrics and for metal degreasing operations.

The Valles Caldera National Preserve is one of the most iconic sites in New Mexico. It’s a sweeping landscape of meadows and forests that sits in the massive crater of a collapsed volcano. Congress bought the former ranch in 2000 and created the preserve with a special mandate:  Become financially self-sufficient by 2015.

Michael Hess

  This year at the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market, a federation of silk weavers made thousands from sales of its scarves.

That’s good news for the impoverished women of the Sahalandy Federation of Madagascar. But it’s also good for the island nation’s forests, home to the wild Malagasy silkworm.

Woman's execution sparks protests in Afghanistan, Seventeen magazine bows to teen's petition campaign, nuns wrap up bus tour protesting federal cuts,  new pro-lesbian super PAC forms, Saudi Arabia sends female athletes to Olympics, Helen Mirren calls for more female directors

Olympics news, Air Force sex abuse scandal update, remembering  Sally Ride, French parliament pushes for anti-sexual harassment law, African conference calls for investing in female entrepreneurs, New Mexico dedicates marker to Maria Martinez

Courtesy U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Climate change is a threat to New Mexico’s natural environment and a new study argues that makes it a serious economic threat as well.

Tourism, the creative arts, agriculture, ranching, and the dairy industry all stand to lose millions of dollars, according to Demos, the public policy group that published “New Mexico’s Rising Economic Risks from Climate Change.” The report is authored by Robert Repetto, author of the 2011 book, "America’s Climate Problem: The Way Forward." He is a senior fellow in the United Nations Foundation’s climate and energy program.

Staci Stevens

Audubon New Mexico released a report on the heels of a visit here by Interior Department Secretary Ken Salazar. The study argues that restoring natural streamflows will bring environmental and economic benefits.

Dams, reservoirs, and levees are all tools used to alter the natural flow of a river for crop irrigation, drinking water and industrial use. The benefits are substantial. But they also create major changes to the natural flow pattern of New Mexico’s rivers and streams.

Courtesy of Sen. Tom Udall

The recent rains brought some relief to New Mexico’s parched forests, but they also brought a rash of lightning-caused fires.

Firefighters are responding to several smoke reports in the Questa Ranger District, according to U.S. Forest Service officials. They expect no problems. However, more smoke reports are anticipated as temperatures increase and humidity decreases.

US Bureau of Reclamation

Large scale water projects are a growing phenomenon in the West. But a new study argues they could lead to water shortages and increased costs.

The majority of roads in the Santa Fe National Forest will now be closed to motorized travel, according to the Albuquerque Journal. But two environmental groups say the plan still leaves too much of the forest open to vehicle traffic.

The Record of Decision came after nearly six years of analysis and public comment. The Forest Service evaluated more than 7,000 miles of roads and trails and designated about 2,400 miles where motorized travel will be allowed. It also prohibited off-road motorized travel.

DOE proposes storing tons of mercury near WIPP site

Jun 26, 2012

The U.S. Department of Energy is eying two sites in Eddy County to store 10,000 metric tons of mercury (about 22 million pounds). A site in West Texas was DOE’s preferred storage spot, according to the Carlsbad Current-Argus. But now the federal agency is exploring two locations near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad.

Jody Knox, president of the Carlsbad Department of Development, said her board supports the proposal.

For the first time since its premier in 1986,  the complete series PowerPlay by Judy Chicago will be on display. The series of large paintings, drawings and bronzes explores the construct of masculinity and the effect it has on men as well as women. It will be on display from June 29-August 11 at the David Richard Gallery in Santa Fe.  Chicago will discuss the series with Jonathan Katz, a leading proponent of queer theory, at an event on July 7. For more information, go to www.throughtheflower.org.

Sudan releases woman slated for stoning, Hillary Clinton pushes for reproductive rights at UN conference, study finds links between IVF and cancer, Michigan female lawmakers protest with Vagina Monologues

Sat. 6/23 12p: Judy Chicago's work "ReViewing Power Play," is a series of paintings that premiered in the 1980s and examined the construct of masculinity. The David Richard Gallery in Santa Fe will present the original series from June 29-Aug. 11.

Women protestors attacked in Cairo, Franciscan friars show support for nuns, Paycheck Fairness Act blocked, women under-represented in news coverage of 2012 election

Bosses in traditional marraiages featuring traditional gender roles feel less positive about working women,  teenager leads campaign against Seventeen magazine over altered photos, advocates call for arming victims of domestic violence in Turkey, VAWA reauthorization.

Megan Kamerick interviews Allison  Engel, who with her sister, Margaret Engel, wrote a one-woman show about the Texas journalist called "Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins." The play has been making stops around the country with star Kathleen Turner.

An interview by Megan Kamerick with Andrea Stone of the Huffington Post about the ongoing investigation into the National Women's History Museum conducted by Stone and her colleague, Christina Wilkie.The museum has made very little progress over the last 16 years, despite big name sponsors like Meryl Streep who have helped raise nearly $10 million.

International Women's Day events around the world, women veterans push to drop Limbaugh from Armed Forces Radio, ACLU represents Gallup girl humiliated by school for being pregnant

Saturday 10/15  at 12pm: The Ponzi scheme by Bernie Madoff is the largest in history, with some 16,000 victims from all over the world. They range from the super wealthy of the Persian Gulf to middle-class teachers in New Mexico. We interview Diana B. Henriques, the New York Times reporter whose book "The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust" explores the fraud in detail and its terrible aftermath.

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