Megan Kamerick


Freelance Reporter and Contributor to Women's Focus.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Freida Lee Mock

  In 1991, African-American law professor Anita Hill walked into a political firestorm when she testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the confirmation process for Clarence Thomas, the first African-American nominee to the Supreme Court.

In a calm, dignified voice, she detailed the alleged sexual harassment she suffered from Thomas when he headed the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. It was a turning point in American history and ignited a national debate about gender equity, sexual misconduct and power in the workplace.

Courtesy 516 ARTS

Artists Jessica Angel and Claudia X. Valdes join Suzanne Sbarge and Teresa Buscemi of 516 ARTS to discuss the new Digital Latin America exhibit, which looks at the ways in which artists negotiate the complex terrain between global and local, virtual and real, and political and private, in the creation of work that proposes alternative understandings of technology, art and cultural exchange.

Courtesy of Tony Gallegos

Fri. 4/4 8a: Our guests run two successful business incubators in New Mexico. Tony Gallegos is CEO of the South Valley Economic Development Center and Marie Longserre is president and CEO of the Santa Fe Business Incubator. These organizations have helped entrepreneurs create hundreds of jobs around the state, but they often fly under the radar while big corporate announcements grab the headlines.


South Valley Economic Development Center

Santa Fe Business Incubator

Courtesy 516 ARTS

What does the condition of the city’s urban core say about the heart and soul of the city? Heart of the City, organized by 516 ARTS, is a collaborative project and exhibition that examine intersections of art, urban planning, cultural and economical development, education and community dialogue through a variety of lenses to focus on the urban center and identity of the city.

Courtesy 516 ARTS

Kate Bonansinga, author of "Curating at the Edge: Artists Respond to the U.S./Mexico Border," talks about the companion exhibit "Art at the Border: 21st Century Responses" at 516 ARTS. And artist Tania Candiana discusses her piece in the show as well.

Michael Grimes via Flickr and Creative Commons

September 21, 2013

Courtesy of Rahim AlHaj

Rahim AlHaj  fled Iraq in 1991 and eventually landed in Albuquerque, where he now lives. He will perform as part of the Peace Talks Radio 10th anniversary celebration on Sept. 13 in Santa Fe.

Courtesy of the Art of Revolution/One Million Bones project

In June of this year, the National Mall in Washington D.C. was the site of a huge art installation. One million bones, crafted by students, educators, artists and activists from around the world, were laid out across this iconic space in the nation's capital. The idea was to make a powerful visual call for action against ongoing genocide and mass atrocities in Sudan, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Burma, Somalia and Syria.

Courtesy of Stewart Lyons

The hit show “Breaking Bad” launched its final episodes recently on AMC. The series is set and filmed in Albuquerque and focuses on chemistry teacher Walter White. He turns to cooking methamphetamine to provide for his family after he is diagnosed with cancer.

On a hot summer afternoon in Albuquerque, N.M., the setting for the hit TV show Breaking Bad, a trolley that resembles a roving adobe house is packed with tourists.

The series follows Walter White, a chemistry teacher who turns to cooking methamphetamine to provide for his family after he gets cancer. The show, which begins its final season Sunday, has attracted critical acclaim, a slew of awards and rabid fans — some of whom have crammed onto the trolley for a tour of Breaking Bad filming sites.

David Weaver / Creative Commons

July 13, 2013

Texas Legislature passes restrictive abortion bill while protestors have tampons and other feminine products confiscated; Ireland allows abortion in limited circumstances; Malala Yousafzai addresses United Nations; women's rights under assault in Afghanistan; Women of the Wall blocked by Orthodox protestors; U.N. calls for stop to assaults in Egyptian protests;  Church of England votes to ordain women bishops; Wimbledon stories overlook the fact that four British women have won the tournament since 1936; women sue city of Santa Fe over former police officer.

Omba Arts Trust and International Folk Art Market | Santa Fe

More than 190 artists will converge on the Santa Fe this year for the 10th anniversary of the International Folk Art Market July 12-14.  The money they earn will preserve important cultural traditions worldwide and it also offers a stepping stone to economic independence. Many artists find their way to the market through nonprofit groups that help them build their networks and open up new markets.



Jane Bernard

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the International Folk Art Market | Santa Fe. Money earned over three days by these artists allows them to preserve important cultural traditions and develop everything from housing to health centers in poor communities. For two women, reviving traditional art forms has been essential to helping their countries overcome the horrors of genocide.


Courtesy 516 ARTS

516 ARTS in Albuquerque will premier "Land, Air, Seed" and "Octopus Dreams" on June 29. The show of contemporary Native artists explores issues of home and exile, displacement, and cultural reappropriation.

Megan Kamerick talks with curators Nancy Marie Mithlo, Suzanne Fricke and Beverly Morris, as well as artist Deborah Jojola of Isleta Pueblo and Suzanne Sbarge of 516 ARTS.

By United States Mission Geneva (Flickr: Logo of the World Health Organization) [CC-BY-2.0 (], via Wikimedia Commons

June 22, 2013

A new report by the World Health Organization finds one in three women around the world suffer domestic violence.

By US-Air Force [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

June 8, 2013

The Air Force named Maj. Gen. Margaret H. Woodward to head its sexual assault and prevention office after the man heading that effort was arrested for sexual battery.

By DoD photo by Glenn Fawcett. (Released) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

May 19, 2013

President Obama calls sexual assault in the military a threat to national security.

Google Images via Creative Commons

April 27, 2013

The rape of a young girl brings protesters out into the streets once more in India.

Jim Ankan Deka / Creative Commons

In this week's news: India’s Parliament passes bill creating harsher penalties for crimes against women.

Courtesy of Deborah Gavel

A Prayer For Juárez and the West Mesa is a community art event on March 24 at 2 p.m. to remember the murdered women of Ciudad Juárez and those found on Albuquerque's West Mesa in 2009, as well as all victims of violence. 

516 ARTS

A new show at 516 ARTS in Albuquerque features diverse visual art media that explores the idea of surfaces through painting, sculpture, photography, electronic media and performance art. Some surfaces tantalize, some fortify and some allow us just a peek inside. Megan Kamerick talks with curator Lea Anderson and artists Jennifer Cawley, Jessica Kennedy and Alex Kraft.

NCAI / Creative Commons

After months of delay in Congress, the Violence Against Women Act is reauthorized, Arkansas adopts most restrictive law on abortion, Vatican, Russia and Iran oppose language on eliminating violence against women, UN investigator says empowering women would reduce hunger, the Balkans get less macho, Obama nominates two women to cabinet posts and a woman to head the Air Force Academy, news study shows life expectancy falling for U.S. women, Afghanistan marks International Women's Day with first women's film festival, Hannah Skandera confirmation hearing continues in New Mexico Legislature.

Penn State Newstream / Creative Commons

Megan Kamerick talks with Sara Ganim about the stories that landed her a Pulitzer Prize at age 24. Ganim wrote the first stories about Jerry Sandusky,  a former Penn State University coach convicted of molesting young boys.

Amaianos / Creative Commons

Women around the world call for ending sexual violence at One Billion Rising events, Olympic runner Oscar Pistorius charged in girlfriend's murder, Egyptian officials blame women for sexual assaults, Senate passes Violence Against Women Act reauthorization, more women are using Plan B birth control, Irish government accepts partial blame for enslaving women in Magdalene laundries, Human Rights Watch accuses Canadian Mounties of discriminating against Native women,  girl shot by Taliban for advocating for girls' education leaves hospital, New Mexico Medical Board exonerates doctor in aborti

Courtesy of the Energy and Enterprise Initiative

Bob Inglis believes in climate change and that doomed his re-election bid in 2010. The South Carolina Republican lost his Congressional seat after being targeted by the Tea Party. But he continues his quest to find climate solutions based on free enterprise. Inglis launched the Energy and Enterprise Initiative last year at George Mason University. He was in Albuquerque this week and spoke with KUNM’s Megan Kamerick.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marionne T. Mangrum

Pentagon lifts ban on women in combat, renewed push on VAWA, report indicts India's treatment of women following gang rape and murder, Sundance welcomes more female directors while new study highlights gender gap, Obama appoints first woman to head SEC, Carlsbad legislator changes bill on rape and abortion.

Courtesy Warrior Woman

New Mexico filmmaker Julie Reichert talks about her film "Warrior Woman," which will screen January 19, 20 and 21 at the Guild Cinema in Albuquerque. It  tells a story of healing beyond physical recovery. Alice (played by Karen Young) has survived breast cancer, but her marriage and finances are falling apart and she is tormented by vivid, disturbing dreams. Emotionally raw, she feels compelled to protect her student, Thuy, from an abusive husband.

Suspects in India rape case to plead not guilty, Saudi Arabia grants women seats on top advisory council, Indonesian province seeks to ban female passengers straddling motorbikes, Facebook backs down over controversy on violence against women, Obama's cabinet becoming more male, New Mexico women push Rep. Steve Pearce on Violence Against Women Act

Jill Hodges and her husband adopted their son from Guatemala when he was six months old. At the time, they had very little information about his birth family in Guatemala. But whe stories began surfacing from that country about corruption in the adoption process and possible coercion, they wanted to find his birth mother to make sure she gave him up willingly, and to create a pathway for their son to connect with his birth family. Hodges chronicles that journey in "Extended Family," which is screening this weekend at the Santa Fe Film Festival.

In 1986, Sister Peggy O’Neill left behind her life in the U.S. to work in El Salvador. The Central American country was in the grip of a brutal civil war. Even nuns and priests had been murdered by government death squads.  But she stayed, working with the poor in the town of Suchitoto. O’Neill, a nun with the Sisters of Charity, will be in Albuquerque this evening to talk about the center she created for young people. Centro Arte Para la Paz promotes peace through the arts, creativity, imagination and cultural exchange.