Jenny Brundin

Like a lot of students, 17-year-old Nick Bain says he really likes his school, but sometimes it can feel like a chore.

"It just feels a little bit like you just have to keep doing one thing after another, but without a whole lot of thinking about an education in general," says Nick.

So one day he decided to write down what he was doing every 15 minutes at the Colorado Academy in Denver.

Building a giant steel bale feeder is hard. Try it.

Problem No. 1: Unless you live in ranch country, you probably don't even know what it's supposed to look like — regardless of whether you can build one.

Problem No. 2: Arc welding is involved.

Problem No. 3: Getting it right requires some serious math.

Hundreds of Colorado high school students have walked out of class in the past two weeks to protest proposed changes to the Advanced Placement history curriculum.

The firestorm of protest was sparked by a resolution in August from Jefferson County school board member Julie Williams. When she heard that conservatives across the country were upset about the new AP history curriculum, she proposed a committee to review the district's courses.

School lunch is often synonymous with loud noise. Studies have shown the decibel level in some cafeterias is as high as a lawn mower.

Every so often, though, students at Alice Terry Elementary School, southwest of Denver, are asked not to make any noise.

When the music teacher told students here they'd occasionally have a "silent" lunch break, this was kindergartner Alyssa Norquette's reaction: "Why do we need a silent lunch? Is it because we're too loud or something?"

Phoenix, AZ – The operator of the country's largest nuclear plant gave assurances Tuesday that problems facing a plant in Japan would not be problems in Arizona. Meanwhile, state utility regulators differ on the role of nuclear power in Arizona's future.

From the Fronteras Changing America Desk, Mark Brodie reports from Phoenix.


Salt Lake City, Utah – Faced with still growing populations of illegal immigrants, and an absence of federal action on immigration, many states are trying to adopt Arizona-style enforcement laws. But one conservative Western state right next to Arizona is taking a different approach.

For the Fronteras Changing America Desk, Jenny Brundin reports from KUER in Salt Lake City.