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The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Auditor Finds 'Serious Issues' At Apple Supplier Foxconn

A Foxconn International Holdings Ltd, complex is pictured on November 2010 in Shenzhen, China.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

A review completed by the Fair Labor Association found "significant issues with working conditions at three factories in China operated by Apple's major supplier Foxconn."

Apple joined the Fair Labor Association after various reports detailed poor working conditions at the supplier factories. Those reports spawned protests against Apple and Apple responded by saying the FLA would audit the Chinese factories.

In its press release the FLA said the big issues revolved around overtime. The FLA reports:

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The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

House Passes 2013 Budget That Includes Private Option For Medicare

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) says his budget offers "real solutions."
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Voting along party lines, the House of Representatives passed a 2013 budget that was crafted by Rep. Paul Ryan, a Republican from Wisconsin.

Politico reports:

"The 228-191 vote gives the embattled GOP leadership what it most wanted: a show of party unity behind a bold election-year vision that includes new private options for Medicare and a simplified tax code.

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Amid National Strike, Hundreds Of Thousands Protest In Spain

People attend a demonstration in Madrid on Thursday during a national strike.
Dani Pozo AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of thousands across Spain took to the streets to protest the latest austerity measures proposed by Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy.

The protests were the culmination of a 24-hour general strike that affected air travel and public transportation.

The AP reports:

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Shots - Health Blog
1:19 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

How Your Brain Is Like Manhattan

This image shows the grid structure of the major pathways of the brain. It was created using a scanner that's part of the Human Connectome Project, a five-year effort which is studying and mapping the human brain.
MGH-UCLA Human Connectome Project

It turns out your brain is organized even if you're not.

At least that's the conclusion of a study in Science that looked at the network of fibers that carry signals from one part of the brain to another.

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It's All Politics
1:12 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

For Romney, Rationale Behind Rubio Endorsement May Be Bigger Prize

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., talks at the Hispanic Leadership Network in Miami on Jan. 27.
Alan Diaz AP

Mitt Romney's endorsements this week by two important Republicans — a former president and perhaps a not-too-distant-future presidential running mate — are not unexpected.

But the reasons former President George H.W. Bush and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio give for backing the front-runner are a little less standard political fare.

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The Picture Show
1:11 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Found In A Closet: A Photo Trove Of '60s Icons

The found photographs of Jack Robinson include Warren Beatty, Tina Turner and Jack Nicholson
Jack Robinson Vogue/Conde Nast Archive

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:55 am

You never know what people are hiding. When Dan Oppenheimer opened the door to Jack Robinson's apartment, for example, he had no idea what he'd discover. He knew that Robinson had been a photographer in an earlier chapter of his life that he rarely spoke of.

Oppenheimer, who had been Robinson's boss at a stained-glass studio in Memphis, recalls that Robinson kept mostly to himself and had very few friends. Few people even knew he had died, which might explain why Oppenheimer found himself in this position to begin with: There was no one else to take care of the effects.

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Author Interviews
1:08 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

'Escape From Camp 14': Inside North Korea's Gulag

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 6:09 pm

Until his early 20s, the only life Shin Dong-hyuk had ever known was one of constant beatings, near starvation and snitching on others to survive. Born into one of the worst of North Korea's system of prison camps, Shin was doomed to a life of hard labor and an early death. Notions of love and family were meaningless: He saw his mother as a competitor for food.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Review: 'Running The Rift'

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Athletes all over the world are training for the summer Olympics in London. We'll hear some of their personal stories as the games get closer. But now, a fictional story about a man who wants to reach the Olympics. "Running the Rift" is about an African athlete's struggles with his country's ethnic divisions.

Here's our reviewer, Alan Cheuse.

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Politics
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Congress Passes Highway Bill To Avoid Shutdown

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It wasn't just the budget that lawmakers clashed over today. The House and Senate each passed short-term transportation bills. And that sets up yet another showdown over spending, as NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: If Congress hadn't passed the short-term transportation bills, beginning this weekend, the government wouldn't have been able to spend money on transportation programs or collect fuel taxes. Disaster averted, right?

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Parents Make Child's Death Their Cause

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

These days, the parents of Treyvon Martin are in the news every day. In the months since their son was shot to death in Sanford, Florida, they've spoken at press conferences and rallies, addressed newspaper editorial boards and even Congress.

Treyvon's father, Tracy Martin, came here to NPR this week. On the program TELL ME MORE, he spoke about the process of dealing with his son's death, saying, it will be a long time before the healing even starts.

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Health Care
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

What Happens If Affordable Care Act Is Cut By Court?

What happens to the provisions of the federal health care law if the Supreme Court throws it out entirely? Melissa Block discusses that with NPR health policy correspondent Julie Rovner.

Asia
12:51 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Headed For The Butcher, Chinese Dogs Are Rescued

A volunteer feeds one of the dogs rescued from slaughter last December in a stand-off between animal rights activists and dog-meat sellers in central China. Such rescues have been taking place with some regularity in China.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 6:06 pm

To say that people in China eat dogs is something of a stereotype.

Sure, some still do, but these days, more and more Chinese are buying dogs as pets and treating them like beloved family members.

In the last year, that growing affection has taken a radical turn. Activists have begun stopping trucks along the highway carrying dogs to slaughter and then negotiating their release.

A Last-Minute Rescue

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It's All Politics
12:38 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Democrats Embrace 'ObamaCare' To Defang It

Supporters of the health care law have recently embraced the term "Obamacare," a word they once recoiled from.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 4:50 pm

A funny thing happened on the way to the Supreme Court and during the three days the court heard oral arguments on the Affordable Care Act. Democrats embraced the "Obamacare" name the law's foes had used as an epithet for two years to deride the law.

In the political equivalent of what happens in battle when the enemy's captured artillery piece is turned around and the opponent's own shells are fired back at them, Democrats decided to take ownership of a word they once seemed to avoid at all costs.

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The Salt
12:10 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

What Is Community Supported Agriculture? The Answer Keeps Changing

A member of the community supported agriculture program at Congregation Shearith Israel picks from boxes of squash and cucumbers in Atlanta. Some purists say CSAs are drifting away from their roots.
John Amis AP

Community supported agriculture sounds so simple. Support a local farm, get to know your farmer, enjoy weekly deliveries of fresh produce, and rest easy knowing that you've voted for the local economy with your food dollars.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:04 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Autism Rates Jump Again, As Diagnosis Improves

Some children with autism have trouble speaking, and use images to help communicate.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 7:28 pm

The number of children diagnosed with autism jumped 23 percent between 2006 and 2008, according to the latest federal estimate.

Now, 1 in 88 children has been diagnosed with autism, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The rapid rise prompted calls to declare the developmental disorder an epidemic. "This is a national emergency in need of a national plan," Mark Roithmayr, president of the advocacy group Autism Speaks, said at a CDC media briefing Thursday.

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

After Controversy, Toulouse Gunman Buried In France

A sign on the ground marks the place for municipal workers to dig in Cornebarrieu cemetery, a Toulouse suburb in southwestern France.
Eric Cabanis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 1, 2012 7:33 am

At first, his family wanted the body of Mohamed Merah sent back to Algeria. Then after the country refused Merah's body, French authorities settled on burying him in Toulouse, where he was suspected of killing seven before he was shot and killed after a two-day siege of his apartment.

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The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Three Key Moments As Trayvon Martin's Story Went Viral

Part of the awareness raising effort: the Justice for Trayvon Martin page on Facebook.
Facebook.com

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 12:10 pm

What moved Trayvon Martin's Feb. 26 death from a local story to a national tale that has sparked a discussion about racial profiling and race relations?

Social media played a critical role. And there were key moments along the way.

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All Tech Considered
11:02 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Using An App To Report Injured Wildlife

A rescued bobcat waits to be fed at a wild animal sanctuary in Keenesburg, Colo.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 11:04 am

If you find an injured bird in your back yard, do you know who to call? The Boulder, Colo., group Animal Watch has developed a free iPhone and iPad application and a website called AnimalHelpNow designed to assist with such an emergency. The app and site only work for locations in Colorado, but its developers hope to expand the program nationally.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:55 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Like The U.S., Europe Wrestles With Health Care

A patient is treated at the Nord Hospital in Marseille, France, in February. European countries have also been engaged in intense debates on the future of their health care systems, where universal coverage is the norm.
Anne-Chrisine Poujoulat AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 1:57 pm

The U.S. has been absorbed by the Supreme Court case this week on the future of health care. But Americans are not alone.

Several European nations, where universal health care has been the norm for decades, have been waging their own intense debates as they also deal with aging populations and rising costs.

Britain passed a new health care measure earlier this month, after more than a year of rancorous debate. Can the European experience cast some light on the American debate over health care?

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Gingrich Is 'At The End Of His Line' Says His Biggest Financial Supporter

Sheldon Adelson.
Mike Clarke AFP/Getty Images
  • NPR's Peter Overby, during the noon ET Newscast

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Study: Conservatives' Trust In Science At Record Low

Elizabeth Burrows of LaGrange, Kentucky, walks with her children, as they tour the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky. The privately funded museum exhibits the Earth's history according to the Bible.
Mark Lyons Getty Images

While trust in science has remained flat for most Americans, a new study finds that for those who identify as conservatives trust in science has plummeted to its lowest level since 1974.

Gordon Gauchat, a sociology professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, studied data from the General Social Survey and found that changes in confidence in science are not uniform across all groups.

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It's All Politics
10:07 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Santorum Seeks Some Reagan Jelly Belly Magic

A portrait of President Ronald Reagan made from jelly beans at the Jelly Belly Co. visitor center, in Fairfield, Calif., in June 2004. The photo was taken shortly after his death.
STEVE YEATER AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 9:32 am

For some people, few things say "Ronald Reagan" like Jelly Belly candy, apparently. Which explains why Rick Santorum will be holding a rally at the California headquarters of the candy maker Thursday.

Santorum is scheduled to attend a "Rally for Rick" event at the Jelly Belly Candy Co. facility in Fairfield, Calif.

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Law
10:00 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Who Writes Our Laws?

Trayvon Martin's death has put a spotlight on Florida's "stand your ground" law. The American Legislative Exchange Council uses that law as a model and encourages other states to adopt it. Host Michel Martin speaks with Lisa Graves of the progressive watchdog Center for Media and Democracy. She says ALEC is fueled by corporate interests.

Law
10:00 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Trayvon Martin's Family Boosts Public Profile

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 10:35 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We are continuing our conversation about this very emotional case that has sparked so much discussion around the country. We're talking about the killing of 17 year old Trayvon Martin.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:52 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Just Say No To The 'Cinnamon Challenge'

A spoonful of cinnamon is a great idea for apple pie. Eaten straight? Not so much.
Maxim Khytra iStockphoto.com

Do not take the "cinnamon challenge." Don't let anyone you know take it, either.

And don't take our word for it. Instead, heed the warning from the folks who run the country's poison control centers.

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Europe
9:41 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Vatican Leaks Raise Questions Over Finances

Italian financial police officers talk in front of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Recently leaked Vatican documents have raised questions about the Vatican's financial transactions.
Angelo Carconi AP

The Vatican has launched a rare criminal investigation to uncover who is behind leaks of highly sensitive documents that allege corruption and financial mismanagement in Vatican City.

The documents also shed light on purported infighting over the Vatican Bank's compliance with international money-laundering regulations.

A television show in late January on an independent network first revealed letters addressed last year to Pope Benedict XVI from the then-deputy governor of Vatican City, Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano.

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The Salt
9:32 am
Thu March 29, 2012

What Foodies Heard During This Week's Supreme Court Arguments

The broccoli was flying this week in the Supreme Court.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 9:57 am

There were plenty of weighty questions bandied about during this week's historic oral arguments on the future of the health care law — which our colleagues over at Shots did an excellent job covering. But we here at The Salt couldn't help noticing that when the Supreme Court justices talk, they let the food metaphors fly.

By now, you've probably heard the most famous of these: the broccoli question. If the government can mandate you to have health insurance, can it also force you to buy broccoli?

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Afghanistan
9:13 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Dreams Of A Mining Future On Hold In Afghanistan

Afghan miners in a makeshift emerald mine in the Panjshir Valley in 2010. Reports suggest that Afghanistan is sitting on significant deposits of oil, gas, copper, iron, gold and coal, as well as a range of precious gems like emeralds and rubies. Currently these minerals are largely untapped and are still being mapped.
Majid Saeedi Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 3:27 pm

Afghanistan faces the daunting prospect of a drastic reduction in foreign aid, which currently makes up about 90 percent of the country's revenue. Some have seen an economic life raft in geological surveys that indicate huge deposits of copper, iron, uranium and lithium in various parts of the country. But multinational mining firms have been slow to invest in Afghanistan — not least because of questions about stability after American troops draw down.

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The Two-Way
8:54 am
Thu March 29, 2012

West Virginia Mine Superintendent Pleads Guilty To Fraud

"The former superintendent of a southern West Virginia mine where an explosion killed 29 workers in April 2010 pleaded guilty Thursday to a federal fraud charge," The Associated Press reports. "Gary May of Bloomingrose, the highest-ranking Massey Energy official charged in connection with the blast, faces up to five years in prison when sentenced Aug. 9."

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The Two-Way
6:55 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Today On The Campaign Trail: George H.W. Bush To Endorse Romney

Mitt Romney (left) and former President George H.W. Bush in 2007.
Ben Sklar Getty Images
  • Wade Goodwyn reporting

In case you're keeping track of high-profile endorsements in the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination:

Wednesday, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney picked up the support of Florida Sen. Mark Rubio. This afternoon in Houston, as NPR's Wade Goodwyn tells our Newscast Desk, former President George H.W. Bush will endorse Romney. Bush's wife Barbara and son Jeb (a former Florida governor) have already said Romney's their candidate.

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