KUNM

Gwyneth Doland

Reporter/Call In Show Host

Gwyneth Doland is a correspondent for “New Mexico in Focus” on New Mexico PBS and an adjunct lecturer in the Communication and Journalism Department at UNM.

As the executive director for the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government she ran a hotline helping journalists and others get access to public records and open meetings. As the editor of The New Mexico Independent, a startup online-only news site, she and her team were honored with the 2010 First Amendment Award from ACLU of New Mexico. Her work for two alternative weekly papers, the Santa Fe Reporter and Weekly Alibi also won several awards.

Gwyneth is a former director of the Journalism and Women Symposium and New Mexico in Depth, and serves as the Freedom of Information Committee Chair for the Society of Professional Journalists Rio Grande Chapter. She was named the 2013 Communicator of the Year by the New Mexico Association of Women in Communications.

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KUNM Call In Show 5/25 8a: Call toll-free 877-899-5866. Lawmakers return to Santa Fe Wednesday for a special legislative session devoted to resolving an impasse on the state budget. The Roundhouse is controlled by Democrats and Governor Susana Martinez rejected the budget they sent to her in January—vetoing virtually all money for the legislative branch and for state colleges and universities. 

ccPixs.com

KUNM Call In Show 5/4 8a. President Trump has announced the outline of a tax plan that would lower taxes on businesses owners and the wealthy. He says it will help working families too, by giving breaks for things like child care. Critics on the left say the plan mostly helps the rich, while some on the right worry such big cuts would balloon the federal deficit. We'll look at some of the details we know and explore how they might affect New Mexicans. We'd like to hear from you! Would these tax changes help you or your business? Are you worried they might hurt people in the state? 

geralt via Pixabay / public domain

KUNM Call In Show 4/13 8a: Governor Susana Martinez vetoed a record 51 percent of the bills state lawmakers sent to her desk this year. She vetoed the entire budget for the state Legislature, every dollar for state colleges and universities, a total of $800 million in vetoes. The governor says she plans to call lawmakers back to Santa Fe for a special session. But what will be different? Will any of the bills she vetoed be back on the table? 

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KUNM Call In Show 3/9 8a: Violent crimes have stolen headlines over the last year, while property crimes remain a persistently unpleasant part of life all over New Mexico. Lawmakers in Santa Fe are debating how to reduce crime—but with little money available to do it. Which ideas could reduce crime and save money? Which sound good but cost a lot and have no guarantee? And which proposals have more to do with politics than anything else? 

Arianna Sena/KUNM

KUNM Call In Show 2/9 8a: With fresh leadership in the state Legislature has come new enthusiasm for reforms aimed at cracking down on potential corruption and bringing more transparency to government. Lawmakers have already voted to advance some of these proposals. Will they pass? Would a statewide ethics commission make you more confident in the integrity of our political system? 

Tax Credits via Flickr / Creative Commons

State lawmakers in Santa Fe are wrestling with a fiscal crisis. And the debate is familiar: cut spending or raise taxes in order to balance the budget. How would voters solve this problem?

Illustration by ccPixs.com

 

KUNM Call In Show 1/26 8a: Lawmakers have converged on Santa Fe for a two-month session during which their most pressing problem will be fixing a big hole in the state’s budget. This week we’ll talk about the governor’s proposal to cut already trimmed state funding and ask state employees to pay more into their retirement funds. We'll hear from Democratic lawmakers who say it’s not fair to make workers pay more before eliminating tax breaks for the wealthy and big business. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

KUNM Call in Show 1/12 8a: State lawmakers return to Santa Fe next week for a 60-day session during which they'll have to make some tough decisions about the budget, education, criminal justice, government accountability and more. 

KUNM Call In Show 11/17 8a: New Mexicans have been growing grapes for more than 400 years. Wine is a part of our religious and cultural history--but what part will it play in our future? 

rpclod via Wikimedia / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 11/10 8a: Call toll-free 1-877-899-5866. What happens now that the 2016 election is over? We'll talk to political observers all over New Mexico. Did money spent by candidates translate into votes? Will local power structures shift and how? What local ballot questions passed or failed? We want to hear from you, too. How was your experience voting? How will the outcome of the election impact you and your community? Email callinshow@kunm.org or call in live during the show!

New Mexico in Focus

Bernalillo County Clerk Democrat Maggie Toulouse Oliver is running become New Mexico’s next Secretary of State.

Oliver sat down for a conversation with Gwyneth Doland, as part of KUNM’s special election overage with New Mexico PBS.  Her Republican opponent, state lawmaker Nora Espinoza declined multiple interview requests.

New Mexico in Focus

U.S. Representative Democrat Michelle Lujan Grisham is running for re-election this year in New Mexico’s first district. She sat down with Gwyneth Doland to discuss critical issues for voters as part of KUNM’s special election coverage with New Mexico PBS.

Her Republican challenger Richard Priem did not respond to multiple interview requests from New Mexico PBS. 

Quitlawbiz.com, CC

The 2016 election is just around the corner, less than four weeks away. Republican Supreme Court Justice Judith Nakamura is running to keep her seat on the bench. Democrat Chief New Mexico Appeals Court Judge Michael Vigil is challenging her. The candidates sat down for a conversation as part of KUNM’s special election coverage with New Mexico PBS.

stock.tookapic.com via Pexels.com / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 10/6 8a: New Mexico is having a love affair with local breweries and distilleries. This week we’ll talk about the economic impact that breweries and distilleries are having on the state. What do you think? How can we help grow and support the industry? How can we make sure it contributes fairly to the economy? 

Flickr photo by VoxFX

KUNM Call In Show 9/15 8a: A lot of New Mexicans don't vote in general elections - often nearly half the people who can legally vote here don't. And the stakes are high this November with a hotly contested presidential election at the top of the ticket. We’ll talk about why so many New Mexicans don't vote. Is it hard for you to make it to the polls? Are you turned off by the candidates that you have to choose from? Or are you ineligible to vote?

Sally King, National Park Service

KUNM Call In Show 8/18 8a: 

  

In New Mexico there has always been tension between humans and the wild animals who share our state, so how should we manage that tension? If a bear mauls a marathon runner, should it be shot? How should we deal with coyotes who prey on our pets, wolves that snatch calves or cougars that come just a little too close to the kids? 

New Mexico’s unique way of paying for public infrastructure projects has been under fire lately. Critics say lawmakers often divert money as political pork, at the expense of statewide construction projects. 

Now some  government officials are taking steps to address the problem at the local level. 

Kari Greer / US Forest Service Gila National Forest

KUNM Call In Show 4/21 8a: 

You probably noticed that this February and March were much warmer and drier than normal. In fact, this year New Mexico got only 12 percent of the rainfall it usually gets in March. The unusually warm weather prompted mountain snow to melt faster and earlier than usual, while winds whipped up wild fires, stripping land that then becomes vulnerable to flooding.

Victor via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 4/7 8a: The level of crime in our cities makes many New Mexicans feel unsafe. And disturbing violent crimes have dominated our attention recently. Is our system working to make New Mexico safer?

Arianna Sena/KUNM

Polls show New Mexicans believe their government is corrupt. State lawmakers say that while there may be a few bad apples, the system we have is working.

But the facts show just the opposite: New Mexico has the widest gap in the country between the laws on the books and the way those laws are actually enforced, according to a 2015 report from the Center for Public Integrity.

Arianna Sena/KUNM

During the 2016 legislative session, the People, Power and Democracy project tracked efforts to address ethics, accountability and money in politics. This year lawmakers met for only 30 days and were charged first and foremost with preparing a state budget. Most of the bills we followed failed, but many sponsors and advocacy groups pledged to return again in the longer 2017 session and try a gain. Here’s a summary of the proposals we watched most closely.

What Passed

House webcasts to be archived

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Over the past few years New Mexico has used short-term solutions to balance the budget without raising taxes. But if oil and gas prices stay low, it will become more and more of a challenge to find the money the state needs to pay the bills.

Raising at least some taxes might not be politically popular, but Sen. John Arthur Smith, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, argues it’s the fiscally conservative thing to do. And he wants to start with the gas tax.

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New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas on Monday brought felony charges against a former state senator accused of using his office to make money on a land deal.

Zack McCarthy via CC

In front of a group of commercial real estate developers, Gov. Susana Martinez signed a bill she said will make the campaign finance system more accurate and transparent, and make it easier for the public to access the information.

Gwyneth Doland

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 2/25 8a:  

State legislators passed a budget, created a REAL-ID driver's license fix, cracked down on DWI and child porn and advanced bail reform. But did they do anything to reverse the tide of indicators that New Mexicans have lost faith in state government? We look at what lawmakers did, or didn't do, to restore the public trust. 

Chris Goldberg via Flickr, Creative Commons

The NM Legislature wrapped up another session. KUNM's Chris Boros speaks with Gwyneth Doland about what happened and what didn’t happen.

Arianna Sena

Lawmakers are wrapping up a 30-day session in Santa Fe Thursday. They’ve hammered out a budget, moved forward on some crime-fighting bills and spent time debating anti-corruption proposals. 

tomwsulcer / Creative Commons License

A state House panel on Tuesday approved a bill that would give political candidates and elected officials clearer guidelines on how they can spend money from their campaign accounts. It's been an embarrassing problem for the state.

Arianna Sena/KUNM

The state Senate halted an attempt to create an ethics commission on Tuesday that would have overseen the legislative and executive branches.

revisorweb via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons License

The People, Power and Democracy project is focusing on state government ethics and transparency in the 2016 legislative session. Correspondent Gwyneth Doland spoke with KUNM's Chris Boros.

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