Gwyneth Doland

Reporter/Call In Show Host

Gwyneth Doland is a correspondent for “New Mexico in Focus” on New Mexico PBS and an adjunct lecturer in the Communication and Journalism Department at UNM.

As the executive director for the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government she ran a hotline helping journalists and others get access to public records and open meetings. As the editor of The New Mexico Independent, a startup online-only news site, she and her team were honored with the 2010 First Amendment Award from ACLU of New Mexico. Her work for two alternative weekly papers, the Santa Fe Reporter and Weekly Alibi also won several awards.

Gwyneth is a former director of the Journalism and Women Symposium and New Mexico in Depth, and serves as the Freedom of Information Committee Chair for the Society of Professional Journalists Rio Grande Chapter. She was named the 2013 Communicator of the Year by the New Mexico Association of Women in Communications.

Mike Tungate via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 11/19 8a:


In the past few months there's been an exodus of high-profile companies leaving Albuquerque's downtown area, including nearly half of the big banks, a pioneering restaurant and the city's business newspaper. 

That's left people who work and live downtown worried that the decade-old revitalization effort is failing as economic drivers are attracted to other parts of the city. 

Emilie Udell for the Center For Public Integrity

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 11/12 8a: 

It’s become habit in New Mexico to groan about incompetence and corruption in state government as though it’s something terrible—but out of our control. Ugh, these politicians. What can you do? 

Nicolas Raymond via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 11/5 8a:


The federal government says New Mexico driver’s licenses don't meet the standards of the REAL ID Act and that we don't get another extension to fix them. 

Are people going to be prevented from using state ID's to get on airplanes? 

John Wardell (Netinho) via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 10/29, 8a: Secretary of State Dianna Duran resigned last week and pleaded guilty to charges including felony embezzlement for taking campaign donations and using them to gamble at local casinos. The deputy secretary of state is filling in, but what happens next?

401(K) 2012 via Flickr

KUNM Call In Show 10/16 8a: 


A new water system for the Cebolleta Land Grant down South. A dam in Cabresto, near Taos. The new interchange at Paseo del Norte and I-25 in Albuquerque. The Spaceport. These are the kind of infrastructure projects that move water and people around the state—and maybe someday, outer space. They cost a lot of money, and some or most of that money comes from the state.

Dave Lea via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 9/17 8a:  

What will the New Mexico of the future look like? How will we address the issues facing our state –  poverty, water, jobs and transportation? This week on the KUNM show we'll talk to former U.S. Senator Fred Harris about his new book, New Mexico 2050.

Nicole Macdonald via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 9/10 8a:

New Mexico is once again grappling with accusations of corruption in state government. Secretary of State Dianna Duran was elected in 2010 as a reform candidate who would straighten things up after scandal had plagued the office. But now she, too, is tarnished by charges she took money from her campaign coffers and spent it at casinos.

Johnathan Thompson / High Country News

KUNM Call In Show 8/20 8a: The mustard-yellow plume has passed and the Animas and San Juan rivers are now open again. But how long will the toxic chemicals from the Gold King Mine spill linger? We'll find out what's being done to clean up the rivers - and ask, who should pay for it? Can mining companies be held accountable? Should the EPA pay because they triggered the spill?

We'd like to hear from you! Comment on Facebook or Twitter. 


New Mexico State University

KUNM Call In Show 8/6 8a:

*Editor's note: We regret that because of technical difficulties there is no audio archived for this show.


Weeds: Not the kind that you smoke, the kind that are sprouting up in every corner of your yard right now. Goat heads, yellow mustardy things, purslane, lambs' quarters. How can you tell the difference between a plant that will drop spiky demon seeds and a weedy-looking thing that makes pretty flowers? Or tastes good? And once you've identified the ones you want to get rid of, can you do you do it safely and permanently? via CC


The nation’s prison system is in crisis. Prison and jail populations ballooned to an all-time high, and the number of people on probation and parole has doubled.

Meanwhile, we're spending more on incarceration than we ever have—and most of that money comes out of the states’ pockets.

ABQ Biopark

KUNM Call In Show 7/23 8a:

Albuquerque has been home to the Rio Grande Zoo since 1927 and its 64 acres of exhibits delight and teach children of all ages. Now the city is considering a master plan for the zoo’s next 20 years. 

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol via flickr

In March the New Mexico state Legislature unanimously passed a bill that would basically eliminate what critics call “policing for profit,” the ability of law enforcement agencies to seize cars, cash and other property police say were used in committing a crime. The practice originated in the 1980s as a tool to fight back against big drug dealers, but civil liberties groups on the right and left of the political spectrum say the lure of big money has now corrupted government agencies, who use the law to pad their coffers.


Arianna Sena

KUNM's Floyd Vasquez chatted with Gwyneth Doland about bills from the state legislature that passed this session as part of our People, Power and Democracy reporting project. Our partners are New Mexico In Depth, New Mexico PBS and the UNM Communication and Journalism Department. 

KUNM: The session ended at noon on Saturday. Now that it’s all over, tell us what happened?

Arianna Sena

KUNM's Chris Boros chatted with Gwyneth Doland about bills that did not pass at the state legislature this session. It's part of our People, Power and Democracy reporting project. Our partners are New Mexico In Depth, New Mexico PBS and the UNM Communication and Journalism Department. 

KUNM: We heard from you this morning about some of the bills that passed and are awaiting the governor's signature. But that was only a couple hundred bills. And there are many, many more that did not make it.

starreyez024 via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The New Mexico state Legislature this week passed a $6.23 billion budget (HB 2) that increasing funding for education, job training and other programs. It also includes a tenfold increase in the Local Economic Development Act fund, one of the rare proposals this session that were supported by Democrats as well as Gov. Susana Martinez.

Legislature May Require Public Comment

Mar 16, 2015
opensourceway via Flickr / Creative Commons License

You may not want to listen to your nutty neighbor badger the city council about chemtrails or aliens, First Amendment advocates say allowing public comments—even wacky comments—is essential. A bill moving through the state Legislature would make it the law.

Brak Perkins via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The cost of tuition at New Mexico public universities is rising and more students are taking advantage of the lottery scholarship, which pays almost full tuition for qualifying students—but fewer people are buying the scratch-off tickets that fuel the scholarship fund.

That’s one of the factors contributing to a slow-building crisis in scholarship funding.

J.N. Stuart via Flickr



Many counties and municipalities in New Mexico have passed restrictions on mining, oil and gas that go beyond state laws. These are things like: dictating how close wells can be to homes or imposing weight limits on trucks.

A controversial bill (HB 366) that would limit that local control, and give the state exclusive power over all matters relating to oil and gas, passed the House Tuesday.

Wikimedia Commons

KUNM's Chris Boros chatted with Gwyneth Doland on recent news from the state legislature as part of our People, Power and Democrayc reporting project. Our partners are New Mexico In Depth and New Mexico PBS. 

KUNM:  Let’s start with the two bills that would restrict abortions. One would ban abortions later in pregnancy and another would require teens to notify their parents. The Catholic bishops are pushing this hard and so are groups that oppose abortions who tried for the ban in Albuquerque last year.



After stalling in committee last month, a bill requiring more transparency from lobbyists cruised through the state House Saturday after hitting only one last speed bump.

On Saturday, state Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard, D-Los Alamos, unsuccessfully tried to amend the bill on the floor and put some of those requirements back in.

But with just two weeks left in the session, supporters of more transparency for lobbyists say even a stripped-down bill is an important first step.

Arianna Sena

The state’s Whistleblower Protection Act went into effect in 2010 and since then the state has had to spend a lot more money dealing with lawsuits. A bill in the state legislature would address that by making it harder to make a whistleblower claim.

Under current law, public employees who face retaliation for exposing corruption can sue the state for double back pay. State Senator Joseph Cervantes sponsored the original measure.

ChrisGoldNY via Flickr

KUNM Call In Show 3/5 8a: 

Critics say short term loans trap New Mexicans in a cycle of poverty. Often borrowers end up paying more than the amount of the loan in interest. But lending industry supporters say people who take out storefront loans know exactly what they are getting into and that there aren't other easy ways to get small loans quickly.

State lawmakers in Santa Fe are considering changes to how the storefront loan industry is regulated. Should we let the free market work it out or do New Mexicans need protection from what some call predatory lending? 

kmillard92 via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Most New Mexicans think their state government is full of bad apples. The problem is, it’s really hard to tell which ones are good for us—and which ones are rotten.

According to a poll released Monday, three-quarters of New Mexico business leaders say they want the state to have an independent ethics commission. Two proposals moving through the state legislature would do just that.

Democratic Representative Brian Egolf says unlike many of our neighbors, we don’t have an organized way of investigating officials accused of corruption.

Arianna Sena

Scanned copies of all state contracts should be available on the Sunshine Portal, say two lawmakers who are proposing an update to the state transparency website.

Posting original documents would give New Mexicans a bigger window into state contracts, something that’s important to business owners, says one of the bill’s sponsors, Sen. Sander Rue, R-Albuquerque.

593D ESC via Flickr / Creative Commons License


Whether they’re shopping for a refrigerator, a laptop or a used car, most people do some comparison shopping before making a big purchase.

But that’s not the way healthcare works in New Mexico, where comparing prices for a hip replacement or asthma treatment is practically impossible. 

Gwyneth Doland

New Mexico is one of only a handful of states that don’t restrict late-term abortions. But that could change if a bill moving through the state Legislature is successful.

MyTudut via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 2/19 8a: 

When the New Mexico legislature convenes in Santa Fe, lobbyists flock to the Roundhouse to pitch their clients' issues and legislation. Often those pitches involve free food, drinks and other gifts.

We'll look at the industries that spend the most money to convince lawmakers to support their ideas. We'll also ask how lobbyists affect which bills are passed and which measures stall.

We'd like to hear from you! Email, post your comments online or call in live during the show. 


John Hartman via Flickr

New Mexico state representatives voted Thursday to repeal a state law that allows people to get New Mexico driver’s licenses even if they’re in the country illegally.  Some observers see this as a political battle in which winning the war isn’t as important as fighting the battle.

Pointing to several examples of fraud, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez asked state lawmakers again this year to stop allowing immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally to get driver’s licenses here.

Gwyneth Doland

They don’t have big expense accounts or cozy relationships with powerful lawmakers. They don’t even know where the bathroom is. They’re citizen lobbyists, and they got some training at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe Wednesday.

Members of 20 conservation groups converged on the state capitol and a few dozen of them attended a training session held by the Sierra Club.

They were teachers, writers and retired engineers, passionate about ending coyote-killing contests, cleaning up uranium mines and preventing the diversion of the Gila River.

Thomas Hawk via Flickr

Skeptical lawmakers rejected a proposal Monday that would have given the public more information about lobbying at the state Legislature.

The bill (HB 155) would have required lobbyists to divulge their salaries, file reports of their estimated and actual lobbying expenses, and list the issues—but not the exact bills—they are working on.